My Quest To Teach

March 6, 2017

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself

 

 

 

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself
by Pro. William Jackson
Educational Technology and Social Media
Edward Waters College @wmjackson

HBCU students in the 21st century cannot wait to market themselves
in a world of global commerce, digital Branding, intellectual sharing
and the vast Social Media sites that are building to get the word out
there about the talents, abilities and skills that HBCU students possess.

HBCU students still struggle and have faced more challenges in the past
8 years as HBCU institutions struggle to remain relevant, real and respiratory.
Even with the promises coming by the Trump administration there will
be strings attached, policies to follow, procedures to implement and even
expectations that need to be achieved.  This is not a handout, I hope it is
a help up for these historic institutions and if any money is provided
it is not mismanaged, lost in ill-advised policies nor “misplaced.”

Internal struggles have been a challenge at HBCUs either through faculty
stability, administration interaction with faculty and students or the
changes in generations of priorities. The retention and graduation of
students especially males is a serious issue that needs to be addressed.

The debate about the relevancy of HBCUs continues, data shows that a
high percentage of Black educators that are successful and work in the
most challenging schools graduate from HBCUs and continue on to
earn their advanced degrees. HBCU students are involved in STEM
careers even before STEM and STEAM where aligned with
educational initiatives.

As a graduate of an HBCU South Carolina State University ’85 and an
instructor at Edward Waters College,  the oldest HBCU in Florida, the
struggle is real and in many cases is overcome with each victory of students
graduating and becoming gainfully employed.

Teaching Educational Technology and Social Media the challenge is
teaching students how to compete for jobs before graduation, how to
Brand, then Market to a world of global competition and even tougher
globalization. This blog is about why HBCU students should market
themselves before graduation, usually starting in their junior year to
network with and collaborate with the “right folks.” Instilling in students
that if you want to be an educator, hangout with educators, if you want
to be a lawyer network with attorneys, if you want to even be a gamer
then learn from, compete with and against, and importantly network
with other gamers.

The most dangerous thing that keeps HBCU students from gaining their
dreams and aspirations is being afraid to network, speak with, talk to and
exposed to the diversity that world has to offer. Talking to my students I
share that you will not lose whatever “Blackness” you have if you have a
diversity of friends, associates, networking groups that can empower,
motivate, engage and collaborate with.

These suggestions are designed to help
HBCU students get out of their mental
boxes and to be less introverted and
race conscious
of fear and self-imposed apprehension.

Suggestions to motivate and encourage
for students and educators:

1. Learn how to market yourself before you
search for jobs, before you graduate, either
at the start or before your junior year of
higher education, vocational school or even
the transition from military service to civilian life.
2. Marketing shows your worth, talents, abilities,
work ethic, leadership abilities, being able to
function in diverse environments, acceptance
and tolerance of diversity.
Learn what marketing is….
3. The ability to adapt to the diversity of cultures, technology, responsibility
and accountability for success and failures needs to be learned. That does
not mean babying students it means teaching students how to adapt their
biases, stereotypes that they may have and how to professionally deal with
potential situations and circumstances.
4. HBCU students must always see themselves as investments.
The more you grow and improve the better investment you are to yourself
and future employers.
5. Don’t wait until your senior  year to rush to create a dope or lit resume,
start the first year and build by creating a living document of accomplishments,
volunteerism, learning, leadership, community activism and collaboration.

As a professor in higher education and as a elementary teacher it hurts my
spirit when students state “why do I have to do that”, I don’t wanna be
bothered with those people.” My response is, “do the right people know you
in the career you want or just those that do not want to see you grow beyond
them?”

