My Quest To Teach

May 31, 2017

Women of Color and Culture Need To Start Businesses

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Women of Color and Culture Need To Start Businesses
by William Jackson
Social Media Visionary “My Quest To Teach”

“Xplosion 2017 A Break Through to a New You”

“There has never been a quiet Xplosion – live life!!!”
Terri Drummond, Community Activist and Entrepreneur

The ability to make significant changes in homes, communities,
or even in cities must be accomplished through education and
business involvement. Being an entrepreneur offers the
opportunity to create not just financial stability, it creates
opportunities for generational financial stability and continued
successes.
The recent “Xplosion 2017: A Breakthrough to a New You”
summit has shown that women of color and culture can be
successful in business and being entrepreneurs.
To have progress people must have control of their finances,
they must be able to determine where their monies are going
and what to invest in to make qualitative and quantitative
change.

Present at the summit where over 50 women that earned
higher educational degrees and involved in some form of
business and entrepreneurialism. Attending also where
young women with dreams of owning their own business,
not just working for someone else.

The Keynote speaker Dr. Monekka Munroe, Virginia Union
University, TEDx Speaker, and CEO of Great Minds Publishing
shared her educational and professional journey.
Achieving educational success and business success are only
accessible through determination, having a plan and the under-
standing that you must set goals, monitor your associations,
value education and learning. Life is a life-long journey of living
and learning.

The “Xplosion 2017: A Breakthrough to a New You” allowed
women to share their testimonies of having to overcome
challenges from family issues, educational challenges and
even medical challenges that may strike unexpectedly.
The importance of a strong prayer life and walking with a
purpose are fundamental keys to remaining mentally and
spiritually stable.

The summit encouraged the opportunity of unity and
collaboration of future projects and initiatives that will
benefit more families in their respective communities.
Business cards were readily shared to provide a platform
of community resources that showed economic strength
and the influence of commerce.

“You gain strength, courage and confidence by every
experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.”
Eleanor Roosevelt #WomenInBusiness #BlackGirlsRock

Women have historically been denied access to the resources
to build their dreams, education provides the necessary
mental materials to understand the process and purpose of
how to start, manage and expand a business. Stated several
times that women are already great managers because  they
understand how to balance a family, organization and planning
are key, long range goals and the implementation of strategies
to move from week to week or month to month are required.

A successful home is only accomplished from proper
planning and scheduling, women are trained already
by their mothers, grandmothers and even aunties that
inherently pass this knowledge down through the
generations. Transferring these skills into a business is
second nature.

The workshops provided by veteran entrepreneurs
and business leaders ranged from how to start a
business, to the passion needed to sustain a business,
to personal challenges of finance, investment, family
contributions and hindrances.

Presented was a fashion show by Yvonne Cooney, feat.
Traci Lynn Jewelry. Vendors styled and profiled their
products and services to those attending. Events like
this are not just a quick hit, they are expanding the
opportunities for women to grow because they provide
a professional learning network of women that are
like minded and passion driven. The access to pro-
fessional learning communities that offer mentorship
and role models.

“Entrepreneurship is the last refuge of the trouble
making individual.” – Natalie Clifford Barney
One of the embers to spark the fire of discussion of why
women should go into business and to become entre-
preneurs is that fear can keep you from working towards
your dreams. Stated several times, “Your past can paralyze
you or propel you,” women should not allow their past
mistakes in relationships, finances and other business
ventures to stop them from working towards their goals.

They are the engineers of their future successes and
accomplishments. No one can share their passion and
excitement because it is within them like birthing a child.
The pain is worth the outcome……

Wyatt Reid – Edward Waters College Student
“Trust- trust in your brand as well as trust through
the community. With trust you can build a successful
organization and team. Trust takes time and you need
to define who you are. Develop your culture and allow
you to take off…”

The relationships formed and the trusts gained that
each person is a support system could be seen and
felt. There are increasing women businesses that are
influencing communities and generations.

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Resources:
Xplosion 2017 Photos via William Jackson
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/
williamdjackson/Xplosion%202017/story

Why Blacks Have To Start Businesses
a serious discussion on why Blacks need to
have businesses to influence commerce and
build generational stability.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALEodaehZfw

 

May 22, 2017

EWC and HBCU Students Should Be Attending WordCamps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EWC and HBCU Students
Should Be Attending WordCamps

by William Jackson @wmjackson
Emma Kent @librarianewc

The WordCamp Jacksonville was a prime opportunity
for EWC and HBCU students to meet and interact with
industry professionals in the fields of web development,
graphic design, Java development, Cybersecurity and
other areas of Branding, Marketing, Advertising and
business ventures in the area of tech.
The opportunity to share their voices through tech
has never been available before in history for EWC and
HBCU students.

Emma Kent, MA, MLIS librarian of Edward Waters
College attending her first WordCamp shared the
historical importance of EWC and HBCU students to
continue to grow and be engaged is as many tech
conferences like WordCamp Jacksonville. Ms. Kent
talking to the industry leaders, developers, bloggers,
programmers, etc.

Social Media has moved beyond the traditional
blogging into a broader spectrum of interactive
engagement, connectivity, Branding, Marketing,
find a person’s Niche and even collaborations in business.
The levels of engagement, interactivity and networking
is valuable for EWC students that have dreams of
moving into new areas of careers in technology, but do
not know who to connect with.

This is a big challenge, HBCU students do not think
conferences, meetups, workshop and networking events
are important, but are dangerously wrong.
Meetups, conferences, summits, workshops and
other events are important to understand who to
connect with, where to go to connect and the
value of getting your name in the minds of
professionals that can offer Internships, scholarships,
jobs and open doors that were once closed.
Emma Kent and William Jackson, Presenters

 

 

 

The presentation
“How to be DOPE on Social Media and Relevant,”
was celebrated as bringing a diversity of
content and cultural connections. Praised
as new and exciting the presentation was
engaging and interactive.
WordPress Jacksonville is growing and providing
more opportunities through the meetups
happening each month.

EWC and HBCU students are encouraged to find
groups that support WordCamp, WordPress, EdCamp,
BarCamp and other opportunities for networking and
learning.
If HBCU students want to be involved in areas of tech
or even as entrepreneurs they still have to have access
to knowledge, resources, venture capitalists that make
the much needed  investments and have the degrees
and certificates necessary to sit at the table where
the decisions are made.

The concept of “How to be Dope on Social Media and
Relevant” is the vision of William Jackson professor
with Edward Waters College, he teaches Educational
Technology, Social Media and STEM. Professor
Jackson provides a much needed experience and
knowledge to help EWC and HBCU students to grow
and be part of industries that claim there are no knowl-
edgeable nor capable students of color and culture.
Professor Jackson has 27 years as a public educator
and teaching at EWC since 2004, he attends national and
international conferences to speak on tech issues in many
cases that are directly related to people of color and
culture and supports hiring EWC and HBCU students.

Pro. Jackson is a national and international blogger
whose content is published in Canada, South Africa,
Nigeria and throughout the United States.
There are national WordCamp opportunities and EdCamp
for EWC and HBCU students in education programs
working to be educators in schools across the country.
Students take advantage of this chances to grow beyond
imagination.
Conference photos: 
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/WordCamp%20Jacksonville%202017/story

 

 

Resources:
Emma Kent, MA, MLIS
Librarian – Division of Academic Affairs
Twitter – @librariantiger

William Jackson, M.Edu
Social Media Visionary – My Quest To Teach
https://myquesttoteach.wordpress.com/
Twitter – @wmjackson
EdCamp Central
https://www.edcamp.org/
WordCamp Central
https://central.wordcamp.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 30, 2017

POWHERFUL Women and BROTHERHOOD of MEN

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POWHERFUL Women and BROTHERHOOD of MEN
Girl Version 

by William Jackson
Twitter @wmjackson
Blogging #MyQuestToTeach

The recent summits for teen and young adults in Jacksonville
shows that the community understands the need for engagement
with young ladies and young men of this city and Northeast
Florida.
To build leaders, strengthen community, encourage personal
self-esteem and the importance of applied educational knowledge
to help young ladies and young men build into leaders and
activists.
High schools; private, public and charter were represented
well by the participants that showed young people in Jacksonville
are among the best and brightest in the nation.
Both teen and young adult women and men need to understand the
value of applying their learning to potential careers and
future growth in economics, commerce, business, politics,
community services and as entrepreneurs that will run businesses
employing their peers.
Education is not just gained in school classrooms; networking
is a learned skill and having self-esteem, self-respect,
life goals and long term aspirations is vital.
The POWHERFUL and I CHOOSE BROTHERHOOD summits each empower
their unique audience of teens and young adults geared to
that audience. The diversity of attendance represents the
cultural diversity of Northeast Florida and that all cultures
are valuable and contibute to the success of our city.
Each summit had local and national influencers in a various
industries that draw local and national attention to issues
important to teens and young adults.
Summits like these touch on a broader audience and has
a ripple affect in teens and young adults becoming themselves
influencers and smart creatives in their community and schools.
The unique nature of each summit is that there were not gender
distractions. POWHERFUL was dedicated to young ladies and
I CHOOSE BROTHERHOOD dedicated to young men.
Jacksonville needs to continue to provide summits, workshops,
and conferences that focus on teens and young adult issues,
they cannot be ignored nor denied the constitutional rights
they are guaranteed of opportunities of speak and assembly.
Jacksonville is learning that issues are not settled by law
enforcement, laws, curfews or other legislative embargoes.
Children, youth, teens and young adults need interactive
engagement with the adults in their lives to talk about
the issues that are important to them.
As a parent, educator, mentor and community activist the best
results are gained by caring and showing that you do care about
young people by being engaged and active. Society can only be
best served when our children, teens and young adults know
that they can be seen and heard.

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Resources:
POWHERFUL – Instagram – Twitter – Facebook = @powherfulfdn
Soledad O’Brien, Starfish Foundation – Twitter @soledadobrien
Sheba Turk , News Anchor – Twitter @shebaturk
Akia Uwanda , Entertainer and Entrepreneur
FB – akiauwandaentertainer – Twitter – @akiauwanda

Videos:
Akia Uwanda how she started her career
https://youtu.be/eMLFq_Vs0AM
Blue Print for Success
https://youtu.be/lkI4TnMoy1Q
Financial Aid for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/rmDMpz0AGSU
First Step to get Money
https://youtu.be/JQIdQbKvbn8
Free Money for School
https://youtu.be/RMc0e2Mh2s8
Getting Loans for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/38Fjt7ITmas
How to Address Bullying In School
https://youtu.be/fr4NmN09WYM
Scholarships for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/sgyfi7cthtA
Starting A Music Career Akia Uwanda
https://youtu.be/gABGgFXpFKU
Starting Your Careers
https://youtu.be/cNI_lnSiXdY
The Stress of Bullying
https://youtu.be/PEfNaVqTzns

My Photos:
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/POWHERFUL%202017/story

 

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