My Quest To Teach

October 6, 2017

Writing and Storytelling for Africans

Africa

Writing and Storytelling for Africans
by William Jackson, M.Ed. @wmjackson Twitter
Speaker at WordCamp DC, WordCamp Jacksonville,
WordCamp Wilmington N.C.

“Writers have to recognize the works of the artist and
those of the activist. Creating content is more than just
throwing words, video, pictures on a digital sheet of
paper. There is serious intellectual thought during the
writing process. Sometimes writing will be in a zone of
creativity and innovation to create new content that has
an intended outcome, but sometimes the outcomes are
unknown.” William Jackson
Professor Soyinka “Just sit down and write….” as he has
stated to the growing African writers across the continent.
The ability of a blogger / writer to write also means that
they have a responsibility to tell the story of those that
cannot write, those that are silent and have no voice.
Digital content is powerful and enabling to bring recog-
nition, attention and urgency to civic issues that need
to be addressed.
The growth of the blogger / writer is composed of periods
of growth, reconciliation, enlightenment and a civic
responsibility to write / blog not just for oneself, but for
those that do not have a voice and will not be heard.
The ability to share a story comes from the ability to listen
and apply knowledge from a person’s experiences,
interactions, goals for growth and even how mistakes are
made and learned from.
The diversity of culture influences a writer’s ability to
“touch” the people they are writing to or writing for.
When past writers applied their skills they shared stories
that could be connected to real life, to the experiences
that many knew they could connect to.
The diversity of African bloggers represents the diversity of
a continent that influences not just the global weather, but
has digital extensions that influence business, commerce,
entrepreneurial spirits of the dreamers, creators and
innovators that have ideas to change the world around them.
Africa is in a constant state of flux economically, educationally,
culturally and the future is unknown, but it is becoming
brighter and brighter a business and entrepreneurial
opportunities become available.
Writers like author and Professor Wole Soyinka who are
involved in civic issues, governmental policies and the
educational growth of youth, teens and adults. He
is of the past, but there are modern writers waiting
to be read.
The African continent has birthed intellectual and
intelligent writers that have embraced and applied
digital platforms to awaken and encourage others in
the African diaspora to spread their digital wings and
write. The storytellers of the past have grown and adapted
to the Bloggers, Vbloggers, Podcasters, Facebook Live
and Instagram Live visionaries building, creating, designing
and posting content that influences thought not just
emotions.
Stated by Soyinka, “when Africans learn the power they
have in their hands in writing, they can influence their
communities and make important and needed changes
because they will have a voice that others can hear and
follow.”
Writing is a grassroots process that builds knowledge in
Africans of all ages and can influence generations. The
educational process is key because as can be seen in Africa
it is dangerous to allow your colonizers to educate your
children. Their goals are not the goals of those being
oppressed. The goal of the oppressor is the keep the
oppressed ignorant. So that their resources can be drained
dry before the oppressed realize what is happening
to their lands, to their people and their very existence.
Stated by Prof. William Jackson of My Quest to Teach
“If we (Blacks) are not speaking for ourselves or writing
for ourselves, someone else is going to describe who we
are, where we came from and ultimately where we are going.”
This creates identity problems because those that are doing
the writing are not looking through the eyes of those being
written about. The people are not seen as people they are
seen as little things with no value, as Chinua Achebe states,
“as funny things.”
Too many stories are wrong in their direction to offer solutions
to issues that Africans are experiencing. Africans must be able
to tell their own stories because there is a story to tell…..
“Your pen has to be on fire.” Chinua Achebe
Resources:
How many people use social media in Africa?
http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/13/africa/africa-social-media-consumption/
BBC Africa
https://www.youtube.com/user/bbcafrica
10 Best African Speakers
https://www.africa.com/ted-global-2017-meet-the-10-africans-on-the-list-of-speakers/

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October 2, 2017

George Maxey of New Town Success Zone Participates in TEDxFSCJ

George Maxey of New Town Success Zone Participates in TEDxFSCJ
by William Jackson, My Quest To Teach
#MyQuestToTeach

