My Quest To Teach

February 23, 2017

What is STEM and Why African Parents Should Care in 2017

What is STEM and
Why African Parents
Should Care in 2017
William Jackson, M.Ed.
#MyQuestToTeach @wmjackson

When Education Minister, Dr. Mathew Opoku Prempeh
expressed concerns over the low grades
students had in science and math in
Ghana this raised increased awareness for African
parents that their children may not be prepared
for many careers that require science and math
skills. GhanaWeb General News 19/Feb/17

Dr. Prempeh understands how critical these subjects
are for the nation’s development and ability to
compete on a continental level. Citing the West African
Examination Council (WAEC) report the last several
years there is continued failure in the mathematics
and science areas.

There is great change on the continent of Africa,
the incorporation of technology in education and
business and in homes is changing how people
communicate on the African continent. The
engagement of educational initiatives that will
train children for the future creating a transformative
paradigm shift in how education is prepared for
more students as the national infrastructure
is updated.
African children should be preparing for developing
careers in STEAM to solve complex problems that
will challenge the ability to function in a
technology environment.

Better educational opportunities build the
intellectual abilities of youth, teens and young
adults dreaming of being entrepreneurs, building
businesses, involved in commerce and high tech
industries. Training is paramount and vital so
STEAM and STEM initiatives are being provided by
the growth and incorporation of academic courses
being taught in schools.

Parents must know the difference between
STEM/STEAM/STREAM, CSTREAM and STEM2.
These are the infusion of computers, science,
technology, reading, engineering, arts, math
and in some cases medicine.
“The black man in Africa had mastered the arts
and sciences. He knew the course of the stars in
the universe before the man up in Europe
knew that the earth wasn’t flat.” Malcolm X

The mission is to engage the whole child and foster
higher order thinking and critical thinking skills
in all areas,” defined by STE[+a]M. The changing
thinking of building African minds is that STEM
creates core values that embraces diversity in
learning and understanding that all
learning is connected and transferable.

The blending of STEM skills requires students to
engage in creative application, critical and higher
order thinking that supports collaborative and
cooperative learning. Learning that challenges
thinking, bringing about success that is
transferable in advanced areas of application
in society. Many careers are now influenced by
STEM curriculum’s that help determine the paths
for students and their choice of careers.

As an Educational Technology, Social Media and
STEM instructor at Edward Waters College,
educators, artists, business people and scientists
recognize the importance of blending the arts and
sciences believing that this can lead to richer
student learning.

STEAM is complimentary with 21st century artistic,
scientific and technological skills. There is much more
than just teacher centered instruction, the student
must be the center of learning and involve the “4 Cs”:
Creativity, Collaboration, Critical Thinking, and
Communication.

So important are these that foreign nations that come
to Africa to assist are using similar instructional
parameters taught in their nations and transferring
to Africa.
The issue is that African students are playing catch-up
because they are missing critical components. As the
infrastructure is upgraded or built students at a
rapid pace will be the educational, technical, commercial
and commerce leaders it needs to take African nations
into the 21st and 22nd centuries as a leaders and visionaries.

“I believe it is an important developmental tool inasmuch
as it also an issue of social justice that people of this country
no matter their circumstances can have access to good
schooling. It is important that we develop the “human capital”
of our country. The policies that we have will make it possible.”
President Akufo-Addo of Ghana
Matthew Opoku Prempeh is Minister designate for Education
http://citifmonline.com/2017/01/10/matthew-opoku-prempeh-is-minister-designate-for-education/

These sentiments can be shared with many African nations
working to improve educational access from early childhood
to higher education and even vocational education.
It is important for the future of Africa when Africans can
invest and re-invest in their own nations, on their own
continent than waiting on others that do not have the same
passion for the continent and do not have the same wish
for cultural and national stability and pride.

