My Quest To Teach

April 12, 2017

What Do You Do Before High School Graduation 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Do You Do Before
High School Graduation 2017

William Jackson, M.Ed. – Edward Waters College
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

These suggestions are to help as graduation gets closer.
Graduation, an end to an educational journey from Day
Care to High School. Before this momentous occasion
parents need to make sure all the I’s are dotted and
T’s crossed to make a smooth closure to a long journey.
These are just a few suggestions from my experiences as
a parent and a teacher.
Parents make sure your child has enough credits to
graduate and has a “diploma” not a “certificate of
completion”.

Make sure your child understands that their journey
in public education maybe coming to a conclusion,
learning does not end there. It is a continuous
life-long process, ask anyone that is successful,
successful in their career and working in a “real”
career not just a job.

 

 

 

 

1. Make sure you obtain the most recent high
school “official” transcript to send too schools
or potential employers. Many organizations,
schools and groups require a transcript to see
if academically students are “qualified” to be
eligible. The world is highly competitive and
education is the key to achievement and
advancement.

2. Make sure you have current and up to date
medical and dental records. Even after graduating
from high school students are still dependent
on their parents for certain medical services.
Parents must understand “their” graduate is not
an adult yet, they are still maturing, learning
and growing.
There is some information and documentation only
parents can obtain until children are 21 or even
25. As a parent of a 25 and 21 year old, I still
in some cases support my children outside of
money.

3. Make sure there are boundaries and expectations
on behaviors, actions, and even responsibilities
in the home for the soon to be graduates. There
should be mutual understanding on everyone’s duties
and responsibilities and always respect. Stop
telling your child they are “grown” until they are
out of your house and working independently.
Even that is not a guarantee that they will not
need some support until they are established and
able to support themselves.

4. Talk to your child’s teacher(s) about internships,
scholarships, summer employment and community
projects. Do not accept the words, “I got this,”
as being responsible and accountable. Parents end
up paying more in the long run, keep informed and
stay on your child unless they show responsibility.

5. Make hair, nail or beauty appointments months
before May to avoid the rush and chaos of getting
your child ready. Young men need to also reserve
haircuts, shaves, and clothing appointments.

6. Remind your child of the two institutions that want their
attendance Correctional (Prison) and Instructional (Higher
Education) and to make wise decisions even after graduation.
The closer it get to graduation sometimes kids lose touch
with reality and get “stupid” and maybe even “ignant” as
some seasoned seniors would say.

7. Check your child’s academic (Cumulative) folder for items
that may delay graduation or entrance into college, trade
school or the military. You have a right to see their
records and ask questions and if not provided seek an
attorney for help. Don’t wait for the last weeks to make
demands. It makes that person look like a fool because
there are 180 days in the school year, why did you wait.
Check for discipline referrals, changed grades, teacher
notes, etc. All documentation is important.

8. Make sure all deposits and fees are paid in full
before graduation. Check for lost books, needed forms
and other items that should be completed. Do not trust
your child unless they show they are responsible.
“I got this” are the words that put gray hairs
in more parents hairs because something will be
undone that costs money.

9. Know what your child’s GPA is, weighted or un-weighted.

10. Make sure your child takes or has taken the SAT
and the ACT several times.
Many schools only require one, but better safe
than sorry.

11. Check on Bright Futures scholarship information.
Many HBCU’s accept ACT scores that show your child’s
academic success and potential for future success.
Use whichever gives you a better chance of getting
into college and this may affect monies. Check athletic
scholarships, make sure it is a full ride or partial.
Does it cover books and incidentals?

12. Work on your child’s Marketable skills to help
them network and grow. Get them involved in community
events before they need community service hours, not
rushing to beg people to help and the child does not
learn anything from their experiences.

13. Set Academic, Professional, Monetary and Career
goals now so your child will have a flexible plan
of attack when they graduate.

14. Have your child volunteer consistently, stay
involved in your community, and church. Volunteer
hours can still help with networking and build
marketable skills to use later.

15. Search online and inquire with local businesses
about summer internships paid and unpaid. Your time
is valuable so unpaid is important also.

19. Join local business organizations like
Chamber of Commerce to gain marketable skills
and get a jump on career goals.

20. Participate in church events and activities
helps build your resume or CV curriculum vitae.

21. Take college tours, visiting the school
environment to make sure you are familiar with
college or even the military.

22. Social Media entries; post POSITIVE content,
pictures, text and video. Your e-Reputation and
e-Personalities tell a story about you. Social
Media content will define you and may be your
first representation of you to others.

23. Register with LinkedIn to start networking
and connecting. There is a NEW LinkedIn for
students. https://students.linkedin.com/

24. Continue to research educational options
and inquire even now about Masters and
Doctorial programs.

25. Make sure you and your child understand
what type of diploma they will have. It is
painful to expect a High School Diploma and
receive a Certificate of Attendance,
Certificate of Completion, an ESE Diploma or
others.

26. On Social Media unfriend and even block
those that are openly using drugs, weapons
and involved in criminal actions. You may be
“guilty by association” by having them part
of your network.

27. Have a “real” Social Security card, and Birth
Certificate, and if necessary a Visa to travel
abroad. Many high school students and those going
to college are even getting passports.

28. Check with your local police department to make
sure there are no records of mistaken criminal
activity from someone impersonating you or looks
like you.

29. Financial Aid and Scholarship Information can
be found online.
https://twitter.com/prepforcollege
@prepforcollege (Twitter) #CollegeChat,

30. Google and Hashtag yourself to “see” what is
online about yourself to be prepared for questions
of activities and events that your involved in.

31. Contact teachers and other professionals that
you may need letters of recommendations from them.
This is one reason why children need to be
taught to respect and honor adults because it is
the right thing to do and they WILL need their help.

32. Teach your children to be humble, approachable,
honest, responsible and accountable for their
actions. The world is sometimes an unforgiving
place and if mistakes are made sometimes an
apology is accepted, but if one is not given
that can be counted against them.

Parents sometimes it is hard to accept that the
apple does not fall far from the tree. So take
extra care to support your child to build
their confidence, to be proactive and
responsible.

The world has changed, being prepared means
being a well-rounded individual with people
skills, confidence and that understanding that
the world is based on global competition.
Teach your children early about the value of
having an education and being a life-long learner.

If interested in getting into business for girls,
young women and adult women Xplosion 2017
is for  you…

 

March 6, 2017

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself

 

 

 

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself
by Pro. William Jackson
Educational Technology and Social Media
Edward Waters College @wmjackson

HBCU students in the 21st century cannot wait to market themselves
in a world of global commerce, digital Branding, intellectual sharing
and the vast Social Media sites that are building to get the word out
there about the talents, abilities and skills that HBCU students possess.

HBCU students still struggle and have faced more challenges in the past
8 years as HBCU institutions struggle to remain relevant, real and respiratory.
Even with the promises coming by the Trump administration there will
be strings attached, policies to follow, procedures to implement and even
expectations that need to be achieved.  This is not a handout, I hope it is
a help up for these historic institutions and if any money is provided
it is not mismanaged, lost in ill-advised policies nor “misplaced.”

Internal struggles have been a challenge at HBCUs either through faculty
stability, administration interaction with faculty and students or the
changes in generations of priorities. The retention and graduation of
students especially males is a serious issue that needs to be addressed.

The debate about the relevancy of HBCUs continues, data shows that a
high percentage of Black educators that are successful and work in the
most challenging schools graduate from HBCUs and continue on to
earn their advanced degrees. HBCU students are involved in STEM
careers even before STEM and STEAM where aligned with
educational initiatives.

As a graduate of an HBCU South Carolina State University ’85 and an
instructor at Edward Waters College,  the oldest HBCU in Florida, the
struggle is real and in many cases is overcome with each victory of students
graduating and becoming gainfully employed.

Teaching Educational Technology and Social Media the challenge is
teaching students how to compete for jobs before graduation, how to
Brand, then Market to a world of global competition and even tougher
globalization. This blog is about why HBCU students should market
themselves before graduation, usually starting in their junior year to
network with and collaborate with the “right folks.” Instilling in students
that if you want to be an educator, hangout with educators, if you want
to be a lawyer network with attorneys, if you want to even be a gamer
then learn from, compete with and against, and importantly network
with other gamers.

The most dangerous thing that keeps HBCU students from gaining their
dreams and aspirations is being afraid to network, speak with, talk to and
exposed to the diversity that world has to offer. Talking to my students I
share that you will not lose whatever “Blackness” you have if you have a
diversity of friends, associates, networking groups that can empower,
motivate, engage and collaborate with.

These suggestions are designed to help
HBCU students get out of their mental
boxes and to be less introverted and
race conscious
of fear and self-imposed apprehension.

Suggestions to motivate and encourage
for students and educators:

1. Learn how to market yourself before you
search for jobs, before you graduate, either
at the start or before your junior year of
higher education, vocational school or even
the transition from military service to civilian life.
2. Marketing shows your worth, talents, abilities,
work ethic, leadership abilities, being able to
function in diverse environments, acceptance
and tolerance of diversity.
Learn what marketing is….
3. The ability to adapt to the diversity of cultures, technology, responsibility
and accountability for success and failures needs to be learned. That does
not mean babying students it means teaching students how to adapt their
biases, stereotypes that they may have and how to professionally deal with
potential situations and circumstances.
4. HBCU students must always see themselves as investments.
The more you grow and improve the better investment you are to yourself
and future employers.
5. Don’t wait until your senior  year to rush to create a dope or lit resume,
start the first year and build by creating a living document of accomplishments,
volunteerism, learning, leadership, community activism and collaboration.

As a professor in higher education and as a elementary teacher it hurts my
spirit when students state “why do I have to do that”, I don’t wanna be
bothered with those people.” My response is, “do the right people know you
in the career you want or just those that do not want to see you grow beyond
them?”

6. Show yourself as well rounded; the combination of academics, job-training,
extra-curricular activities, volunteerism, all need to show your contribution to
things bigger than you are. Are you a part of something bigger than you?
7. Look at the world globally not just locally. Jacksonville, Florida is the largest
city in the USA by land mass. Students are encouraged in my class to have a
global perspective of the world. The smallest global event in their major can
have major implications on employment and involved in global markets.
8. Believe that your major course of study will have national and
potentially international influence as  you grow and take on more responsibility.
The road to leadership is driven not by money, but by willing to work hard to
make a difference in the world.
9. Learn to be familiar with foreign languages.  Dedicate yourself that you will
learn a new language especially one where you may have to use when traveling.
HBCU students can be heard talking that someday I want to, I might, maybe if.
They want to travel overseas, they do not take the time to plan, execute the plan
or even save to meet the plan. You have to start with a plan!!!
10. HBCU students network with cultural groups and participate in community
events like festivals and networking socials. Never assume that there is already
someone at an event that knows what you know. You have a wealth of inform-
ation that no one else knows.
11. It is important for HBCU students to learn how to integrate Social Media
tools and platforms beyond joking with their friends, booty calls, partying,
clubbing and acting a fool. This multi-functional, diversely dynamic platforms
can allow for communication with employers around the world. These
platforms can help start a career or end a career before it gets started.
12. Being technology savvy is important and just as importantly is how to
apply that knowledge. Use your knowledge to be involved in community
initiatives that build communities, that bring people together and open doors
for collaboration.
13. Have a reliable list of resources to help you grow.
The library services at Edward Waters College has one of the best resources
in its library staff. Emma Kent is a knowledgeable and dedicated professional
that embraces technology. Accentuating the services the library at Edward
Waters College offers. Too many students at HBCUs do not take the time
to get to know their library professionals that have a wealth of information
waiting to share and becoming friends with them. One of the best moves
for me was to be friends with the librarians, custodial staff, be nice to
the cafeteria man and women and secretaries. They became my “extra”
parents with prayers, advice and even extra food on my meal trays!!
14. HBCU students must adapt their thinking as they matriculate through the
years. Their ideas, opinions, skills, networks must change. This change should
be seen in their attire, their speech and self-confidence. Being a lifelong
learner brings benefits that will be seen in the future not just in the present.
15. Applying to both males and females, your visual personality is just as
important as your e-personality and e-reputation. Make the conscious effort
to protect yourself in the direction of your career goals and dreams.
16. During your growth take advantage of tutoring and learning outside of
academics. Attend tutoring for interview skills, cultural understanding, career
counseling, and even role playing directed at your career interests.
The more prepared you are the better prepared you are.
Obtain a mentor, someone that has life experiences, and sees your potential
that you do not. Someone that sees you as an investment to a better
future and learn from them.

