My Quest To Teach

February 26, 2017

A Girls Journey Into Social Media

A Girls Journey Into Social Media
by William Jackson and Breyonna Fox
My Quest to Teach

JIW Group Photo.jpg

Journey Into Womanhood a wonderful collaboration of
young ladies from elementary age to high school held a
workshop  dedicated to teaching about Social Media
safety and responsibility, the prevention of Cyberbullying
and the problems Sexting causes in destroying a girls
reputation and potentially their future career choices.

Elexia Coleman the director and visionary of the program
provides educational,  intellectual, culturally bonding and
community experiences that help girls and young  ladies
grow and blossom in an environment that is encouraging
and engaging.

JIW is an opportunity for girls and young ladies to experience
presentations on multiple levels of activity; professionals like
William Jackson and his intern Breyonna Fox talked to the
ladies on serious subjects that potentially influence decisions
that can have social and career influences.

20170211_101647(0).jpg
Asya and Breyonna Fox

Ms. Fox spoke on her experiences on being bullied and how
Sexting can destroy lives and involve law enforcement.
Ms. Fox shared how girls in high school are under the false
ideas that Sexting is glamorous until their photos are shared
with others that where not intended to see them because of
breaking up with friends and trying to impress a boy or girl.

Boys are involved in Sexting as well and can suffer social and
criminal investigation. There are legal issues that could result
in charges of pornography and child endangerment that may
follow a boy or girl through their life. Ms. Fox shared that  each
girl present  should have personal self-confidence and
self-respect. “The unfortunate reality is that  girls and women
have committed suicide because of Bullying and Sexting.”
Breyonna Fox

william-jackson

William Jackson a teacher in the public school system and a
Professor at Edward Waters College shares with the young
ladies that there is nothing a boy or man can provide that is
more important than personal respect and pride. Through
education a young lady and woman can achieve great things
above and beyond the material things a person like a boy or
girl can give them.

The title of the workshop, “How to be Dope and Responsible
on Social Media,” is available to other organizations that work
with youth, teens and young  adults.  Mr. Jackson speaks at the
international conference Preventing Crime in the Black
Community on preventing bullying, cyberbullying, the power
of incorporating STEM in  education and many aspects of
Social Media.

Volunteers are key to the success of JIW program that will be
celebrating the end of another program year on
Sunday, April 9th  2017 at their annual banquet. JIW is a 501c3
program and accepts donations to provide services to the
participants that will have life-long influence to help the
young ladies grow into future leaders in business, finance,
commerce, education and other careers that fulfill dreams.

The rewarding results of JIW can be seen in the community
involvement of girls and young ladies like Taylor Richardson
#AstronautStarBright, she is working to become an astronaut
and travel to Mars and back,  Taylor and her mom are working
to help girls and women in Jacksonville to see the movie
“Hidden Figures.” They were both invited by the Obama
administration to the White House premiere. Sitting with
current and past NASA astronauts, the actors of Hidden
Figures, First Lady Michelle Obama and other dignitaries.

20170211_101554

Taylor along with other young ladies are doing extraordinary
things in the community and bringing awesome media and news
reports of the great contributions young ladies are providing in
Jacksonville, Florida.

Sponsorship’s and donations are welcomed by JIW to help
continue the works they do in the community that influence
positive directions and accomplishments.

 Resources:
Journey Into Womanhood – http://theconnectory.org/program/journey-into-womanhood-2
JIW Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/empowerment.resources/
The Program
http://www.empowermentresourcesinc.org/what-we-do/journey-into-womanhood-program/

Additional Photos from 2017 -2016 – 2015 Workshops on
STEAM – Cyberbullying – Social Media – Sexting – Education

February 24, 2017

HBCU Bloggers and Content Creators Should Have Authority in 2017

Filed under: Blacks In Technology,CSTEAM,EdCamp,HBCU,hIGHER Eduction,Literacy,Social Media — William Jackson @ 8:30 am

HBCU Bloggers and Content Creators Should Have Authority in 2017
by Prof. William Jackson
Edward Waters College
Twitter: @wmjackson

 

 

 

 

 
Use your Social Media platforms and tools to:
1. Be conversational
The range of online applications are as flexible as the
type of devices that are available. Conversation is the
foundation for networking and building relationships in
online communities. The power is not in the software,
but in the ability to connect and collaborate.
2. Share Content
Sharing content is important to growth in Professional
Learning Communities (PLC) and Professional Learning
Networks (PLN).
The ability to create content, share content and archive
allows for influencing the present and building for the
future.
3. Write / Blog – Content is King
To be a better blogger, you must write as much as possible.
Content creation is king as stated by Bill Gates in many
seminars and conferences. Africans have valuable content to
share. Write to live and live to write is practiced in
academia and business.
4. Build your e-Reputation, e-Personality, e-Reliability
Having a reputation or a personality requires some type
of Social Media presence. The debate is still going on
which one is better, the reality is all are beneficial
to building and marketing a personal, professional and
business Brand. The more content the better depending on
what audience you are trying to reach.
5. Learn to Listen
Teach yourself to listen to people talking about how
they use technology. Learn the difference between
integration, implementation, and initiation of technology.
Join Meetups, EdCamps, Bar Campms and other social events
that connect like-minded people.
6. Take the time to read
Even though YouTube can provide almost all your instructional
needs, reading still cannot be beat.Read about those that
are innovators and smart creatives, learn how to apply
their successful strategies and best practices to your
strategies and build off success.
7. Collaboration – Cooperation – Association
CCA to build your knowledge, build your Brand and learn how
to Market your ideas and skills.
8. Understand your Community
You cannot be friends with everyone on all Social Media.
Learn which sites are beneficial to your needs and help
you network with like minded people that have the similar
goals, mission and vision.
Don’t waste your time on useless Social Media sites that
are not productive or beneficial.
9. Say more with Less
Twitter is 140 characters, how can you communicate in
140 characters or less effectively?
10. Social Media is a “pull system” you must know your
audience. “Pull” them in with valuable content.
Understand who your following, why your following someone.
Know who is following you, and why are they following you.
11. Find your Niche
Finding your Niche is important, your Niche is your voice
and your presence online.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. How do you want people to remember you?
Content rarely goes away,it is
archived, saved, packaged
and stored some place online.
You create a “digital legacy”
with your content.
13. Build a personal mission statement
When using Social Media build a mission statement that can
help you grow academically and professionally.
14. Remember Social Media is about relationships
Building relationships is important. How do you build them
online? Remember everyone does not have the same mission
as you so be careful in your associations.
15. Develop your elevator pitch for those unique times when
you have one opportunity to make an impression in a quick
meeting or a chance elevator visit. Social Media may provide
a one-time shot to pitch your ideas to the “right” person so
have your pitch ready to go.
16. You cannot be shy in the Blogging / Technology Industry
Technology opens opportunities nationally and globally as
never before. Being shy will get you literally nowhere.
17. Don’t view other bloggers as competition, they are
opportunities for collaboration. Sometimes it is better to
collaborate not compete.
18. Brand vs Visual Identity
Learn the difference.
How do people see you online? What is your vision of you and
importantly what are others vision of you?
19. Your Brand is your Promise
Your Brand continues to grow as your knowledge and abilities
grow. Continue to study and learn. Mentor and be a role model
to the youth and teens around you, at your school, community,
place of worship.
20. Your Brand and Niche should be a safe place
Make sure your association is approachable and valuable.
What type of people are you associated with? Do they have a
similar direction, mission and goals as you do?
21. Be Authentic
No one can be you, but you. Don’t try to be something you
are not, don’t steal someone else’s ideas and think about
what you bring to the table.
22. Social Media can bridge Culture
Diversity is a good thing. Diversity is a verb. What kind of
culture are you creating with your culture?
23. Be careful about being assimilated
Assimilation, association and application are important,
but don’t forget who you are and your mission. Keep your
authenticy.
24. You do not have to know everything
Apply what you learn and allow yourself to grow.Be a
life long learner of your craft. Expand your ideas and
even your dreams.
25. Attend conferences and Socials
Connect, socialize and be friends. Never doubt your ability
to be creative and innovative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Build your Brand as having authority over your life.”
Wm Jackson

February 23, 2017

What is STEM and Why African Parents Should Care in 2017

What is STEM and
Why African Parents
Should Care in 2017
William Jackson, M.Ed.
#MyQuestToTeach @wmjackson

When Education Minister, Dr. Mathew Opoku Prempeh
expressed concerns over the low grades
students had in science and math in
Ghana this raised increased awareness for African
parents that their children may not be prepared
for many careers that require science and math
skills. GhanaWeb General News 19/Feb/17

Dr. Prempeh understands how critical these subjects
are for the nation’s development and ability to
compete on a continental level. Citing the West African
Examination Council (WAEC) report the last several
years there is continued failure in the mathematics
and science areas.

There is great change on the continent of Africa,
the incorporation of technology in education and
business and in homes is changing how people
communicate on the African continent. The
engagement of educational initiatives that will
train children for the future creating a transformative
paradigm shift in how education is prepared for
more students as the national infrastructure
is updated.
African children should be preparing for developing
careers in STEAM to solve complex problems that
will challenge the ability to function in a
technology environment.

Better educational opportunities build the
intellectual abilities of youth, teens and young
adults dreaming of being entrepreneurs, building
businesses, involved in commerce and high tech
industries. Training is paramount and vital so
STEAM and STEM initiatives are being provided by
the growth and incorporation of academic courses
being taught in schools.

Parents must know the difference between
STEM/STEAM/STREAM, CSTREAM and STEM2.
These are the infusion of computers, science,
technology, reading, engineering, arts, math
and in some cases medicine.
“The black man in Africa had mastered the arts
and sciences. He knew the course of the stars in
the universe before the man up in Europe
knew that the earth wasn’t flat.” Malcolm X

The mission is to engage the whole child and foster
higher order thinking and critical thinking skills
in all areas,” defined by STE[+a]M. The changing
thinking of building African minds is that STEM
creates core values that embraces diversity in
learning and understanding that all
learning is connected and transferable.

The blending of STEM skills requires students to
engage in creative application, critical and higher
order thinking that supports collaborative and
cooperative learning. Learning that challenges
thinking, bringing about success that is
transferable in advanced areas of application
in society. Many careers are now influenced by
STEM curriculum’s that help determine the paths
for students and their choice of careers.

As an Educational Technology, Social Media and
STEM instructor at Edward Waters College,
educators, artists, business people and scientists
recognize the importance of blending the arts and
sciences believing that this can lead to richer
student learning.

STEAM is complimentary with 21st century artistic,
scientific and technological skills. There is much more
than just teacher centered instruction, the student
must be the center of learning and involve the “4 Cs”:
Creativity, Collaboration, Critical Thinking, and
Communication.

So important are these that foreign nations that come
to Africa to assist are using similar instructional
parameters taught in their nations and transferring
to Africa.
The issue is that African students are playing catch-up
because they are missing critical components. As the
infrastructure is upgraded or built students at a
rapid pace will be the educational, technical, commercial
and commerce leaders it needs to take African nations
into the 21st and 22nd centuries as a leaders and visionaries.

“I believe it is an important developmental tool inasmuch
as it also an issue of social justice that people of this country
no matter their circumstances can have access to good
schooling. It is important that we develop the “human capital”
of our country. The policies that we have will make it possible.”
President Akufo-Addo of Ghana
Matthew Opoku Prempeh is Minister designate for Education
http://citifmonline.com/2017/01/10/matthew-opoku-prempeh-is-minister-designate-for-education/

These sentiments can be shared with many African nations
working to improve educational access from early childhood
to higher education and even vocational education.
It is important for the future of Africa when Africans can
invest and re-invest in their own nations, on their own
continent than waiting on others that do not have the same
passion for the continent and do not have the same wish
for cultural and national stability and pride.

Resources:
About STEM and STEAM
https://myquesttoteach.wordpress.com/steam/
Africa’s Future Depends on STEM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mariame-jamme/africas-workforces-need-r_b_6340556.htm
STEM Education as a Solution to Youth Unemployment
http://www.iafrikan.com/2014/03/12/stem-education-as-a-solution-to-youth-unemployment-in-africa/

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