Resources:
About STEM and STEAM
https://myquesttoteach.wordpress.com/steam/
Africa’s Future Depends on STEM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mariame-jamme/africas-workforces-need-r_b_6340556.htm
STEM Education as a Solution to Youth Unemployment
http://www.iafrikan.com/2014/03/12/stem-education-as-a-solution-to-youth-unemployment-in-africa/

February 1, 2017

2017 Reflections for Technological Growth for Parents

 

 

 

 

2017 Reflections for
Technological Growth for Parents
William Jackson, M.Ed. #MyQuestToTeach
@wmjackson

As 2017 continues so does the continued infusion, integration,
and invasion of technical tools, social platforms, interactive
games and devices. People are building machines, robots
and other mechanism that actually do something and the think.
Apps are being developed, it is becoming difficult to decide the
benefits and needs to connect with, chat with, associate with
and involve those that do not have a physical connection in
day to day lives.

People connected by Social Networks may not have the same
value and moral structure as those who have made a physical
connection. Care still needs to be a priority because of the ease
of technical deceptions, distribution of misinformation and deceit.

Terrorist group’s mode for recruitment are online networks that
target youth, teens and young adults to radicalize thinking.
The growth in false news reports is another challenge, social
engagement is important to hash-out truth and lies. 2017 seeks
to be another transformative year of expansion of technological
surprise and wonder but education is the key to being ingaged
and involved.

 

 

 

 

The global access to information
creates stresses that contribute
to psychological, physical and
even emotional changes in many
people. These suggestions are for parents globally that may be
struggling with handling the invasion of technology in the home,
in the community and in schools.

 

 

 

 
1. Parents monitor your child’s online
activities, explain behavior
expectations for actions while online.
a. Parents should be aware of where
their children are going
online and who they are engaging with.
b. Children’s psychological safety is just as important as their
physical safety, so if threatened online children, youth and
teens should notify parents and guardians.
c. Have conversations about favorite sites, online friends,
what social media platforms are being using.
d. Are children using video to share information, are they
using Google maps to tell their friends where they live?
These are questions internationally parents need the answers
too from their children.
2. Parents, “Know safety, No injury. No safety, Know injury”
a. Parents should be involved in determining how much tech
is being used by their children in their homes and in the
community.
b. Parents need to work with schools to help set expectations
and maybe limits in using technology. Social interaction is
still important.
3. Parents help build positive relationships for online activities.
This respect decreases bullying, cyberbullying, cyberstalking
and sexting.
4. Parents must model good online behaviors.
a. If your child sees you acting certain ways they will do the same.
b. Your children are influenced by peer pressure and your role
modeling as a parent.
c. The Internet can be a fun place, but there are dangers.
5. Parents set a time limit for your child being online.
a. More emphasis on reading and other activities that challenge
thinking and encourage social engagement.
b. Reasoning and higher order thinking skills are important skills
to learn by reading and engagement.
c. Internationally youth have great potential to influence the future
of their nation and the world.
6. Parents’ don’t be naïve about the power of Social Media platforms.
a. Sometimes you have to Google and Hashtag to get information.
7. Parents teach your children to know how advertisers work.
a. Not to click ads that say free games, candy, toys, etc.
b. Do not give out addresses and personal information.
8. Parents’ ask your children to teach you something new online.
a. Parents test your child’s intelligence and intellect with technology
by doing online journeys around the world.
9. Parents Google your children, hashtag your children, in Google,
Twitter, Facebook YouTube and other sites.
a. Use their First Name Last Name + City, State, Nation

 

 

 

 

 

10. Parents teach your
children not to put personal
information online.
a. Identity theft is a major problem
in this digital age and terrorists
are working hard to involve youth,
teens and young adults to
be used as weapons and propaganda tools.
11. Parents check parental controls in your browser and learn how to
check your browsers history to see where the kids and teens have
gone online.
12. Parents, if your children play online games monitor the language
and conversations.
13. Each Social Media site has an age restriction, parents talk to
your children about Facebook, SnapChat and others, whatever
your children are involved in.
14. Parents be friends with your kids until they are 16 at least.
a. Don’t stalk them, but monitor behaviors and actions online.
15. Parents the online experience should help to build social skills
and build cultural awareness.
a. Education is influenced, must be guided by parents and
educators working together.
16. “Treat others as you would like to be treated.”
a. The Internet is a global platform, a broad community that
represents the world, there is good and bad.
17. Parents learn new terms so you can understand your child’s
conversations.
a. slang and street language have their places
b. understand “code switching”
18. Parents plan to attend workshops, seminars, and conferences.
a. Build your knowledge, networking and entrepreneurial skills
19. Parents build your home around learning and growth resources.
20. Implement, Integrate, Initiate, technology to your comfort levels.
a. develop a plan of how and where you will use tech at home
for the betterment and empowerment of children.

January 25, 2017

TEDxFSCJ – Vaccinating the Future

Filed under: Education,STEAM,STEAM and STEM,STEM,STEM3,STREAM,TEDxFSCJ — William Jackson @ 9:30 am
Tags: , , ,

234

TEDxFSCJ – Vaccinating the Future

Applying STEM – STEAM – STREAM Initiatives
Florida State College at Jacksonville—Deerwood Center

Recent advances in vaccine research have laid the
groundwork for addressing many of the key public
health issues of the 21st century.
Yet vaccines have also proved a source of popular
misunderstanding, and ever-new outbreaks of
infectious disease challenge researchers and
practitioners alike to keep pace with a globally
interconnected health environment. Taken from
FSCJ web site.

Jacksonville is a diversified community with people traveling
from all over the world and its schools one of the most diversified
schools systems in the nation. Addressing the issues of managing
the health and welfare of

TEDxFSCJ will host a salon exploring the critical role vaccines
play in promoting public health.  The evening will include a
panel discussion with Dr. Keith Knutson, a leading cancer
researcher at the Mayo Clinic, and Dr. Pauline Rolle, the Medical
Director of the Florida Department of Health in Duval County.

Co-hosted by FSCJ professors Dr. Dianne Fair and
Dr. Lourdes Norman-McKay, the salon will provide insight
into how a vaccine is brought to market, how vaccines are tested
for safety, the challenges of getting vaccines to the public, and
new hope for using vaccines to fight cancer.  Join the conversation
with cutting-edge researchers and dedicated public health
workers, committed to growing healthy communities.

Panelists

Dr. Pauline J. Rolle, M.D.
Dr. Pauline Rolle is the Medical Director for the
Florida Department of Health in Duval County (DOH-Duval).
She is Board Certified in Pediatrics and Public Health.
A native of Miami, she is a graduate of Fisk University
and Meharry Medical College in Nashville, and she
completed her Pediatric residency training at the University
of Florida Health Science Center in Jacksonville. Before
joining the Department of Health in 2003, she was a
community pediatrician at West Jacksonville Family Health
Center. As Medical Director,  Dr. Rolle oversees the clinical,
dental, pharmacy and behavioral health programs
for DOH-Duval.

Dr. Keith l. Knutson, Ph.D.
Dr. Keith L. Knutson is Professor in the Department
of Immunology at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and
Director, Mayo Clinic Florida Cancer Research Program.
He received his Ph.D. from the University of Georgia in
1995 and completed two post-doctoral fellowships in
immunology, one at the University of British Columbia
and the other at the University of Washington.
Dr. Knutson’s research focuses on the immunology and
immunotherapy of breast and ovarian cancers, and he
is currently a member of the Tumor Microenvironment
Study Section at the Center for Scientific Review at the
National Institutes of Health, a member of the Integration
Panel of Department of Defense’s Ovarian Cancer
Research Program, and a Susan G. Komen Scholar.

Panel hosts

Dr. Dianne Fair, Ph.D.
Dr. Fair is a professor of natural sciences at Florida
State College at Jacksonville. Since 1986, she has taught
biology and chemistry in its various forms from
elementary to middle school, high school to
college. Dr. Fair earned her baccalaureate degrees in
biology and in chemistry from Jacksonville University
and her doctorate in biological sciences/microbiology
from Florida State University. Her primary academic
interests stem from her dissertation on soil microbial
ecology.

Dr. Lourdes Norman-McKay, Ph.D.
Dr. Norman-McKay, a biological sciences professor
at Florida State College at Jacksonville, earned her
doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology from
Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.
During her postdoctoral training, she specialized in
microbiology and immunology, with a primary focus
studying the role of viruses in cancer.
In addition to her 13 years teaching at the collegiate
level, she has experience as an administrator of STEM
programs and is a signed author with Pearson for her
own Microbiology textbook.
Dr. Norman-McKay is especially interested in
enhancing the quality of STEM education and in
promoting the recruitment,
retention, and success of students in these areas.

Photos from the event:

 

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