My Quest To Teach

June 2, 2017

Branding Techniques for HBCU Students

20170309_163633EWC students in Educational Technology must keep a blog active .

Branding Techniques for HBCU Students
by William Jackson
Social Media Visionary for My Quest To Teach
Inspired by “Knockout Branding Techniques”
Bridget N. Armstrong, Black Enterprise 2009

Competition is tough, the fields of study in higher
education need to be mapped out because competition
is not only local it is natioanl and international.
HBCU students continue to face a serious delima in
their approach to relavent and stable career choices.

Educational opportunities have never been more
accessable and equitable, but globally our world
economy has created increased competition.
When I say equitable, todays students have access
to the best resource in history, the World Wide Web
and connected databases, historical literature,
publications from globally and even experts in their
career fields.

Never before in history have students had access to
global learning opportunties that allow for unpresidented
learning and networking. The trick is to get students
to see it, understand it and apply that learning.
Teaching the skills of reading for comprehension is
important even in higher education.

HBCU students during their college careers should
be developing their Brands and their personal Niches.
They, HBCU students need to understand what an
entrepreneur is because the majority of them are and
the value to the process of networking and true
to the meaning of pressing the flesh to be the best
should be taught.

In my Educational Technology, Social Media and STEM
class, too many students even senior did not know what
STEM, STEAM and STREAM where, what PLC – Professional
Learning Communities and PLN – Professional Learning
Networks are and how they work. PLN’s online like
#EduMatch, #FlEdChat, #UrbanEdChat and others where
professionals speak honestly about their careers in
unfiltered ways. Providing best practices, strategies,
knowledge based skills to work smarter.

HBCU juniors and seniors should know the top 5 people
in their course of study, they should know the
educational requirements and where to find advice on
what Social Media platform for jobs, internships and
where is the best place to be hired. There is no time
for being silly or even stupid when you have a tool
that can spread your Brand instantly around the world.

This information is necessary for building a successful
foundation to grow and create professional and
personal stability. To go along with careers, HBCU
students must be unique and original by building a
position for themselves online and offline. Creating
and re-creating to establish their credibility in
E- reputations, E-personalities, E-Branding and what
the Niche will be.

20170309_162931
EWC students must develop strategies to build their Brand and Marketing agenda

Asking these questions about how people see you, do people
see you as an innovator, creator, developer, community
activist. How diverse is your network of associates and
who you can call on for ideas and resources. Can you
“Codeswitch” in diverse environments and feel comfortable
about not losing yourself. Do you know if your an extrovert
or an introvert? Are you a thought leader or are you
cognitively complacent about community issues because you
have your success and everyone else needs to get theirs?

The world if full of diversity and requires situational
awareness. What tools do you have to handle stress,
set-backs, break-downs and even how to manage success?
HBCU students will face many challenges, so their preparation
must be strategic and applied to real life. Finding a mentor
to talk to, share ideas with and to have a person to vent
is important. HBCU students must develop a personal winners
reputation because every Brand is based on the reputation
created. Think about the minds of your audience, potential
customers, clients and even the competition. Your focus
as a student is to create, plan and build a reputation that
sustains your Brand and allows it to grow and open more
opportunties in the future.

Use the summer months to attend conferences, workshops,
find a mentor, visit and participate in library events
and volunteer as much as possible to build your PLN in
your community and city. If you fail to take advantage
of these things you may be missing out on internships,
scholarships and business opportunties that others will
take advantage of and grow from.

You are your own worst enemy and your own best marketing
tool.

 

20170427_162324

The diversity of EWC brings in depth and experiences from exposure, cultural growth
and sharing of ideas. Respect, acceptance, Codeswitching, collaboration, cooperation and
tolerance are key words that should be applied.

May 3, 2017

Redefining of African American Education Through STEAM

Filed under: Education,Literacy,Parenting,Reading,STEAM,STEAM and STEM,STEM,STEM3,STREAM — William Jackson @ 6:15 am

STEAM and STEM

 

Redefining of African American Education Through STEAM
by William Jackson STEAM and STEM Advocate
#MyQuestToTeach
In collaboration with Jax Markerspace panelists:
Shawanna Brooks, Akia Uwanda, Latonja Richardson,
Princess S. Rashid, and Angie Nixon

