My Quest To Teach

April 5, 2017

Black Girl Magic – Walking the Path as An Agent of STEAM

Black Girl Magic – Walking the Path as An Agent of STEAM
by William Jackson – @wmjackson Twitter

20170314_194219

“No idea is ever too small to start something big.
Nothing is impossible; it’s just a matter of hard
work and identifying the right opportunities.”
Eloine Barry Of African Media Agency

Many sororities are sharing inspiring stories of women
that are no longer Hidden Figures, they are pioneers
and innovators, they are visible and inspiring girls and
women to enter into new fields. They are role models
and mentors to build girls and women to stand on strong
shoulders to climb higher and fly further. Through STEM
education and STEAM integration women are taking
leadership roles and creating transformative changes in
society and are role models for girls following behind
them.

The women of AKA and the HBCU-Edward Waters College
recently held an inspirational panel discussion to
share the victories, challenges and inspiration of
Black Girl Magic and that Black Girls Do Rock in STEM.
The panel consisted of women that are engineers with
NASA, educators with the skills of mathematics and
community activists.

Pioneering the way for girls and women to see the poten-
tial of new ways to explore the planets, the oceans and
even inner space within the human body. STEM, STEAM
and even STREAM are the way to go for girls and boys,
men and women especially of color like
Taylor Richardson a real life Power Puff Girl hear her story:
https://www.facebook.com/hulu/videos/1408713792500385/

People of color especially  girls  and  boys of color and
culture are provided so many opportunities to grow beyond
the limited expectations of those that only see stereo-
types and looking through their biases. Still caught
in an era of separation of cultures and even genders.
This should stop, it is a time for unity to encourage
exploration and scientific discovery. To think and live
out of the boxes of poverty and unemployment.

20161217_163812
Natalie on the right…..

Natalie McGriff, Taylor Richardson, Deyona Burton are
examples influencing girls and women not just on a local
and national level, but on an international platform of
diversity and acceptance in the differences we have.
Girls have wonderful opportunities to chase their
dreams in fields once commanded by men. STEM, STREAM
and STEAM provide unlimited access to educational
equality, research and development opportunities.
Internships and scholarships that at one time where
only considered for males to fill. Now women are
qualifying for new careers that demand higher order
thinking, critical thinking, innovative thinking and
thinking out of the box strategies that tackle 21st
century challenges that our
society faces today and may face in the future.

group-pict
Elisha (left), unknown, Deyona(3rd from left)
Taylor (2nd from right), Jon right

Deyona Burton involved in her community and making
sure her future is clear in the areas of STEM she
is passionate in and guided by her mother who has
dreams of success and prosperity.

Ms. Richardson and others are showing that the
road is paved with success if the person is willing
to work hard in the classroom and in the community.
Astronaut StarBright (Taylor Richardson), inspiring
girls everywhere!!! Not just making excuses, but
working hard in school and the community.
https://www.facebook.com/bbcnews/videos/1275012832582927/

The shout and scream excitement is that girls  and
women are not limited any longer by their complacency
to better themselves. They do not have to wait on
a door to open, they do not have to wait on a man,
they are busting down doors, shattering glass
ceilings and creating their own innovative
initiatives that influence society and creating
their own movements and moments with urgency
and purpose. They are not settling for anything
in live, taking hold of each day with a passion,
purpose and potential to be leaders and innovators.

Moxie Girl and The Astronaut

The epitome of Black Girl Magic and Black Girls Rule
and Rock are girls that see the world differently, do
not limit themselves by anyone else’s standards.
They are making their own rules and raising the
standards. Just as little girls on the play grounds
chant, “girls rule and boys drool,” it is being produced
on many levels.
https://blavity.com/this-13-year-old-aspiring-astronaut-is-spreading-blackgirlmagic?utm_content=buffer2245c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Other girls to watch and follow that are promoting
literacy, education, positive self image and even
community activism.
The world claims it needs role models and they are
in plain site providing examples of excellence and
imagination.
The Adventures of Moxie Girl!
https://www.facebook.com/theadventuresofmoxiegirl/videos/1870167626553626/
The Adventure of Moxie Girl Facebook Page
https://www.facebook.com/theadventuresofmoxiegirl/
#25daysofMoxie Twitter and Facebook

What does strength have to do with it? Ask the women of
The Strength of SHE @strengthofshe – unity and sisterhood
that builds a coalition – “Empowering black women to
stay beautiful, healthy & love themselves” taken from
http://www.thestrengthofshe.com/
The growth of Black Girl Magic is not a singularity
it is more than a duality it is a culture and a
collective. Spanning generations and even connected in
the magnificence of innovation and creativity.

Black Girl Magic – Walking the Path as An Agent of STEAM
requires a vision for success, it demands planning and
learning how to be a visionary and to follow dreams that
seem impossible to others, they are just a walk in the
park for women of color and culture.

This blog is in dedication to the Black Girl Magic
that influences the world, that inspires, that engages
and even creates the fear of failure, but the will to
face any challenge. The demand for gender parity and
equality, for education to all girls and women of color
and culture, this is the age of
Black Girl Magic and Black Girls Rock the world.

Even on an international level on the continent of Africa
women are leading and changing the paradigm of mindsets
and entrepreneurialism. The development of women in a world
that cannot get out of the way of changes that are needed
and in many ways desired. These events even leads to Africa
where She Leads Africa explodes http://sheleadsafrica.com/

images

Resources:
Black Women as Doctors
Melanin, M.D. – @MelaninMD
1st & 2nd yr med students tweeting advice/inspiration for
premeds. Aiming to enrich medicine through diversity.
http://melaninmd.org/shop | melaninmd@gmail.com

Excited about the opportunity to send two local youths
from Jacksonville, FL, to Space Camp with the remaining
funds raised from the Hidden Figures movie initiative.
Check out the link below for more information on
Space Camp.
http://www.spacecamp.com

The applicant  must  be  between the ages of 12 – 16 and
write an essay on why he or she should go to
Space Camp.
The essay must be no more than 500 words.
All essays are due by April 15, 2017 and should be
“mailed” to:
Attn: Taylor Richardson
PO Box 54601
Jacksonville, FL 32245

No email essays will be accepted.
We will announce the winners mid May 2017.
Please be sure to check spelling, grammar and the
usage of any data related to you being selected.
Good luck!!!!

 

January 18, 2017

HBCU Bloggers What Does It Take in 2017

wm-jackson
Attending WordPress WordCamp in
Philadelphia #WordCampUS

HBCU Bloggers What Does It Take in 2017
Updated 2017
by Prof. William Jackson
Edward Waters College
Educational Technology and Social Media

Ideas from a Blogger, Influencer, Speaker,
Thought Leader, Presenter and Educator

What does it take to be a blogger and social media
influencer? The ability to create content and share
on Social Media platforms is a process to influence
thinking, decisions and actions of readers. To
develop a personal Brand that exemplifies the
spirit of HBCUs. Students need the exposure and the
opportunity to network with those in the industries
they are interested in. To become serious in their
quest for success and growth.
Exposure is important and networking is vital
to being seen digitally and socially.

blog

Provided by Prof. Jackson
1. Write as if the world is going to view your content
and provide feedback. When people read your blogs
they should understand your passion and the direction
you are going.
2. When blogging take the time to read, review, rewrite,
and revise what you have written. Grammar and spelling
count a great deal.
3. Reflection is important, it is vital to think on your
writings and consider your desired end result, what is
your mission and vision for your content?
4. Embrace the diversity of the world, it expands your
ability to connect and engage with the diversity of your
audience. Your blogs should be able to reach out to
diverse audiences and make a connection.
5. Attend conferences that allow for sharing of ideas
and concepts. No blogger is an island to themselves.
6. When writing remember your building relationships
with others. This is important to establish connectivity
and validity.
7. Read writers that you respect and admire, this
inspires your creativity and literary growth.
8. Storytelling paints a picture, so use words that
encourage the imagination and inspire consistent
content development. Be careful of using cultural
or street language, think about the audience and their
interests.
9. When writing understand that writing is a process,
the more you write the better you get.
10. Don’t be afraid to submit your blogs to newspapers
to be published. You never know who will publish your
works. Even if you are rejected 100 times 101 might be
the one that gets you an awesome gig.
11. Keep your passion and excitement about your writing,
it is an extension of who you are.
12. Write for enjoyment and a purpose.
13. Your writing is an important part of who you are,
what you are growing into and how to expand your voice.
14. HBCU students continue to grow in your field, you may
start off in a tradition blog, be willing to
incorporate Microblogging, Podcasting, Vblogging and
other technologies that reach diverse audiences.
15. Never doubt your ability to grow beyond where you are.
16. Don’t blog when you are emotional, your judgement will
be blurred.
17. Never use your blog to spread racism, profanity,
prejudice, hate, sexism or involve in Sexting. This will
damage your Brand and your reputation.
18. Be careful of who you associate with, this may influence
future internships and scholarships.
19. Never let random people take your picture, they can be
used later against you.
20. Freedom of speech is a constitutional right until you
slander, accuse, threaten and demean others.
21. Be careful and protect your intellectual property, don’t
use company or school based hardware/software to store
blogs, videos or photos.

A blogger is a life-long journey and should be a life
long adventure.

December 30, 2016

Building African Bloggers and Innovators in 2017

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Building African Bloggers and Innovators in 2017
William Jackson, M.Ed.
Twitter @wmjackson – #MyQuestToTeach

“What should we be doing going forward?”
Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
There are millions of potential brother and sister bloggers
in Africa, diverse people of color and culture, yearning to
tell their stories, developing and waiting to share their
Brands and expand their opportunities to collaborate in
education, business,commerce, finance and global
entrepreneurship.
This writing is a contribution of knowledge to share and
hopefully motivate and inspire Africans desiring to Blog,
Microblog,  Videoblog, Podcast and create dynamic content
within their communities. Their (African) voices and stories
are important and should be shared on a global platform of
respect and collaboration on dynamic Social Media platforms.
To represent the African diaspora and historical significance
of the art of storytelling.
What better way than to share with the world, to create unique
content that is just as diverse as the most culturally rich
continent in the world, Africa. I encourage Africans of all ages
to write their stories, to use their creativity to share innovative
ideas and create content that bridges generations and cultures.
The ability to create unique and transformative content that
can connect and unify their continent.

Following the literary talents of Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa
Thiong’o, Wole Soyinka, Ben Okri, Buchi Emecheta, Ama
Ata Aidoo, Dinaw Mengestu, Africans are historic creators
of stories’, poets, and diverse content creators.
African children are learning that through education
they can contribute to the world in ways not available
decades ago.
Colonialism attempted to silence the voices of Africans,
it failed because the voices of Africans can be heard
whispered on the flowing waters and in the air currents,
stories that travel through the trees, and the paths both
dirt and paved across the continent.
Social Media platforms and tools are allowing African
boys and girls to share their stories with the global
community, bringing attention to their lives right from
their mouths and to the ears of billions globally.

kids

As an educator and parent I want to encourage African
children, teens, youth and young adults to share their
stories through the diverse tools that blogging has to
offer and enhance their language abilities, “language
is the way to memory.”
Prof. Wm Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
Do not allow others to tell your stories as was done
during the centuries of slavery, oppression and
colonization.
In the spirit of Chinua Achebe share your stories and
let the world hear you. Chinua Achebe the “Father of
African Literature” has stated many times that the
minds of the people were influenced by the
colonization of Europeans.
That African writers need to be activist in their
writing, to challenge the thinking of Africans, to
encourage intellectualism and activism even still
today.
The thinking and the writing of Africans are
challenging the “emperors” way of thinking,
“because the storyteller has a different agenda”
than the emperor, “Conversation with
Chinua Achebe 2012.”

shutterstock_128237849-620x350

In many ways Africans have a responsibility to
share their stories and share their voices, what
better way to tell truth to life what Europeans have
tried to deny for decades. There was a denial
of building of thought leaders and intellectuals in
Africa during colonial rule. The independence of
Ghana in 1957 and subsequently other African
countries allowed for the potential of building new
intellectuals that in turn will teach others. Sharing
the value of their voices just as Achebe, Soyinka
and others have done, storytelling is a powerful
tool to build cultural pride and dignity.
The 20th and 21st century have opened new ways
for Africans to soar, to embrace the winds of
change that allow for the chains of colonialism to
dissipate. Achebe shares that Africans have the
right to share their expressions. No matter the
medium, the tools, or the platform.
The encouragement of children is important because
as Achebe says that “children can fly,” and should
be encouraged to.
Achebe states that he writes because he likes to
write, I feel the same passion. To share not just
stories, but information to encourage people to think,
contemplate, dream, consider the possibilities to grow
beyond the limited imaginations of those that
do not respect the diversity and the heritage of African
nations or the diaspora.
Africans must tell their stories, share their voices and
build a new dynamic identity for the 21st century.
Africans are more than a people to be colonized and ruled.
They are a people that have passions, expectations, and
dreams, this should be shared with the world.
African voices can influence geopolitical decisions that
will take Africa into the 22nd century and beyond.
Africans as a collective can influence the gaps in education,
in commerce, in the innovation of technology and the
opportunities to achieve more to the benefits of Africa and
African people, not just people from other countries.
54 countries united to solve their own problems can
achieve great things if they unite and speak united. Africa
united as a strong united force to make positive and
transformative change.
These powerful words from stated that, “no foreigners
have ever developed a country, the nationals have developed
their own country.”
Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

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Resources:
Bridging the Diaspora Divide – Teresa H. Clarke at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/sg6F-M6v1iM

South African Bloggers
http://weblogforlove.com/

Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

African on the Blog
http://www.africaontheblog.com

 

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