My Quest To Teach

February 20, 2017

What’s In TEDTALKS, TEDx and TIGERTALKS

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What’s In TEDTALKS, TEDx and TIGERTALKS
William Jackson, parent, educator, blogger
#MyQuestToTeach @wmjackson

Since the inception of the TEDTALKS and the
budding TEDx and even the birthing of TIGER TALKS
with Edward Waters College, there have been dynamic,
inspiring, funny, intellectual and emotional discussions
about every aspect of human life. The sharing of stories
has created an intellectual feeding frenzy of information,
facts, statistics, data, ideas and opinions that are shared.

The TEDxFSCJ held in Jacksonville, Florida is a
wonderful example of the spirit of storytelling and
exchange of information. The continuous process
that has been conducted since human existence of
sharing information through oral communication
or “storytelling.” FSCJ TEDx is an awesome example
of community collaboration and the celebration of
diversity that makes Jacksonville and rising global
contributor.

There is no topic that is taboo (to the best of my
understanding), the exchanges are respectful and
sprinkled with just enough gusto, spunk to sassiness
and classiness to keep those in attendance guessing
what direction the speaker will go in and intrigued
as the dialogue changes with the emotional
attachments to the personal stories being told.

The infusion of culture, gender, lifestyle, religious
and community connections helps in the sharing of
knowledge in a relational way that people connect
and bond.

The speakers open their hearts, their minds and
even their essence of spiritual substance in an
attempt not to change minds, but to build a
relationship that creates a possible change in
behaviors and actions to improve the human
exchanges that sometimes makes us wonder
how we can all be human beings and treat each
other with the disrespect and violence that we
see in news media with wars, discrimination,
racism, and bias. The other side can be seen the
compassion, love, respect, trust and overcoming
of misconceptions that keep people separated.

We question where is our compassion, empathy,
contentedness and respect for cultural understanding,
tolerance and acceptance. This country can be
described as a “salad” of cultural diversity, a “gumbo”
of simmered and spiced flavors of human complexity
and simplicity. TEDx TEDTALKS and TIGER TALKS
allows for communication and encourages open
mindedness.

TEDxFSCJ  can be found at http://www.tedxfscj.com/
and the Team can be found here. http://www.tedxfscj.com/team/

HBCU’s like Edward Waters College are involving their
students in “talks” similar to TEDx expose their students
to  formal speaking opportunities that prepare them for
careers where they will have to speak and prepare
them for opportunities of dialogue and intellectual
sharing and collaboration.

Each semester Professor Jackson an accomplished
speaker, national and international blogger and
instructor at Edward Waters College requires
his students to speak about what they are passionate
about, what they care about and their experiences as
a project in the Educational and Social Media class.
As stated by Professor Jackson, “every Tiger has a story
that needs to be told.” Emma Kent of Library Services
provides her expertise as a master librarian and
researcher in helping to prepare the students for each
discussion. “Team work makes the dream word.”

TIGER TALKS Experience developed by William Jackson,
guides EWC students to improve their writing through
blogging on WordPress platform and encourages students
to attend conferences, even paying for their travel.
HBCU students sometimes lack the professional
experiences so any assistance financial,
advice and mentoring is appreciated.

Exposure and Application allow HBCU students to
build skills to help them to be competitive in a global
economy and builds positive digital footprints when
incorporating technology.
Community invitations are extended to join TEDxFSCJ
and the Tiger Talks Experiences at each school are
shared on their web sites.
Wonderful collaborations by FSCJ and Edward Waters
College have allowed students from EWC and even
DCPS – Duval County Public Schools to participate.
Sharing their experiences and talents in education
and technology.
Resources:
Follow TED on Twitter at http://twitter.com/TEDTalks
or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/TED
Educational Technology at Edward Waters College
http://ewceducationaltechnology.wordpress.com/

 

January 25, 2017

TEDxFSCJ – Vaccinating the Future

Filed under: Education,STEAM,STEAM and STEM,STEM,STEM3,STREAM,TEDxFSCJ — William Jackson @ 9:30 am
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TEDxFSCJ – Vaccinating the Future

Applying STEM – STEAM – STREAM Initiatives
Florida State College at Jacksonville—Deerwood Center

Recent advances in vaccine research have laid the
groundwork for addressing many of the key public
health issues of the 21st century.
Yet vaccines have also proved a source of popular
misunderstanding, and ever-new outbreaks of
infectious disease challenge researchers and
practitioners alike to keep pace with a globally
interconnected health environment. Taken from
FSCJ web site.

Jacksonville is a diversified community with people traveling
from all over the world and its schools one of the most diversified
schools systems in the nation. Addressing the issues of managing
the health and welfare of

TEDxFSCJ will host a salon exploring the critical role vaccines
play in promoting public health.  The evening will include a
panel discussion with Dr. Keith Knutson, a leading cancer
researcher at the Mayo Clinic, and Dr. Pauline Rolle, the Medical
Director of the Florida Department of Health in Duval County.

Co-hosted by FSCJ professors Dr. Dianne Fair and
Dr. Lourdes Norman-McKay, the salon will provide insight
into how a vaccine is brought to market, how vaccines are tested
for safety, the challenges of getting vaccines to the public, and
new hope for using vaccines to fight cancer.  Join the conversation
with cutting-edge researchers and dedicated public health
workers, committed to growing healthy communities.

Panelists

Dr. Pauline J. Rolle, M.D.
Dr. Pauline Rolle is the Medical Director for the
Florida Department of Health in Duval County (DOH-Duval).
She is Board Certified in Pediatrics and Public Health.
A native of Miami, she is a graduate of Fisk University
and Meharry Medical College in Nashville, and she
completed her Pediatric residency training at the University
of Florida Health Science Center in Jacksonville. Before
joining the Department of Health in 2003, she was a
community pediatrician at West Jacksonville Family Health
Center. As Medical Director,  Dr. Rolle oversees the clinical,
dental, pharmacy and behavioral health programs
for DOH-Duval.

Dr. Keith l. Knutson, Ph.D.
Dr. Keith L. Knutson is Professor in the Department
of Immunology at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and
Director, Mayo Clinic Florida Cancer Research Program.
He received his Ph.D. from the University of Georgia in
1995 and completed two post-doctoral fellowships in
immunology, one at the University of British Columbia
and the other at the University of Washington.
Dr. Knutson’s research focuses on the immunology and
immunotherapy of breast and ovarian cancers, and he
is currently a member of the Tumor Microenvironment
Study Section at the Center for Scientific Review at the
National Institutes of Health, a member of the Integration
Panel of Department of Defense’s Ovarian Cancer
Research Program, and a Susan G. Komen Scholar.

Panel hosts

Dr. Dianne Fair, Ph.D.
Dr. Fair is a professor of natural sciences at Florida
State College at Jacksonville. Since 1986, she has taught
biology and chemistry in its various forms from
elementary to middle school, high school to
college. Dr. Fair earned her baccalaureate degrees in
biology and in chemistry from Jacksonville University
and her doctorate in biological sciences/microbiology
from Florida State University. Her primary academic
interests stem from her dissertation on soil microbial
ecology.

Dr. Lourdes Norman-McKay, Ph.D.
Dr. Norman-McKay, a biological sciences professor
at Florida State College at Jacksonville, earned her
doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology from
Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.
During her postdoctoral training, she specialized in
microbiology and immunology, with a primary focus
studying the role of viruses in cancer.
In addition to her 13 years teaching at the collegiate
level, she has experience as an administrator of STEM
programs and is a signed author with Pearson for her
own Microbiology textbook.
Dr. Norman-McKay is especially interested in
enhancing the quality of STEM education and in
promoting the recruitment,
retention, and success of students in these areas.

Photos from the event:

 

December 30, 2016

Building African Bloggers and Innovators in 2017

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Building African Bloggers and Innovators in 2017
William Jackson, M.Ed.
Twitter @wmjackson – #MyQuestToTeach

“What should we be doing going forward?”
Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
There are millions of potential brother and sister bloggers
in Africa, diverse people of color and culture, yearning to
tell their stories, developing and waiting to share their
Brands and expand their opportunities to collaborate in
education, business,commerce, finance and global
entrepreneurship.
This writing is a contribution of knowledge to share and
hopefully motivate and inspire Africans desiring to Blog,
Microblog,  Videoblog, Podcast and create dynamic content
within their communities. Their (African) voices and stories
are important and should be shared on a global platform of
respect and collaboration on dynamic Social Media platforms.
To represent the African diaspora and historical significance
of the art of storytelling.
What better way than to share with the world, to create unique
content that is just as diverse as the most culturally rich
continent in the world, Africa. I encourage Africans of all ages
to write their stories, to use their creativity to share innovative
ideas and create content that bridges generations and cultures.
The ability to create unique and transformative content that
can connect and unify their continent.

Following the literary talents of Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa
Thiong’o, Wole Soyinka, Ben Okri, Buchi Emecheta, Ama
Ata Aidoo, Dinaw Mengestu, Africans are historic creators
of stories’, poets, and diverse content creators.
African children are learning that through education
they can contribute to the world in ways not available
decades ago.
Colonialism attempted to silence the voices of Africans,
it failed because the voices of Africans can be heard
whispered on the flowing waters and in the air currents,
stories that travel through the trees, and the paths both
dirt and paved across the continent.
Social Media platforms and tools are allowing African
boys and girls to share their stories with the global
community, bringing attention to their lives right from
their mouths and to the ears of billions globally.

kids

As an educator and parent I want to encourage African
children, teens, youth and young adults to share their
stories through the diverse tools that blogging has to
offer and enhance their language abilities, “language
is the way to memory.”
Prof. Wm Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
Do not allow others to tell your stories as was done
during the centuries of slavery, oppression and
colonization.
In the spirit of Chinua Achebe share your stories and
let the world hear you. Chinua Achebe the “Father of
African Literature” has stated many times that the
minds of the people were influenced by the
colonization of Europeans.
That African writers need to be activist in their
writing, to challenge the thinking of Africans, to
encourage intellectualism and activism even still
today.
The thinking and the writing of Africans are
challenging the “emperors” way of thinking,
“because the storyteller has a different agenda”
than the emperor, “Conversation with
Chinua Achebe 2012.”

shutterstock_128237849-620x350

In many ways Africans have a responsibility to
share their stories and share their voices, what
better way to tell truth to life what Europeans have
tried to deny for decades. There was a denial
of building of thought leaders and intellectuals in
Africa during colonial rule. The independence of
Ghana in 1957 and subsequently other African
countries allowed for the potential of building new
intellectuals that in turn will teach others. Sharing
the value of their voices just as Achebe, Soyinka
and others have done, storytelling is a powerful
tool to build cultural pride and dignity.
The 20th and 21st century have opened new ways
for Africans to soar, to embrace the winds of
change that allow for the chains of colonialism to
dissipate. Achebe shares that Africans have the
right to share their expressions. No matter the
medium, the tools, or the platform.
The encouragement of children is important because
as Achebe says that “children can fly,” and should
be encouraged to.
Achebe states that he writes because he likes to
write, I feel the same passion. To share not just
stories, but information to encourage people to think,
contemplate, dream, consider the possibilities to grow
beyond the limited imaginations of those that
do not respect the diversity and the heritage of African
nations or the diaspora.
Africans must tell their stories, share their voices and
build a new dynamic identity for the 21st century.
Africans are more than a people to be colonized and ruled.
They are a people that have passions, expectations, and
dreams, this should be shared with the world.
African voices can influence geopolitical decisions that
will take Africa into the 22nd century and beyond.
Africans as a collective can influence the gaps in education,
in commerce, in the innovation of technology and the
opportunities to achieve more to the benefits of Africa and
African people, not just people from other countries.
54 countries united to solve their own problems can
achieve great things if they unite and speak united. Africa
united as a strong united force to make positive and
transformative change.
These powerful words from stated that, “no foreigners
have ever developed a country, the nationals have developed
their own country.”
Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

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Resources:
Bridging the Diaspora Divide – Teresa H. Clarke at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/sg6F-M6v1iM

South African Bloggers
http://weblogforlove.com/

Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

African on the Blog
http://www.africaontheblog.com

 

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