George Maxey, Executive Director of New Town Success
Zone,  Lashontah Holiday, Project Coordinator/Data
Analysis Manager and William Jackson, Educator,
Community Activist, Social Media Visionary with
My Quest To Teach attended the TEDxFSCJ with a
discussion focusing on the effects of violence and
incarceration, the lived realities of racism and
gender-based trauma, the economic roots of crime,
and policy innovations within the criminal justice
system.
The seriousness of the growth of youth crime and
violence was the central focus of this panel discussion
centered around the causes of youth, teens and young
adults that enter into the justice system because of
criminal involvement. Additional focus was on
prevention and understanding why this is happening
and the value of improving the educational system
to help youth and teens that have been in the justice
system. The importance of having youth,
teens and  young adults part of the discussion with
the State Attorney Office, law enforcement and even
collaboration with state, local and national governmental
agencies to prevent crime by youth, teens
and young adults.
Titled “Common Stories, Uncommon Futures”
George E. Maxey, the Executive director of the New Town
Success Zone participated in the TEDxFSCJ panel discussion,
also present and participating were:
Melissa W. Nelson, the State Attorney for Florida’s
Fourth Judicial Circuit.
Kimberly Hall, professor of criminal justice at Florida
State College at Jacksonville.
Christina Parrish Stone, Executive Director of the
Springfield Preservation and Revitalization Council, Inc.
Davin Brown, 17-year-old senior at Robert E. Lee High
School and a founding member of the EVAC Movement.
Alyssa Beck, advocacy specialist for the Delores
Barr Weaver Policy Center, with a passion for improving
the lives of young women. New Town Success Zone,
Vision Keepers and community volunteers are working
to bring about change in communities by providing
relevant resources and experts in diverse fields that
are teaching in fields such as medical information,
business ownership, entrepreneurial growth,
building self-confidence and community collaborations.
Workshops are being offered and monthly training
to engage community members and build self-esteem,
community pride and continued participation in
the education system to provide a motivating force
for children.
Communication is very important from using
Social Media platforms like Facebook to word of mouth,
workshops and even food giveaways. Multiple strategies
to feed the mind and body.
More information can be found at:
Vision Keepers
https://www.facebook.com/VisionKeepersofNewTown/
George Maxey
https://www.facebook.com/george.maxey.90
Additional Photos from event provided by 
Wm Jackson 
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/slideshow/TEDxFSCJ%20Youth%20Crime

 

September 18, 2017

Readers Theater performs Stetson Kennedy Legacy “Slave Narratives”

 

Readers Theater performs Stetson Kennedy Legacy “Slave Narratives”

Readers Theater performs at the Ritz Theater
The African Village Celebration 2017
The Stetson Kennedy Legacy “The Slave Narratives and Folklore.”
The cast consists of Ari Turner, Rahman Johnson,Tangela Floyd
(Director), Aida Correa,Jereme Raickett William Jackson
(Social Media and Technology).

Their performances highlight the writings and civil rights works
of Stetson Kennedy, author and historian; his works with other
authors and community activist like Zora Neal Hurston, the “Beach
Lady” MaVynee Betsch of American Beach and others that were pioneers
in literature, civil rights and humanitarian rights.
“Young Minds Building Success Charities, Inc Series has provided
Readers Theater readings for several years in Jacksonville and has
performed nationally and internationally sharing the love of
literacy and literature.

The readings consists of writings by Stetson Kennedy;
Beluthahatchee (place of forgiveness), Folklore: Black Superheroes
(Palmetto Country), and Follow the Drinking Gourd. Each reading
is a dramatization of the history, language, mannerism and life
experiences of those that lived in the historical context of slavery,
civil rights, Jim Crow and even the KKK.

Stetson Kennedy is known for infiltrating the KKK and reporting their
efforts to law enforcement and recording the activities in books.
Celebrating the life of Stetson Kennedy, he is nationally and
internationally known for his diverse literary talents.
For more information contact Tangela Floyd at:
Young Minds Building Success
msakatan3@gmail.com
+19046356167
http://www.ymbsc.org
Stetson Kennedy Official Web Site: http://www.stetsonkennedy.com/
Klandestine Man
https://www.facebook.com/StetsonKennedyMovie/

 

 

 

 

 

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