My Quest To Teach

June 2, 2017

Branding Techniques for HBCU Students

20170309_163633EWC students in Educational Technology must keep a blog active .

Branding Techniques for HBCU Students
by William Jackson
Social Media Visionary for My Quest To Teach
Inspired by “Knockout Branding Techniques”
Bridget N. Armstrong, Black Enterprise 2009

Competition is tough, the fields of study in higher
education need to be mapped out because competition
is not only local it is natioanl and international.
HBCU students continue to face a serious delima in
their approach to relavent and stable career choices.

Educational opportunities have never been more
accessable and equitable, but globally our world
economy has created increased competition.
When I say equitable, todays students have access
to the best resource in history, the World Wide Web
and connected databases, historical literature,
publications from globally and even experts in their
career fields.

Never before in history have students had access to
global learning opportunties that allow for unpresidented
learning and networking. The trick is to get students
to see it, understand it and apply that learning.
Teaching the skills of reading for comprehension is
important even in higher education.

HBCU students during their college careers should
be developing their Brands and their personal Niches.
They, HBCU students need to understand what an
entrepreneur is because the majority of them are and
the value to the process of networking and true
to the meaning of pressing the flesh to be the best
should be taught.

In my Educational Technology, Social Media and STEM
class, too many students even senior did not know what
STEM, STEAM and STREAM where, what PLC – Professional
Learning Communities and PLN – Professional Learning
Networks are and how they work. PLN’s online like
#EduMatch, #FlEdChat, #UrbanEdChat and others where
professionals speak honestly about their careers in
unfiltered ways. Providing best practices, strategies,
knowledge based skills to work smarter.

HBCU juniors and seniors should know the top 5 people
in their course of study, they should know the
educational requirements and where to find advice on
what Social Media platform for jobs, internships and
where is the best place to be hired. There is no time
for being silly or even stupid when you have a tool
that can spread your Brand instantly around the world.

This information is necessary for building a successful
foundation to grow and create professional and
personal stability. To go along with careers, HBCU
students must be unique and original by building a
position for themselves online and offline. Creating
and re-creating to establish their credibility in
E- reputations, E-personalities, E-Branding and what
the Niche will be.

20170309_162931
EWC students must develop strategies to build their Brand and Marketing agenda

Asking these questions about how people see you, do people
see you as an innovator, creator, developer, community
activist. How diverse is your network of associates and
who you can call on for ideas and resources. Can you
“Codeswitch” in diverse environments and feel comfortable
about not losing yourself. Do you know if your an extrovert
or an introvert? Are you a thought leader or are you
cognitively complacent about community issues because you
have your success and everyone else needs to get theirs?

The world if full of diversity and requires situational
awareness. What tools do you have to handle stress,
set-backs, break-downs and even how to manage success?
HBCU students will face many challenges, so their preparation
must be strategic and applied to real life. Finding a mentor
to talk to, share ideas with and to have a person to vent
is important. HBCU students must develop a personal winners
reputation because every Brand is based on the reputation
created. Think about the minds of your audience, potential
customers, clients and even the competition. Your focus
as a student is to create, plan and build a reputation that
sustains your Brand and allows it to grow and open more
opportunties in the future.

Use the summer months to attend conferences, workshops,
find a mentor, visit and participate in library events
and volunteer as much as possible to build your PLN in
your community and city. If you fail to take advantage
of these things you may be missing out on internships,
scholarships and business opportunties that others will
take advantage of and grow from.

You are your own worst enemy and your own best marketing
tool.

 

20170427_162324

The diversity of EWC brings in depth and experiences from exposure, cultural growth
and sharing of ideas. Respect, acceptance, Codeswitching, collaboration, cooperation and
tolerance are key words that should be applied.

May 22, 2017

EWC and HBCU Students Should Be Attending WordCamps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EWC and HBCU Students
Should Be Attending WordCamps

by William Jackson @wmjackson
Emma Kent @librarianewc

The WordCamp Jacksonville was a prime opportunity
for EWC and HBCU students to meet and interact with
industry professionals in the fields of web development,
graphic design, Java development, Cybersecurity and
other areas of Branding, Marketing, Advertising and
business ventures in the area of tech.
The opportunity to share their voices through tech
has never been available before in history for EWC and
HBCU students.

Emma Kent, MA, MLIS librarian of Edward Waters
College attending her first WordCamp shared the
historical importance of EWC and HBCU students to
continue to grow and be engaged is as many tech
conferences like WordCamp Jacksonville. Ms. Kent
talking to the industry leaders, developers, bloggers,
programmers, etc.

Social Media has moved beyond the traditional
blogging into a broader spectrum of interactive
engagement, connectivity, Branding, Marketing,
find a person’s Niche and even collaborations in business.
The levels of engagement, interactivity and networking
is valuable for EWC students that have dreams of
moving into new areas of careers in technology, but do
not know who to connect with.

This is a big challenge, HBCU students do not think
conferences, meetups, workshop and networking events
are important, but are dangerously wrong.
Meetups, conferences, summits, workshops and
other events are important to understand who to
connect with, where to go to connect and the
value of getting your name in the minds of
professionals that can offer Internships, scholarships,
jobs and open doors that were once closed.
Emma Kent and William Jackson, Presenters

 

 

 

The presentation
“How to be DOPE on Social Media and Relevant,”
was celebrated as bringing a diversity of
content and cultural connections. Praised
as new and exciting the presentation was
engaging and interactive.
WordPress Jacksonville is growing and providing
more opportunities through the meetups
happening each month.