February 1, 2017

2017 Reflections for Technological Growth for Parents

 

 

 

 

2017 Reflections for
Technological Growth for Parents
William Jackson, M.Ed. #MyQuestToTeach
@wmjackson

As 2017 continues so does the continued infusion, integration,
and invasion of technical tools, social platforms, interactive
games and devices. People are building machines, robots
and other mechanism that actually do something and the think.
Apps are being developed, it is becoming difficult to decide the
benefits and needs to connect with, chat with, associate with
and involve those that do not have a physical connection in
day to day lives.

People connected by Social Networks may not have the same
value and moral structure as those who have made a physical
connection. Care still needs to be a priority because of the ease
of technical deceptions, distribution of misinformation and deceit.

Terrorist group’s mode for recruitment are online networks that
target youth, teens and young adults to radicalize thinking.
The growth in false news reports is another challenge, social
engagement is important to hash-out truth and lies. 2017 seeks
to be another transformative year of expansion of technological
surprise and wonder but education is the key to being ingaged
and involved.

 

 

 

 

The global access to information
creates stresses that contribute
to psychological, physical and
even emotional changes in many
people. These suggestions are for parents globally that may be
struggling with handling the invasion of technology in the home,
in the community and in schools.

 

 

 

 
1. Parents monitor your child’s online
activities, explain behavior
expectations for actions while online.
a. Parents should be aware of where
their children are going
online and who they are engaging with.
b. Children’s psychological safety is just as important as their
physical safety, so if threatened online children, youth and
teens should notify parents and guardians.
c. Have conversations about favorite sites, online friends,
what social media platforms are being using.
d. Are children using video to share information, are they
using Google maps to tell their friends where they live?
These are questions internationally parents need the answers
too from their children.
2. Parents, “Know safety, No injury. No safety, Know injury”
a. Parents should be involved in determining how much tech
is being used by their children in their homes and in the
community.
b. Parents need to work with schools to help set expectations
and maybe limits in using technology. Social interaction is
still important.
3. Parents help build positive relationships for online activities.
This respect decreases bullying, cyberbullying, cyberstalking
and sexting.
4. Parents must model good online behaviors.
a. If your child sees you acting certain ways they will do the same.
b. Your children are influenced by peer pressure and your role
modeling as a parent.
c. The Internet can be a fun place, but there are dangers.
5. Parents set a time limit for your child being online.
a. More emphasis on reading and other activities that challenge
thinking and encourage social engagement.
b. Reasoning and higher order thinking skills are important skills
to learn by reading and engagement.
c. Internationally youth have great potential to influence the future
of their nation and the world.
6. Parents’ don’t be naïve about the power of Social Media platforms.
a. Sometimes you have to Google and Hashtag to get information.
7. Parents teach your children to know how advertisers work.
a. Not to click ads that say free games, candy, toys, etc.
b. Do not give out addresses and personal information.
8. Parents’ ask your children to teach you something new online.
a. Parents test your child’s intelligence and intellect with technology
by doing online journeys around the world.
9. Parents Google your children, hashtag your children, in Google,
Twitter, Facebook YouTube and other sites.
a. Use their First Name Last Name + City, State, Nation

 

 

 

 

 

10. Parents teach your
children not to put personal
information online.
a. Identity theft is a major problem
in this digital age and terrorists
are working hard to involve youth,
teens and young adults to
be used as weapons and propaganda tools.
11. Parents check parental controls in your browser and learn how to
check your browsers history to see where the kids and teens have
gone online.
12. Parents, if your children play online games monitor the language
and conversations.
13. Each Social Media site has an age restriction, parents talk to
your children about Facebook, SnapChat and others, whatever
your children are involved in.
14. Parents be friends with your kids until they are 16 at least.
a. Don’t stalk them, but monitor behaviors and actions online.
15. Parents the online experience should help to build social skills
and build cultural awareness.
a. Education is influenced, must be guided by parents and
educators working together.
16. “Treat others as you would like to be treated.”
a. The Internet is a global platform, a broad community that
represents the world, there is good and bad.
17. Parents learn new terms so you can understand your child’s
conversations.
a. slang and street language have their places
b. understand “code switching”
18. Parents plan to attend workshops, seminars, and conferences.
a. Build your knowledge, networking and entrepreneurial skills
19. Parents build your home around learning and growth resources.
20. Implement, Integrate, Initiate, technology to your comfort levels.
a. develop a plan of how and where you will use tech at home
for the betterment and empowerment of children.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: