My Quest To Teach

May 22, 2017

EWC and HBCU Students Should Be Attending WordCamps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EWC and HBCU Students
Should Be Attending WordCamps

by William Jackson @wmjackson
Emma Kent @librarianewc

The WordCamp Jacksonville was a prime opportunity
for EWC and HBCU students to meet and interact with
industry professionals in the fields of web development,
graphic design, Java development, Cybersecurity and
other areas of Branding, Marketing, Advertising and
business ventures in the area of tech.
The opportunity to share their voices through tech
has never been available before in history for EWC and
HBCU students.

Emma Kent, MA, MLIS librarian of Edward Waters
College attending her first WordCamp shared the
historical importance of EWC and HBCU students to
continue to grow and be engaged is as many tech
conferences like WordCamp Jacksonville. Ms. Kent
talking to the industry leaders, developers, bloggers,
programmers, etc.

Social Media has moved beyond the traditional
blogging into a broader spectrum of interactive
engagement, connectivity, Branding, Marketing,
find a person’s Niche and even collaborations in business.
The levels of engagement, interactivity and networking
is valuable for EWC students that have dreams of
moving into new areas of careers in technology, but do
not know who to connect with.

This is a big challenge, HBCU students do not think
conferences, meetups, workshop and networking events
are important, but are dangerously wrong.
Meetups, conferences, summits, workshops and
other events are important to understand who to
connect with, where to go to connect and the
value of getting your name in the minds of
professionals that can offer Internships, scholarships,
jobs and open doors that were once closed.
Emma Kent and William Jackson, Presenters

 

 

 

The presentation
“How to be DOPE on Social Media and Relevant,”
was celebrated as bringing a diversity of
content and cultural connections. Praised
as new and exciting the presentation was
engaging and interactive.
WordPress Jacksonville is growing and providing
more opportunities through the meetups
happening each month.

EWC and HBCU students are encouraged to find
groups that support WordCamp, WordPress, EdCamp,
BarCamp and other opportunities for networking and
learning.
If HBCU students want to be involved in areas of tech
or even as entrepreneurs they still have to have access
to knowledge, resources, venture capitalists that make
the much needed  investments and have the degrees
and certificates necessary to sit at the table where
the decisions are made.

The concept of “How to be Dope on Social Media and
Relevant” is the vision of William Jackson professor
with Edward Waters College, he teaches Educational
Technology, Social Media and STEM. Professor
Jackson provides a much needed experience and
knowledge to help EWC and HBCU students to grow
and be part of industries that claim there are no knowl-
edgeable nor capable students of color and culture.
Professor Jackson has 27 years as a public educator
and teaching at EWC since 2004, he attends national and
international conferences to speak on tech issues in many
cases that are directly related to people of color and
culture and supports hiring EWC and HBCU students.

Pro. Jackson is a national and international blogger
whose content is published in Canada, South Africa,
Nigeria and throughout the United States.
There are national WordCamp opportunities and EdCamp
for EWC and HBCU students in education programs
working to be educators in schools across the country.
Students take advantage of this chances to grow beyond
imagination.
Conference photos: 
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/WordCamp%20Jacksonville%202017/story

 

 

Resources:
Emma Kent, MA, MLIS
Librarian – Division of Academic Affairs
Twitter – @librariantiger

William Jackson, M.Edu
Social Media Visionary – My Quest To Teach
https://myquesttoteach.wordpress.com/
Twitter – @wmjackson
EdCamp Central
https://www.edcamp.org/
WordCamp Central
https://central.wordcamp.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 24, 2017

When You Educate Women You Educate Generations

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When You Educate Women You Educate Generations
by William Jackson, #MyQuestToTeach
STEM and STEAM Advocate

The goal of education is not to just educate that specific
person, it is a goal to educate generations that come
afterwards. Establishing education as a foundation to
achieve success can be seen when families continue to
send their children to higher educational institutions,
vocational school and even military service to work
towards a level of degree in the service of their country.

The past decade has seen an increase in careers that
require technical skill, certificates and diplomas. At the
forefront are women that see these as stable careers
to raise a family and have access to the benefits
that they may not have had from their parents. Families
of color are beginning to encourage their children to
think out of the cultural box and aim for the stars,
the seas and medical professions that explore
the inner spaces of the human bodies.

STEM, STEAM, STREAM are seen as the gateways
to achieving the American Dream and dreams that
are deferred because of social-economic situations.
The increase in mentoring groups is exposing
girls and young women to careers not thought
of that require higher order thinking, problem
solving, critical thinking, thought leadership,
creativity and out of the box developmental
abilities that foresee future challenges that
may threaten humanity on local, national
or international levels.

When you educate a mother your educating a generation
because mothers will continue to open the minds of her
children and her children’s children. Fathers provide
the support systems and help build foundations. The
recent Markerspace presentation at the Jacksonville
Public Library “STEAM INTO STEM” brought together
women in Jacksonville, Florida that show the diversity
of parenting, careers, business applications, educational
levels and entrepreneurialism.

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Jax Markerspace panelists:
Shawanna Brooks, the hostesses, Akia Uwanda, Latonja Richardson,
Princess S. Rashid, and Angie Nixon. Each woman involved in
Jacksonville as community activist, business leaders and have
children in the schools systems of Jacksonville either public
or private.
The aspirations are the same for academic success, the goal of
graduating their children from high school and attending higher
education is similar, but the roads to achievements are
diverse and different. Each women are successful in their own
ways, are unified in their goals for their children to be better
educated and have better access to the resources that are open
in today with the integration and implementation of technologies
that involve STEAM INTO STEM.

Trans-formative statements: “The biggest danger of unemployment
today is not of immigration it is the advancements of technology
in robotics,” made by Princess S. Rashid a Physicist, educator,
parent and Artist. This shows that science can embrace the Arts,
there is coexistence.  The blending of STEAM and building a
relationship with careers comes into place when Angie Nixon
and Latonjay Richardson comment that the holistic approach
to education comes to play that children will not change if they
continue to be limited by their environments. The value of
exposure and relevance is real when education is applied to
careers and the changing of the mental and relevancy of what
is learned when applied in real life.

The FIRST LEGO LEAGUE, is the dream of Mark McCombs,
“I teach people how to build robots and to do what they used
to think was impossible.” Mark McCombs is the visionary of the
FIRST LEGO League competitions going on at middle and high
schools across the state of Florida . This creates dynamic
opportunities for team building in youth, teens and young adults.

Engineering, building and coding of robotics that are involved
in competitions and can be applied to real world or off world
future exploration. Women are playing key roles in these areas,
looking at the recent Hidden Figures movie that careers in NASA
and other aerospace, inner space, space travel and applied careers
are the keys for generational success academically and culturally.

STEM, STEAM and STREAM are not just acronyms to decipher
they are Real, Relevant and Ready to help youth, teens and young
adults reach their dreams and beyond. Parents check your child’s
school to see if they have a STEM or STEAM curriculum that builds
your child to reach beyond their potential and abilities. Never put
limits on the learning of your children or you will limit their
abilities to take care of themselves and their children.
Generations depend on the advancements of the children now.
If your children do not know how to aim, how will they aim
high for success?
Resources:
Jacksonville Public Library:
http://jaxpubliclibrary.org/

 

April 12, 2017

What Do You Do Before High School Graduation 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Do You Do Before
High School Graduation 2017

William Jackson, M.Ed. – Edward Waters College
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

These suggestions are to help as graduation gets closer.
Graduation, an end to an educational journey from Day
Care to High School. Before this momentous occasion
parents need to make sure all the I’s are dotted and
T’s crossed to make a smooth closure to a long journey.
These are just a few suggestions from my experiences as
a parent and a teacher.
Parents make sure your child has enough credits to
graduate and has a “diploma” not a “certificate of
completion”.

Make sure your child understands that their journey
in public education maybe coming to a conclusion,
learning does not end there. It is a continuous
life-long process, ask anyone that is successful,
successful in their career and working in a “real”
career not just a job.

 

 

 

 

1. Make sure you obtain the most recent high
school “official” transcript to send too schools
or potential employers. Many organizations,
schools and groups require a transcript to see
if academically students are “qualified” to be
eligible. The world is highly competitive and
education is the key to achievement and
advancement.

2. Make sure you have current and up to date
medical and dental records. Even after graduating
from high school students are still dependent
on their parents for certain medical services.
Parents must understand “their” graduate is not
an adult yet, they are still maturing, learning
and growing.
There is some information and documentation only
parents can obtain until children are 21 or even
25. As a parent of a 25 and 21 year old, I still
in some cases support my children outside of
money.

3. Make sure there are boundaries and expectations
on behaviors, actions, and even responsibilities
in the home for the soon to be graduates. There
should be mutual understanding on everyone’s duties
and responsibilities and always respect. Stop
telling your child they are “grown” until they are
out of your house and working independently.
Even that is not a guarantee that they will not
need some support until they are established and
able to support themselves.