EWC and HBCU students are encouraged to find
groups that support WordCamp, WordPress, EdCamp,
BarCamp and other opportunities for networking and
learning.
If HBCU students want to be involved in areas of tech
or even as entrepreneurs they still have to have access
to knowledge, resources, venture capitalists that make
the much needed  investments and have the degrees
and certificates necessary to sit at the table where
the decisions are made.

The concept of “How to be Dope on Social Media and
Relevant” is the vision of William Jackson professor
with Edward Waters College, he teaches Educational
Technology, Social Media and STEM. Professor
Jackson provides a much needed experience and
knowledge to help EWC and HBCU students to grow
and be part of industries that claim there are no knowl-
edgeable nor capable students of color and culture.
Professor Jackson has 27 years as a public educator
and teaching at EWC since 2004, he attends national and
international conferences to speak on tech issues in many
cases that are directly related to people of color and
culture and supports hiring EWC and HBCU students.

Pro. Jackson is a national and international blogger
whose content is published in Canada, South Africa,
Nigeria and throughout the United States.
There are national WordCamp opportunities and EdCamp
for EWC and HBCU students in education programs
working to be educators in schools across the country.
Students take advantage of this chances to grow beyond
imagination.
Conference photos: 
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/WordCamp%20Jacksonville%202017/story

 

 

Resources:
Emma Kent, MA, MLIS
Librarian – Division of Academic Affairs
Twitter – @librariantiger

William Jackson, M.Edu
Social Media Visionary – My Quest To Teach
https://myquesttoteach.wordpress.com/
Twitter – @wmjackson
EdCamp Central
https://www.edcamp.org/
WordCamp Central
https://central.wordcamp.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 24, 2017

When You Educate Women You Educate Generations

20170412_163339

 

When You Educate Women You Educate Generations
by William Jackson, #MyQuestToTeach
STEM and STEAM Advocate

The goal of education is not to just educate that specific
person, it is a goal to educate generations that come
afterwards. Establishing education as a foundation to
achieve success can be seen when families continue to
send their children to higher educational institutions,
vocational school and even military service to work
towards a level of degree in the service of their country.

The past decade has seen an increase in careers that
require technical skill, certificates and diplomas. At the
forefront are women that see these as stable careers
to raise a family and have access to the benefits
that they may not have had from their parents. Families
of color are beginning to encourage their children to
think out of the cultural box and aim for the stars,
the seas and medical professions that explore
the inner spaces of the human bodies.

STEM, STEAM, STREAM are seen as the gateways
to achieving the American Dream and dreams that
are deferred because of social-economic situations.
The increase in mentoring groups is exposing
girls and young women to careers not thought
of that require higher order thinking, problem
solving, critical thinking, thought leadership,
creativity and out of the box developmental
abilities that foresee future challenges that
may threaten humanity on local, national
or international levels.

When you educate a mother your educating a generation
because mothers will continue to open the minds of her
children and her children’s children. Fathers provide
the support systems and help build foundations. The
recent Markerspace presentation at the Jacksonville
Public Library “STEAM INTO STEM” brought together
women in Jacksonville, Florida that show the diversity
of parenting, careers, business applications, educational
levels and entrepreneurialism.

20170412_172752

Jax Markerspace panelists:
Shawanna Brooks, the hostesses, Akia Uwanda, Latonja Richardson,
Princess S. Rashid, and Angie Nixon. Each woman involved in
Jacksonville as community activist, business leaders and have
children in the schools systems of Jacksonville either public
or private.
The aspirations are the same for academic success, the goal of
graduating their children from high school and attending higher
education is similar, but the roads to achievements are
diverse and different. Each women are successful in their own
ways, are unified in their goals for their children to be better
educated and have better access to the resources that are open
in today with the integration and implementation of technologies
that involve STEAM INTO STEM.

Trans-formative statements: “The biggest danger of unemployment
today is not of immigration it is the advancements of technology
in robotics,” made by Princess S. Rashid a Physicist, educator,
parent and Artist. This shows that science can embrace the Arts,
there is coexistence.  The blending of STEAM and building a
relationship with careers comes into place when Angie Nixon
and Latonjay Richardson comment that the holistic approach
to education comes to play that children will not change if they
continue to be limited by their environments. The value of
exposure and relevance is real when education is applied to
careers and the changing of the mental and relevancy of what
is learned when applied in real life.

The FIRST LEGO LEAGUE, is the dream of Mark McCombs,
“I teach people how to build robots and to do what they used
to think was impossible.” Mark McCombs is the visionary of the
FIRST LEGO League competitions going on at middle and high
schools across the state of Florida . This creates dynamic
opportunities for team building in youth, teens and young adults.

Engineering, building and coding of robotics that are involved
in competitions and can be applied to real world or off world
future exploration. Women are playing key roles in these areas,
looking at the recent Hidden Figures movie that careers in NASA
and other aerospace, inner space, space travel and applied careers
are the keys for generational success academically and culturally.

STEM, STEAM and STREAM are not just acronyms to decipher
they are Real, Relevant and Ready to help youth, teens and young
adults reach their dreams and beyond. Parents check your child’s
school to see if they have a STEM or STEAM curriculum that builds
your child to reach beyond their potential and abilities. Never put
limits on the learning of your children or you will limit their
abilities to take care of themselves and their children.
Generations depend on the advancements of the children now.
If your children do not know how to aim, how will they aim
high for success?
Resources:
Jacksonville Public Library:
http://jaxpubliclibrary.org/

 

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: