My Quest To Teach

March 24, 2018

Building Your HBCU Brand That Builds Your Worth

William Jackson My Quest To Teach

Building Your HBCU Brand That Builds Your Worth
by William Jackson, M.Edu.
@wmjackson – #MyQuestToTeach
Wm Jackson is a graduate of South Carolina
State University and past instructor at the
oldest HBCU in Florida – Edward Waters College

In todays society HBCU students cannot allow
others to Brand them or label them.
There are billions of people on the planet, each
person from conception to death has a story and
a personal Brand. Students cannot allow others to
tell their story, to Brand with error about
who they are, and what they are about.

HBCUs have a rich history of culture, creativity,
innovation and invention. They must tell their
own stories to collectively expand the potential
of graduates and influence the world.
How others see you is important, society should
see you beyond skin tones, hair styles, and accept
the beautiful imperfections that we each have and
should embrace in ourselves.

This is why an HBCUs Brand is important to help
define outside of visual and cultural perceptions.
Why would anyone allow mass media to define them,
to tell an incomplete and inaccurate story that
only sees or tells false/half truths. HBCUs even
today are fighting for not just financial support,
they are striving for respect and recognition too
show their continued and transformative contributions
in this nation.

In 2013, St. Paul College closed after 125 years,
a rich history of building men and women, their
stories continue in history.
There are many other HBCUs that have not survived
history, they live on in their students and the
accomplishments still being achieved.
Science Technology Engineering Arts Mathematics/
Medicine are the legacy in the 20th and 21st century.
The Brand of HBCUs should continuously be modified
and adapted for telling a story of growth, hope
and preparing for the future. HBCU students
personal Brands should be self reflective,
what do students want society to see, that do
HBCU students want societies perceptions to be?

The work that goes into building a Brand is not an exact
science, it allows that person to be reflective.
HBCU studens must find out what their Brand is personally,
asking themselves where they are heading:
What do they want to do with their life? How can they
match their career aspirations with their personal Brand?
How do they want society to see them? What makes them unique?
What are their strengths? What are their weaknesses?
HBCU students must identity why their Brand is important?
Understanding your “Personal Brand” how you present yourself
to others understanding your “Brand Identity” the qualities
that make you unique and different from others. HBCU
students need to understand the importance of their
Personal Brand in starting a career, standing out from
others, personal self confidence.

Celebrities are not the only ones that benefit from Personal
Branding. There is competition for employment and career
stability is fierce. Having a Personal Brand workig can
be the difference between an entry level position
or executive positions.

Controlling your Brand helps you control how you are
perceived, when you see Brands like Nike, Adidas, Reebok,
Coke, Pepsi, Empire, Scandal, The View and other products.
Each one you expect a certain thing from them. The same
should be held for HBCU’s as well, what do you as the
student expect people to expect. Your Brand can make you
memorable or nefarious, notorious or noticeable, you decide.

Ever Rising

Background information:
William Jackson is a past Professor at Edward Waters College,
where he designed a curriculum that embraced Educational
Technology, Social Media and STEAM from 2004 to 2017.
He is a WordCamp organizer, blogger, volunteer, speaker and
digital community activist for TEDxFSCJ and the Social Media
Manager for Jacksonville Sister Cities Association.
He blogs about his life experiences as he travels speaking
to youth, teens and young adults and is a member of the body
of Christ with Northside Church of Christ.
William has 28 years as a public school educator in
Physical Education and Technology Instruction and
is a community activist where he is actively engaged in
the Jacksonville, Florida community with Vision Keepers
and New Town Success Zone.
William is joined by Aida Correa who is an artist, blogger,
poet, actress and a proud Latina. Both are parents to adult
children. They can be found on Twither at:
@wmjackson and @latinapheonix and hashtags respectively
#MyQuestToTeach and #LoveBuiltLife #LoveBuiltStudio

20180106_143559

 

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October 2, 2017

George Maxey of New Town Success Zone Participates in TEDxFSCJ

George Maxey of New Town Success Zone Participates in TEDxFSCJ
by William Jackson, My Quest To Teach
#MyQuestToTeach

George Maxey, Executive Director of New Town Success
Zone,  Lashontah Holiday, Project Coordinator/Data
Analysis Manager and William Jackson, Educator,
Community Activist, Social Media Visionary with
My Quest To Teach attended the TEDxFSCJ with a
discussion focusing on the effects of violence and
incarceration, the lived realities of racism and
gender-based trauma, the economic roots of crime,
and policy innovations within the criminal justice
system.
The seriousness of the growth of youth crime and
violence was the central focus of this panel discussion
centered around the causes of youth, teens and young
adults that enter into the justice system because of
criminal involvement. Additional focus was on
prevention and understanding why this is happening
and the value of improving the educational system
to help youth and teens that have been in the justice
system. The importance of having youth,
teens and  young adults part of the discussion with
the State Attorney Office, law enforcement and even
collaboration with state, local and national governmental
agencies to prevent crime by youth, teens
and young adults.
Titled “Common Stories, Uncommon Futures”
George E. Maxey, the Executive director of the New Town
Success Zone participated in the TEDxFSCJ panel discussion,
also present and participating were:
Melissa W. Nelson, the State Attorney for Florida’s
Fourth Judicial Circuit.
Kimberly Hall, professor of criminal justice at Florida
State College at Jacksonville.
Christina Parrish Stone, Executive Director of the
Springfield Preservation and Revitalization Council, Inc.
Davin Brown, 17-year-old senior at Robert E. Lee High
School and a founding member of the EVAC Movement.
Alyssa Beck, advocacy specialist for the Delores
Barr Weaver Policy Center, with a passion for improving
the lives of young women. New Town Success Zone,
Vision Keepers and community volunteers are working
to bring about change in communities by providing
relevant resources and experts in diverse fields that
are teaching in fields such as medical information,
business ownership, entrepreneurial growth,
building self-confidence and community collaborations.
Workshops are being offered and monthly training
to engage community members and build self-esteem,
community pride and continued participation in
the education system to provide a motivating force
for children.
Communication is very important from using
Social Media platforms like Facebook to word of mouth,
workshops and even food giveaways. Multiple strategies
to feed the mind and body.
More information can be found at:
Vision Keepers
https://www.facebook.com/VisionKeepersofNewTown/
George Maxey
https://www.facebook.com/george.maxey.90
Additional Photos from event provided by 
Wm Jackson 
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/slideshow/TEDxFSCJ%20Youth%20Crime

 

May 22, 2017

EWC and HBCU Students Should Be Attending WordCamps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EWC and HBCU Students
Should Be Attending WordCamps

by William Jackson @wmjackson
Emma Kent @librarianewc

The WordCamp Jacksonville was a prime opportunity
for EWC and HBCU students to meet and interact with
industry professionals in the fields of web development,
graphic design, Java development, Cybersecurity and
other areas of Branding, Marketing, Advertising and
business ventures in the area of tech.
The opportunity to share their voices through tech
has never been available before in history for EWC and
HBCU students.

Emma Kent, MA, MLIS librarian of Edward Waters
College attending her first WordCamp shared the
historical importance of EWC and HBCU students to
continue to grow and be engaged is as many tech
conferences like WordCamp Jacksonville. Ms. Kent
talking to the industry leaders, developers, bloggers,
programmers, etc.

Social Media has moved beyond the traditional
blogging into a broader spectrum of interactive
engagement, connectivity, Branding, Marketing,
find a person’s Niche and even collaborations in business.
The levels of engagement, interactivity and networking
is valuable for EWC students that have dreams of
moving into new areas of careers in technology, but do
not know who to connect with.

This is a big challenge, HBCU students do not think
conferences, meetups, workshop and networking events
are important, but are dangerously wrong.
Meetups, conferences, summits, workshops and
other events are important to understand who to
connect with, where to go to connect and the
value of getting your name in the minds of
professionals that can offer Internships, scholarships,
jobs and open doors that were once closed.
Emma Kent and William Jackson, Presenters

 

 

 

The presentation
“How to be DOPE on Social Media and Relevant,”
was celebrated as bringing a diversity of
content and cultural connections. Praised
as new and exciting the presentation was
engaging and interactive.
WordPress Jacksonville is growing and providing
more opportunities through the meetups
happening each month.

EWC and HBCU students are encouraged to find
groups that support WordCamp, WordPress, EdCamp,
BarCamp and other opportunities for networking and
learning.
If HBCU students want to be involved in areas of tech
or even as entrepreneurs they still have to have access
to knowledge, resources, venture capitalists that make
the much needed  investments and have the degrees
and certificates necessary to sit at the table where
the decisions are made.

The concept of “How to be Dope on Social Media and
Relevant” is the vision of William Jackson professor
with Edward Waters College, he teaches Educational
Technology, Social Media and STEM. Professor
Jackson provides a much needed experience and
knowledge to help EWC and HBCU students to grow
and be part of industries that claim there are no knowl-
edgeable nor capable students of color and culture.
Professor Jackson has 27 years as a public educator
and teaching at EWC since 2004, he attends national and
international conferences to speak on tech issues in many
cases that are directly related to people of color and
culture and supports hiring EWC and HBCU students.

Pro. Jackson is a national and international blogger
whose content is published in Canada, South Africa,
Nigeria and throughout the United States.
There are national WordCamp opportunities and EdCamp
for EWC and HBCU students in education programs
working to be educators in schools across the country.
Students take advantage of this chances to grow beyond
imagination.
Conference photos: 
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/WordCamp%20Jacksonville%202017/story

 

 

Resources:
Emma Kent, MA, MLIS
Librarian – Division of Academic Affairs
Twitter – @librariantiger

William Jackson, M.Edu
Social Media Visionary – My Quest To Teach
https://myquesttoteach.wordpress.com/
Twitter – @wmjackson
EdCamp Central
https://www.edcamp.org/
WordCamp Central
https://central.wordcamp.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 19, 2017

Investing in Women Is Always A Good Thing

 

 

Investing in Women
Is Always A Good Thing

by William Jackson
Edited by Terri Drummond
“Xplosion” – Saturday, April 29, 2017

A Conference for women by women
that focuses on holistic
empowerment. “A Breakthrough to a New You”
The terms Black Girls Rock, Black Girls are Dope, Black Girls are Lit,
Girls Rock and Girls Rule, the growing motto for girls and women of color,
culture and diversity represents the increases girls and women have about
their personal and collective power and influence.
The list of motto, inspirational quotes, digital high fives and
even fist bumps continues to grow representing the magic, momentum,
and mystery of women.

“I just love bossy women. I could be around them all day. To me,
bossy is not a pejorative term at all. It means somebody’s passionate
and engaged and ambitious and doesn’t mind leading.”
Amy Poehler, actress

The changing dynamic of societal influence has allowed the dopeness
and intellectual blessing that women possess to be shared, celebrated,
and provided doors of opportunities to be smashed open. “A Breakthrough
to a New You,” is appropriate and powerful as a holistic approach to
empowerment.
The glass ceilings put in place by those that do not have the best
interests of girls and women and even those that still want to confine
women to outdated colonial thinking are fading away just as stereotypical
thinking is lost to history.

Bias against women is evaporating because the limited thinking of men trying
to keep women in “their place” has died and the fueling of intellectual
fire, creativity, innovation is growing faster because of the access to
educational, business, economic and entrepreneurial opportunities.

Self-awareness is a beautiful thing, self determination is a powerful
ability and cultivating collaborations allow women to explore new
opportunities of growth and liberty.

“Define success on your own terms, achieve it by your own rules,
and build a life you’re proud to live.” Anne Sweeney, Walt Disney

Gone is the era where women are tolerated, seen as second class citizens
and lower level partners. Because of educational opportunties, exposure
to new industries, access to finances and open global commerce women
are game changers not just locally in their communities, they have
national and international access to resources that where unheard of
just decades before.

Women are changing the dynamic of entrepreneurial development, there
are more women who are changing the definition of success because
more women understand the importance and value of independent thinking
and casting away the fears of failure. The greater fear is that of not
trying at all. Holistically women apply their faith, their intellegence,
their knowledge the willingness to collaborate and build professional
business networks. This builds into dynamically holistic engagement
and unity. Professional Learning Networks and Professional Learning
Communities help build the abilities of women to become thought
leaders, innovators and smart creatives as business leaders and
entrepreurial role models.

“My philosophy is that not only are you responsible for your life,
but doing the best at this moment puts you in the best place for the
next moment.” Oprah Winfrey

Invitations are extended to women that want to be involved and connected
in the “Xplosion” of knowlede, experience, passion and unity. Stated
eloquently by W.E.B. Dubois, “There is no force equal to a women
determined to rise.”

Rise women rise!!!!!
For more information:
Email: info@xplosion2017.com
Phone: 904 479 6638

April 12, 2017

What Do You Do Before High School Graduation 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Do You Do Before
High School Graduation 2017

William Jackson, M.Ed. – Edward Waters College
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

These suggestions are to help as graduation gets closer.
Graduation, an end to an educational journey from Day
Care to High School. Before this momentous occasion
parents need to make sure all the I’s are dotted and
T’s crossed to make a smooth closure to a long journey.
These are just a few suggestions from my experiences as
a parent and a teacher.
Parents make sure your child has enough credits to
graduate and has a “diploma” not a “certificate of
completion”.

Make sure your child understands that their journey
in public education maybe coming to a conclusion,
learning does not end there. It is a continuous
life-long process, ask anyone that is successful,
successful in their career and working in a “real”
career not just a job.

 

 

 

 

1. Make sure you obtain the most recent high
school “official” transcript to send too schools
or potential employers. Many organizations,
schools and groups require a transcript to see
if academically students are “qualified” to be
eligible. The world is highly competitive and
education is the key to achievement and
advancement.

2. Make sure you have current and up to date
medical and dental records. Even after graduating
from high school students are still dependent
on their parents for certain medical services.
Parents must understand “their” graduate is not
an adult yet, they are still maturing, learning
and growing.
There is some information and documentation only
parents can obtain until children are 21 or even
25. As a parent of a 25 and 21 year old, I still
in some cases support my children outside of
money.

3. Make sure there are boundaries and expectations
on behaviors, actions, and even responsibilities
in the home for the soon to be graduates. There
should be mutual understanding on everyone’s duties
and responsibilities and always respect. Stop
telling your child they are “grown” until they are
out of your house and working independently.
Even that is not a guarantee that they will not
need some support until they are established and
able to support themselves.

4. Talk to your child’s teacher(s) about internships,
scholarships, summer employment and community
projects. Do not accept the words, “I got this,”
as being responsible and accountable. Parents end
up paying more in the long run, keep informed and
stay on your child unless they show responsibility.

5. Make hair, nail or beauty appointments months
before May to avoid the rush and chaos of getting
your child ready. Young men need to also reserve
haircuts, shaves, and clothing appointments.

6. Remind your child of the two institutions that want their
attendance Correctional (Prison) and Instructional (Higher
Education) and to make wise decisions even after graduation.
The closer it get to graduation sometimes kids lose touch
with reality and get “stupid” and maybe even “ignant” as
some seasoned seniors would say.