6. Show yourself as well rounded; the combination of academics, job-training,
extra-curricular activities, volunteerism, all need to show your contribution to
things bigger than you are. Are you a part of something bigger than you?
7. Look at the world globally not just locally. Jacksonville, Florida is the largest
city in the USA by land mass. Students are encouraged in my class to have a
global perspective of the world. The smallest global event in their major can
have major implications on employment and involved in global markets.
8. Believe that your major course of study will have national and
potentially international influence as  you grow and take on more responsibility.
The road to leadership is driven not by money, but by willing to work hard to
make a difference in the world.
9. Learn to be familiar with foreign languages.  Dedicate yourself that you will
learn a new language especially one where you may have to use when traveling.
HBCU students can be heard talking that someday I want to, I might, maybe if.
They want to travel overseas, they do not take the time to plan, execute the plan
or even save to meet the plan. You have to start with a plan!!!
10. HBCU students network with cultural groups and participate in community
events like festivals and networking socials. Never assume that there is already
someone at an event that knows what you know. You have a wealth of inform-
ation that no one else knows.
11. It is important for HBCU students to learn how to integrate Social Media
tools and platforms beyond joking with their friends, booty calls, partying,
clubbing and acting a fool. This multi-functional, diversely dynamic platforms
can allow for communication with employers around the world. These
platforms can help start a career or end a career before it gets started.
12. Being technology savvy is important and just as importantly is how to
apply that knowledge. Use your knowledge to be involved in community
initiatives that build communities, that bring people together and open doors
for collaboration.
13. Have a reliable list of resources to help you grow.
The library services at Edward Waters College has one of the best resources
in its library staff. Emma Kent is a knowledgeable and dedicated professional
that embraces technology. Accentuating the services the library at Edward
Waters College offers. Too many students at HBCUs do not take the time
to get to know their library professionals that have a wealth of information
waiting to share and becoming friends with them. One of the best moves
for me was to be friends with the librarians, custodial staff, be nice to
the cafeteria man and women and secretaries. They became my “extra”
parents with prayers, advice and even extra food on my meal trays!!
14. HBCU students must adapt their thinking as they matriculate through the
years. Their ideas, opinions, skills, networks must change. This change should
be seen in their attire, their speech and self-confidence. Being a lifelong
learner brings benefits that will be seen in the future not just in the present.
15. Applying to both males and females, your visual personality is just as
important as your e-personality and e-reputation. Make the conscious effort
to protect yourself in the direction of your career goals and dreams.
16. During your growth take advantage of tutoring and learning outside of
academics. Attend tutoring for interview skills, cultural understanding, career
counseling, and even role playing directed at your career interests.
The more prepared you are the better prepared you are.
Obtain a mentor, someone that has life experiences, and sees your potential
that you do not. Someone that sees you as an investment to a better
future and learn from them.

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December 14, 2016

What TIGER TALKS Experience Tries to Teach Students of HBCU’s

20161208_192025
Emma Kent, Library Services
Prof. Wm Jackson, Educational Technology and
Social Media

What TIGER TALKS Experience Tries to Teach Students of HBCU’s
The motto, “every tiger has a story that needs to be told,”
is shared by Professor William Jackson, instructor and
Emma Kent of Library Services at Edward Waters College.
The Tiger Talks Experience is designed to encourage EWC
students to speak at an informal venue about their passions
as students, share their dreams of future success in their career
choices, speak on life experiences that can help others overcome
challenges and what their talents, skills and abilities are.

The importance of diversity and engagement to prepare for their
future professions and travels.  Modeled after the TEDTALKS and
TEDx that have been ongoing for several years, the TIGER TALKS
Experience is a platform for HBCU students –
Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Started in Professor Jackson’s Educational Technology and
Social Media class in the Education and Urban Studies Department.
Professor Jackson wanted a way to expose EWC students to the
dynamic discussions taking place on TEDx and TEDTALKS. The
result is TIGER TALKS Experiences.
There is the hope that this will expand through a collaboration with
other Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) across
the country and it grows into a national model to teach presentation
skills, the importance of articulation when speaking, research and
writing, blogging, content creation, how to establish a Brand and
even increase the opportunities for HBCU students to network for
jobs, internships and starting careers.

20161208_191935
Participants in the first Tiger Talks Experience
Mr. D. Smith Mr. P. Braynen, Mr. W. Heckstall
Mr. J. Gregory  and Prof. Jackson

Blogging is important in the Educational Technology course, students
are required to establish a blog on #WordPress and connect their
Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. This is not for entertainment, but to
teach how influential Social Media and content creation are, to build
a positive dynamic digital presence and manage it like a professional.

The skills of writing, presentation and articulation are what is lacking
in graduating students across the nation as industry leaders claim.
Writing is vital as a major communication tool in the majority
of business, medicine, commerce and educational careers.
Inside Higher Education
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/01/20/
study-finds-big-gaps-between-student-and-employer-perceptions

In to many cases students do not have the opportunity to learn how
to speak to large groups, how to present a PowerPoint in a formal
setting and understand the need to be published as they build their
Brands.

20161208_193628
Mr. Heckstall aspiring pilot

HBCU institutions must be diligent in making sure that their students
are able to compete in global markets that may take them to foreign
nations where the opportunities may become professionally and
financially stable. HBCU institutions must make sure their students
are proficient in writing, presentation skills, blogging online is an
option to teach writing, critical thinking and higher order thinking
skills. Students of color and culture needs to be prepared because
competition for jobs is fierce.

20161208_194524
Mr. D. Smith

NPR Reporting
http://www.npr.org/2011/02/09/133310978/
in-college-a-lack-of-rigor-leaves-students-adrift

This semester’s event has several students and a host of interested
students and faculty in attendance who look forward to speaking
in the spring semester. The students were congratulated by provided
door prizes and educational resources directed to scholarships and
internships.

20161103_181129
Jon Gregory, WordCamp veteran, EdCamp NASBE
and speaker at TEDxFSCJ Salon

More information can be found by contacting
Prof. William Jackson
william.jackson@ewc.edu @wmjackson Twitter
Emma Kent, Library Services
emma.kent@ewc.edu  Twitter @librariantiger
Edward Waters College
The oldest HBCU in the state of
Florida http://www.ewc.edu/ Twitter @ewctigers

May 4, 2016

Bar Camp and Sharing Dynamic Information

Bar Camp and Sharing Dynamic Information
@wmjackson #BarCamp #OrlandoTech
#MyQuestToTeach

Wm Jackson

William Jackson, Teacher of the Year for 2015 – 2016
at Venetia Elementary School in Duval County Public Schools
and Adjunct Professor with Edward Waters College, teaching
Educational Technology / Social Media and STEAM in the
Education and Urban Studies Department speaks at
“Bar Camp” technology camp associated with Orlando
Technology Week in Orlando, Florida and attends the first
WordCamp of Jacksonville, Florida.

Attending technology camps, conferences and seminars
provides dynamic networking opportunities to learn from
diverse people with multiple skills and talents.  The expansion
of technology requires life-long learning and participation
in professional development opportunities. Teaching is always
a great way to evaluate personal knowledge and abilities.
Those in technology understand that being able to speak
about technology and share knowledge is invaluable to growth.

Mr. Jackson is a teacher, blogger, content creator and speaker
on the importance of creating positive online content for youth,
teens and young adults.  The use of Social Media platforms
and tools to build positive online “SWAG” for educational and
professional success of teens and young adults. Professor
Jackson speaks on Social Media Etiquette in his program
“Social Media SWAG” that encourages positive and productive
content online and teaches youth, teens and young adults that
their Smartphones, watches, tablets and other digital mobile
devices can be their best friend or worse enemy.

William Jackson

Using the example of the recent National Football League Draft
that students even in high school and middle school can cause
problems later in life with inappropriate digital content.
Their content can influence entering into higher education,
military service, employment and even the National Football
League Draft, other professional sports teams also view Social
Media platforms of potential and current athletes to evaluate
their ethical and moral behaviors.

Laremy Tunsil, has provided a valuable lesson to middle and
high school students about their Social Media content and
activities. Caution should be used when doing anything and
posting it online for the world to see. Taken from media reports
“The NFL Draft’s first round offered a longer wait than expected
for Tunsil, who was considered the top offensive lineman in the
entire class. A social media post drew controversy on the day of
the draft, which reportedly caused him to slide.” This cost him
thousands if not millions of dollars.

Mr. Jackson a regular speaker at the international conference;
“Preventing Crime In The Black Community” produced by
Florida State Attorney’s Office, May 25, 26, 27, 2016 in Miami,
Florida provides an engaging and interactive discussion on
preventing cyberbullying, the dangers of Sexting and cyberstalking
to teens in high school and college.

William Jackson, Blogger and Speaker

William Jackson, Blogger and Speaker

The presentations are an interactive dialogue that encourages feedback
and experiences by youth, teens and young adults attending, the
key statement is his tag line to allow youth, teens and young adults
to apply his wisdom as an educator, business owner, parent and
community activist.
“Your digital mobile devices can be your best friend or worst enemy
depending on how you apply those tools and platforms.” Wm Jackson

Wm Jackson, M.Ed.
William.jackson@ewc.edu
Blogging at:
My Quest To Teach – http://MyQuestToTeach.Wordpress.com/

National and International Blogger and Content Creator
Twitter: @WmJackson
Instagram: http://instagram.com/williamdjackson

FlBlogConEdu

 

April 28, 2016

What I Learned from Bar Camp at #OrlandoTech Week

What I Learned from Bar Camp at #OrlandoTech Week
William Jackson, M.Ed.
Teacher of the Year 2015 – 2016
Venetia Elementary School
Duval County Public Schools

20160423_092230

Participating in my first #OrlandoTech Week was
a fun, exciting, awesome and overwhelming experience,
even though I have been involved in technology for
quite a few years there is always an excitement
meeting people with diverse skills related to
technology that are not in the education field.
The beauty is that what I learn I can share with
my students in Duval County Public Schools and
with my students in my Educational Technology
and Social Media class at Edward Waters College.

Being engaged with industry leaders, creators, developers
and programmers allowed me to learn that there are
many diverse areas in the expanding fields of technology
and tech integration.
The faces of the people in fields of web development,
programming, coding and other fields have changed
from representing a single culture to one of
beautiful and dynamic cultural diversity and gender
inclusion.