4. Talk to your child’s teacher(s) about internships,
scholarships, summer employment and community
projects. Do not accept the words, “I got this,”
as being responsible and accountable. Parents end
up paying more in the long run, keep informed and
stay on your child unless they show responsibility.

5. Make hair, nail or beauty appointments months
before May to avoid the rush and chaos of getting
your child ready. Young men need to also reserve
haircuts, shaves, and clothing appointments.

6. Remind your child of the two institutions that want their
attendance Correctional (Prison) and Instructional (Higher
Education) and to make wise decisions even after graduation.
The closer it get to graduation sometimes kids lose touch
with reality and get “stupid” and maybe even “ignant” as
some seasoned seniors would say.

7. Check your child’s academic (Cumulative) folder for items
that may delay graduation or entrance into college, trade
school or the military. You have a right to see their
records and ask questions and if not provided seek an
attorney for help. Don’t wait for the last weeks to make
demands. It makes that person look like a fool because
there are 180 days in the school year, why did you wait.
Check for discipline referrals, changed grades, teacher
notes, etc. All documentation is important.

8. Make sure all deposits and fees are paid in full
before graduation. Check for lost books, needed forms
and other items that should be completed. Do not trust
your child unless they show they are responsible.
“I got this” are the words that put gray hairs
in more parents hairs because something will be
undone that costs money.

9. Know what your child’s GPA is, weighted or un-weighted.

10. Make sure your child takes or has taken the SAT
and the ACT several times.
Many schools only require one, but better safe
than sorry.

11. Check on Bright Futures scholarship information.
Many HBCU’s accept ACT scores that show your child’s
academic success and potential for future success.
Use whichever gives you a better chance of getting
into college and this may affect monies. Check athletic
scholarships, make sure it is a full ride or partial.
Does it cover books and incidentals?

12. Work on your child’s Marketable skills to help
them network and grow. Get them involved in community
events before they need community service hours, not
rushing to beg people to help and the child does not
learn anything from their experiences.

13. Set Academic, Professional, Monetary and Career
goals now so your child will have a flexible plan
of attack when they graduate.

14. Have your child volunteer consistently, stay
involved in your community, and church. Volunteer
hours can still help with networking and build
marketable skills to use later.

15. Search online and inquire with local businesses
about summer internships paid and unpaid. Your time
is valuable so unpaid is important also.

19. Join local business organizations like
Chamber of Commerce to gain marketable skills
and get a jump on career goals.

20. Participate in church events and activities
helps build your resume or CV curriculum vitae.

21. Take college tours, visiting the school
environment to make sure you are familiar with
college or even the military.

22. Social Media entries; post POSITIVE content,
pictures, text and video. Your e-Reputation and
e-Personalities tell a story about you. Social
Media content will define you and may be your
first representation of you to others.

23. Register with LinkedIn to start networking
and connecting. There is a NEW LinkedIn for
students. https://students.linkedin.com/

24. Continue to research educational options
and inquire even now about Masters and
Doctorial programs.

25. Make sure you and your child understand
what type of diploma they will have. It is
painful to expect a High School Diploma and
receive a Certificate of Attendance,
Certificate of Completion, an ESE Diploma or
others.

26. On Social Media unfriend and even block
those that are openly using drugs, weapons
and involved in criminal actions. You may be
“guilty by association” by having them part
of your network.

27. Have a “real” Social Security card, and Birth
Certificate, and if necessary a Visa to travel
abroad. Many high school students and those going
to college are even getting passports.

28. Check with your local police department to make
sure there are no records of mistaken criminal
activity from someone impersonating you or looks
like you.

29. Financial Aid and Scholarship Information can
be found online.
https://twitter.com/prepforcollege
@prepforcollege (Twitter) #CollegeChat,

30. Google and Hashtag yourself to “see” what is
online about yourself to be prepared for questions
of activities and events that your involved in.

31. Contact teachers and other professionals that
you may need letters of recommendations from them.
This is one reason why children need to be
taught to respect and honor adults because it is
the right thing to do and they WILL need their help.

32. Teach your children to be humble, approachable,
honest, responsible and accountable for their
actions. The world is sometimes an unforgiving
place and if mistakes are made sometimes an
apology is accepted, but if one is not given
that can be counted against them.

Parents sometimes it is hard to accept that the
apple does not fall far from the tree. So take
extra care to support your child to build
their confidence, to be proactive and
responsible.

The world has changed, being prepared means
being a well-rounded individual with people
skills, confidence and that understanding that
the world is based on global competition.
Teach your children early about the value of
having an education and being a life-long learner.

If interested in getting into business for girls,
young women and adult women Xplosion 2017
is for  you…

 

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