7. Check your child’s academic (Cumulative) folder for items
that may delay graduation or entrance into college, trade
school or the military. You have a right to see their
records and ask questions and if not provided seek an
attorney for help. Don’t wait for the last weeks to make
demands. It makes that person look like a fool because
there are 180 days in the school year, why did you wait.
Check for discipline referrals, changed grades, teacher
notes, etc. All documentation is important.

8. Make sure all deposits and fees are paid in full
before graduation. Check for lost books, needed forms
and other items that should be completed. Do not trust
your child unless they show they are responsible.
“I got this” are the words that put gray hairs
in more parents hairs because something will be
undone that costs money.

9. Know what your child’s GPA is, weighted or un-weighted.

10. Make sure your child takes or has taken the SAT
and the ACT several times.
Many schools only require one, but better safe
than sorry.

11. Check on Bright Futures scholarship information.
Many HBCU’s accept ACT scores that show your child’s
academic success and potential for future success.
Use whichever gives you a better chance of getting
into college and this may affect monies. Check athletic
scholarships, make sure it is a full ride or partial.
Does it cover books and incidentals?

12. Work on your child’s Marketable skills to help
them network and grow. Get them involved in community
events before they need community service hours, not
rushing to beg people to help and the child does not
learn anything from their experiences.

13. Set Academic, Professional, Monetary and Career
goals now so your child will have a flexible plan
of attack when they graduate.

14. Have your child volunteer consistently, stay
involved in your community, and church. Volunteer
hours can still help with networking and build
marketable skills to use later.

15. Search online and inquire with local businesses
about summer internships paid and unpaid. Your time
is valuable so unpaid is important also.

19. Join local business organizations like
Chamber of Commerce to gain marketable skills
and get a jump on career goals.

20. Participate in church events and activities
helps build your resume or CV curriculum vitae.

21. Take college tours, visiting the school
environment to make sure you are familiar with
college or even the military.

22. Social Media entries; post POSITIVE content,
pictures, text and video. Your e-Reputation and
e-Personalities tell a story about you. Social
Media content will define you and may be your
first representation of you to others.

23. Register with LinkedIn to start networking
and connecting. There is a NEW LinkedIn for
students. https://students.linkedin.com/

24. Continue to research educational options
and inquire even now about Masters and
Doctorial programs.

25. Make sure you and your child understand
what type of diploma they will have. It is
painful to expect a High School Diploma and
receive a Certificate of Attendance,
Certificate of Completion, an ESE Diploma or
others.

26. On Social Media unfriend and even block
those that are openly using drugs, weapons
and involved in criminal actions. You may be
“guilty by association” by having them part
of your network.

27. Have a “real” Social Security card, and Birth
Certificate, and if necessary a Visa to travel
abroad. Many high school students and those going
to college are even getting passports.

28. Check with your local police department to make
sure there are no records of mistaken criminal
activity from someone impersonating you or looks
like you.

29. Financial Aid and Scholarship Information can
be found online.
https://twitter.com/prepforcollege
@prepforcollege (Twitter) #CollegeChat,

30. Google and Hashtag yourself to “see” what is
online about yourself to be prepared for questions
of activities and events that your involved in.

31. Contact teachers and other professionals that
you may need letters of recommendations from them.
This is one reason why children need to be
taught to respect and honor adults because it is
the right thing to do and they WILL need their help.

32. Teach your children to be humble, approachable,
honest, responsible and accountable for their
actions. The world is sometimes an unforgiving
place and if mistakes are made sometimes an
apology is accepted, but if one is not given
that can be counted against them.

Parents sometimes it is hard to accept that the
apple does not fall far from the tree. So take
extra care to support your child to build
their confidence, to be proactive and
responsible.

The world has changed, being prepared means
being a well-rounded individual with people
skills, confidence and that understanding that
the world is based on global competition.
Teach your children early about the value of
having an education and being a life-long learner.

If interested in getting into business for girls,
young women and adult women Xplosion 2017
is for  you…

 

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