Although more needs to be done, this will only
happen when boys and girls of color, culture and
diversity continue to earn degrees and certificates
in the diverse fields of technology. The passion must
come from parents to create the vision that their
children of color, culture and diversity can be successful
in all areas of STEM – Science Technology Engineering
Mathematics (Medicine), not only participate, but
contribute as well.

dcpssteam

Teachers must never exclude students from learning
about STEM, STEAM, STREAM, CSTEAM and STEM2,
they should make learning fun and most importantly
relevant as to “WHY” they need to be involved.
Technology is no longer a field that you jump into
because you like it, there are specific fields of work
and very specific skill-sets to manage and employ
specific applications to perform specific functions
or a purpose.
Education is vital because of the intricate and integrated
applications where programs, Apps and tools are integrated
onto platforms that help to solve problems.

20160423_135954

Bar Camps, WordCamps, EdCamps are great professional
development resources and unparalleled networking
opportunities. The exposure to people, products and
services helps me to improve my teaching and how to
integrate and incorporate into dynamic lessons for students
in elementary education and higher education. The resources
to inspire, encourage and motivate students to envision
that their life journeys can move into fields that are
diverse as the technology that is being developed and
integrated into everyday life.

Speaking at Bar Camp lifted my confidence level because
the focus is on “content” to inspire and motivate your
peers. Peers that don’t look like you, but are excited
just as you are to learn from you. Peers that do not
see your color, they do not worry about your culture,
but want to gain an understanding of how to improve their
abilities, skills and thinking. Taking themselves to a
higher level because of your contribution and passion
for what you know.

Wm Jackson

I’m always fascinated and excited to share what I have
learned and continue to learn not just as an educator
but as a speaker, community activist and user of
diverse technologies that can be applied to education,
ministry, mentoring youth, teens and young adults.
The words, “be part of something bigger than you are,”
has new meaning when you attend a Bar Camp, WordCamp,
EdCamp, Florida Blogging Conference, Blogging While
Brown Conference, and the growing online learning
opportunities through twitter like #EduMatch, #EduColor
and others.

20160423_092244

These 25 items are what I learned from Bar Camp
during #OrlandoTech Week in Orlando, Florida.

1. Diversity is important in technology careers. The
increase of diverse backgrounds, cultural upbringing,
and even gender provides fresh ideas to solve new
and continuing issues that we face in the world.
2. Timing is still important, you must be at the
right place at the right time to make a difference.
Show up and show out.
3. Never doubt your ability to inspire others no matter
what your educational background is, you always can
inspire others.
4. Never doubt the power to collaboration. Embrace
opportunities to work with others in difference fields.
5. Always respect the knowledge, creativity and
innovation of developers, programmers and designers.
6. If your in the field of technology it is important
to learn the language so you can communicate
effectively and speak with knowledge.
7. Network your ass off when the opportunity presents
itself. Being successful means getting involved, getting
active and sharing your Brand.
8. Volunteer your knowledge to the youth so you can
encourage another generation.
9. Respect your competition because they make you
better.
10. Get to conferences, workshops, seminars early.
The early bird gets the worm and new job or contract.

20160423_111514
11. Everyone has SWAG, you just have to discover it
and apply it.
12. Always have business cards at the ready and make
sure they represent your Brand.
13. Develop your elevator speech, a 30 second speech
can change your world and someone else.
14. Attend as many conferences, workshops, and seminars
as possible. The more you know the more you grow, the
more you go the more people know your name and abilities.
The  more you go and grow the more you can speak and
contribute.
15. Plan to attend Bar Camps, EdCamps, WordCamps to
share and apply cross disciplinary information. Your
skill level should be as diverse as your ability to talk
the talk and walk the walk.
16. Get there early for the best T-shirts, coffee and
snacks and volunteer to help setup.
17. Learn something new, you always have a new resource
that may help you expand your Brand and resources.
18.Take the opportunity to speak and share your knowledge
as a speaker. You can create a stir in 30 to 50 seconds
by sharing the right knowledge at the right time.
19. Understand if your an introvert or extrovert so you can
use those to your advantage.
20. Create and post content at least once a week and
diversify with your Brand. SEO will build your web
presence the more you post on diverse platforms.

20160423_134138

21. Keep your CV – curriculum vitae and resume current.
22. Use Instagram, Rebel mouse, and Tumblr to tell your
story when you can. If your African American integrate
being a BLERD and NERD when you can.
23. Never underestimate the power of the # hashtag. Use
it on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to connect with
other Brands that share similar interests.
24. Never under estimate or under value women and
people of color and culture in technology. Nobody likes
a bully, racist, bigot or idiot.
25. Be kind, be courteous, be humble, be authentic.

Window

Conclusion:
Inspire children, youth, teens, young adults and
even the elderly, they all can contribute. There are
growing children businesses, where children and
youth have dynamic ideas to be entrepreneurs.
To build a Brand based on being authentic and
not afraid to dream big, work hard and expand
into new territories.

Francita V Williams – https://youtu.be/_qZ2mhgYRgg
Presentation

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