Education in STEAM requires a holistic approach to teaching children
and families of color and culture the value of STEM and the incorpor-
ation of the Arts. STEM / STEAM panel discussion at the Jacksonville
Public Library – Jax Markerspace held a dynamic panel discussion
of women who are actively engaged in the field of STEAM as entrepr-
eneurs, business leaders, parents and advocates of STEAM through
their personal talents and skills.
Many parents still do not understand the letters and the connection
to their children’s education. Science Technology Engineering Arts
Mathematics, an educational initiative to prepare students for 21st
century careers not just jobs.
The Arts is an important element in promoting STEAM and the
engagement of young people from elementary age or younger to
high school students. “The biggest danger of unemployment today
is not of immigration it is the advancements of technology in robotics,”
Princess S. Rashid which is causing unemployment faster than any
immigrant attempting to cross the borders of this nation to find
employment to support their families.
The distinguished panel including the hostess for Jax Markerspace
at the Downtown Jacksonville Public Library Shawanna Brooks,
musical artist and entrepreneur Akia Uwanda, parent and advocate
for STEM, STEAM and STREAM. Latonja Richardson and her
daughter Taylor who aspires to be an astronaut traveling to Mars.
Princess S. Rashid, Physicist, Artist and Thought Leader, and Angie
Nixon author, literary visionary and entrepreneur of The Adventures
of Moxie Girl with her daughter Natalie and community activist.
Putting STEAM into STEM was a dynamic discussion about the
power of change in education, economics, commerce and even
political power because of the changes that lead to national and
global influences in the changes of careers and thought leadership.
The 20th and 21st century is going through dynamic change because
of the integration of digital technologies. This unique discussion
provided women of diverse walks of life and goals to come together
in solidarity that communities especially African American, Hispanic
and other people of color need to be engaged in involving their
children in hands on learning with higher order and critical thinking.
Paraphrasing Angie Nixon and Latonjay Richardson, the holistic
approach comes to play that children will not change if they continue
to be limited by their environments. If the environment does not
change neither will the desire to change educationally and if there
is no change educationally there may be no change economically.
Princess S. Rashid commented that Black children must learn to
like math and the empowerment it can provide as seen from her
video below.
There is no way around it, math can open doors and provide
access to new careers. Jacksonville Public Library Shawanna
Brooks shared that the resources of the library are free to
everyone and parents need to have their children here to
learn about the global implications of education and business.
The panelists were in agreement that the thinking of students
will not change if parental thinking does not change, thus the
holistic thinking of family and community.  Parents set the tone
and in many cases the direction of educational and career
decisions. In attendance was Mark McCombs, “I teach people
how to build robots and to do what they used to think was
impossible.” Mark McCombs FIRST LEGO League that creates
dynamic opportunities for team building, engineering, building
and coding of robotics that are involved in competitions.
This is another key area of STEM and STEAM student can be
involved in, but must get their schools engaged.
Children are conditioned by their environment, if they do not
see change or the conditions for change their thinking will
remain the same, their desire to change their lives will not be
inspired.
The panel discussion brought a new direction to potentially
changing how children should be taught. Being active, engaged,
and hands on brings faster growth than traditional lecture
instruction. Children in schools today are not like the children
of the 40’s through 80’s, they are more active and require
increased visual, auditory and active stimulation. Because
of this change education needs to be modified as well. When
listening to the discussions there is a urgency and a sense
of priority in the realization of the influence of technology and
it’s generational influences.
These ladies of influence, knowledge, social conscious, civic
duty and even a moral directional conscious want every child
to be successful because it “takes a village,” as Latonya
Richardson shares to the audience, to raise the leaders,
workers, innovators and creators of the present and the future.
Putting STEAM into STEM provides an opportunity to share the
potential to move children from being consumers of technology
to creators, innovators, visionaries and models for future
generations.

 

20170412_175452.jpg
#STEAM into #STEM 2017
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/
STEAM%20into%20STEM%202017/story

A discussion about the integration
STEAM into the #Arts – Photos via @wmjackson @jaxlibrary

Facebook Resources:
JaxMakerSpace
https://www.facebook.com/jaxmakerspace/
Shawana Brooks
https://www.facebook.com/shawana.brooks
Erin Estreet Kendric
https://www.facebook.com/ErinEstreetKendrick
Akia Uwanda
https://www.facebook.com/akia.uwanda
Angie Nixon
https://www.facebook.com/angienixon
Latonja Richardson
https://www.facebook.com/latonja.richardson
Princess S. Rashid
https://www.facebook.com/prashid
Mark D McCombs
https://www.facebook.com/markdmccombs
FIRST LEGO LEAGUE
https://www.facebook.com/pg/FLFIRSTLEGOLeague/
William Jackson
https://www.facebook.com/williamdjacksoninfl
and contributions by the distinguished panel.

Videos
What is STEM by Shawanna Brooks
https://youtu.be/fTkzCChDeMU
The Importance of Math in STEM and STEAM
https://youtu.be/Kwv8Geb47_Q
Tony Richardson Being a STEM Parent
https://youtu.be/lsR3eV5-Pck
20170412_163339

April 8, 2017

Black Girl Magic As An Agent of STEM

STEM  Panelists
Hortinse Diggs – Grace Johnson – Mary Madison – Lesley Harris

“Science is not a boy’s game, it’s not a girl’s game.
It’s everyone’s game. It’s about where we are and
where we’re going.
Space travel benefits us here on Earth. And we
ain’t stopped yet. There’s more exploration to come.”
Nichelle Nichols, former NASA Ambassador and actress

“When I was young I was very interested in science
and technology, and my dad brought home the first
computer. I played pac man and I was hooked!
By learning to create technology, girls learn to
speak up.”
Regina Agyare, Founder of software company
Soronko Solutions

“Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street
with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she
is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom
of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely
cause is the elephant on her chest.
For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of
women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the
elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and
lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask
the question.”
Sally Ride
First American Woman in Space
Challenger Space Shuttle, 1983

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VIDEOS

Encouraging Words from Women of STEM

Encouraging our students in STEM

A Good Work Ethic Is Important

Have a Passion for Math

Build Friendships with Others

Mentoring and Allow God to Work

Put In That Vision for College Early

You have to believe in yourself always

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PHOTOS

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