My Quest To Teach

April 12, 2017

What Do You Do Before High School Graduation 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Do You Do Before
High School Graduation 2017

William Jackson, M.Ed. – Edward Waters College
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

These suggestions are to help as graduation gets closer.
Graduation, an end to an educational journey from Day
Care to High School. Before this momentous occasion
parents need to make sure all the I’s are dotted and
T’s crossed to make a smooth closure to a long journey.
These are just a few suggestions from my experiences as
a parent and a teacher.
Parents make sure your child has enough credits to
graduate and has a “diploma” not a “certificate of
completion”.

Make sure your child understands that their journey
in public education maybe coming to a conclusion,
learning does not end there. It is a continuous
life-long process, ask anyone that is successful,
successful in their career and working in a “real”
career not just a job.

 

 

 

 

1. Make sure you obtain the most recent high
school “official” transcript to send too schools
or potential employers. Many organizations,
schools and groups require a transcript to see
if academically students are “qualified” to be
eligible. The world is highly competitive and
education is the key to achievement and
advancement.

2. Make sure you have current and up to date
medical and dental records. Even after graduating
from high school students are still dependent
on their parents for certain medical services.
Parents must understand “their” graduate is not
an adult yet, they are still maturing, learning
and growing.
There is some information and documentation only
parents can obtain until children are 21 or even
25. As a parent of a 25 and 21 year old, I still
in some cases support my children outside of
money.

3. Make sure there are boundaries and expectations
on behaviors, actions, and even responsibilities
in the home for the soon to be graduates. There
should be mutual understanding on everyone’s duties
and responsibilities and always respect. Stop
telling your child they are “grown” until they are
out of your house and working independently.
Even that is not a guarantee that they will not
need some support until they are established and
able to support themselves.

4. Talk to your child’s teacher(s) about internships,
scholarships, summer employment and community
projects. Do not accept the words, “I got this,”
as being responsible and accountable. Parents end
up paying more in the long run, keep informed and
stay on your child unless they show responsibility.

5. Make hair, nail or beauty appointments months
before May to avoid the rush and chaos of getting
your child ready. Young men need to also reserve
haircuts, shaves, and clothing appointments.

6. Remind your child of the two institutions that want their
attendance Correctional (Prison) and Instructional (Higher
Education) and to make wise decisions even after graduation.
The closer it get to graduation sometimes kids lose touch
with reality and get “stupid” and maybe even “ignant” as
some seasoned seniors would say.

7. Check your child’s academic (Cumulative) folder for items
that may delay graduation or entrance into college, trade
school or the military. You have a right to see their
records and ask questions and if not provided seek an
attorney for help. Don’t wait for the last weeks to make
demands. It makes that person look like a fool because
there are 180 days in the school year, why did you wait.
Check for discipline referrals, changed grades, teacher
notes, etc. All documentation is important.

8. Make sure all deposits and fees are paid in full
before graduation. Check for lost books, needed forms
and other items that should be completed. Do not trust
your child unless they show they are responsible.
“I got this” are the words that put gray hairs
in more parents hairs because something will be
undone that costs money.

9. Know what your child’s GPA is, weighted or un-weighted.

10. Make sure your child takes or has taken the SAT
and the ACT several times.
Many schools only require one, but better safe
than sorry.

11. Check on Bright Futures scholarship information.
Many HBCU’s accept ACT scores that show your child’s
academic success and potential for future success.
Use whichever gives you a better chance of getting
into college and this may affect monies. Check athletic
scholarships, make sure it is a full ride or partial.
Does it cover books and incidentals?

12. Work on your child’s Marketable skills to help
them network and grow. Get them involved in community
events before they need community service hours, not
rushing to beg people to help and the child does not
learn anything from their experiences.

13. Set Academic, Professional, Monetary and Career
goals now so your child will have a flexible plan
of attack when they graduate.

14. Have your child volunteer consistently, stay
involved in your community, and church. Volunteer
hours can still help with networking and build
marketable skills to use later.

15. Search online and inquire with local businesses
about summer internships paid and unpaid. Your time
is valuable so unpaid is important also.

19. Join local business organizations like
Chamber of Commerce to gain marketable skills
and get a jump on career goals.

20. Participate in church events and activities
helps build your resume or CV curriculum vitae.

21. Take college tours, visiting the school
environment to make sure you are familiar with
college or even the military.

22. Social Media entries; post POSITIVE content,
pictures, text and video. Your e-Reputation and
e-Personalities tell a story about you. Social
Media content will define you and may be your
first representation of you to others.

23. Register with LinkedIn to start networking
and connecting. There is a NEW LinkedIn for
students. https://students.linkedin.com/

24. Continue to research educational options
and inquire even now about Masters and
Doctorial programs.

25. Make sure you and your child understand
what type of diploma they will have. It is
painful to expect a High School Diploma and
receive a Certificate of Attendance,
Certificate of Completion, an ESE Diploma or
others.

26. On Social Media unfriend and even block
those that are openly using drugs, weapons
and involved in criminal actions. You may be
“guilty by association” by having them part
of your network.

27. Have a “real” Social Security card, and Birth
Certificate, and if necessary a Visa to travel
abroad. Many high school students and those going
to college are even getting passports.

28. Check with your local police department to make
sure there are no records of mistaken criminal
activity from someone impersonating you or looks
like you.

29. Financial Aid and Scholarship Information can
be found online.
https://twitter.com/prepforcollege
@prepforcollege (Twitter) #CollegeChat,

30. Google and Hashtag yourself to “see” what is
online about yourself to be prepared for questions
of activities and events that your involved in.

31. Contact teachers and other professionals that
you may need letters of recommendations from them.
This is one reason why children need to be
taught to respect and honor adults because it is
the right thing to do and they WILL need their help.

32. Teach your children to be humble, approachable,
honest, responsible and accountable for their
actions. The world is sometimes an unforgiving
place and if mistakes are made sometimes an
apology is accepted, but if one is not given
that can be counted against them.

Parents sometimes it is hard to accept that the
apple does not fall far from the tree. So take
extra care to support your child to build
their confidence, to be proactive and
responsible.

The world has changed, being prepared means
being a well-rounded individual with people
skills, confidence and that understanding that
the world is based on global competition.
Teach your children early about the value of
having an education and being a life-long learner.

If interested in getting into business for girls,
young women and adult women Xplosion 2017
is for  you…

 

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January 27, 2017

What’s Next for Hidden Figures In The Future

What’s Next for Hidden Figures In  The Future
by William Jackson

taylor-and-mom

Congratulations to Latanya Richardson and her daughter
Taylor Richardson for the success of showing Hidden
Figures in Jacksonville, Florida to over 200 girls.
The awesome story of how African American women
helped NASA to put astronauts into space and bring
them back to earth.
Girls and women from around Jacksonville, Florida
attended representing groups and schools from
around the city. As a teacher I had the honor to bring
several students from Venetia Elementary School a
Medical Magnet STEM that teaches grade K to 5th 
and
a Lee High School student. My only regret is
that I could not bring more.

fb_img_1445084296495

The emotional and psychological inspiration of
this movie demands to ask what is next to keep
the seriousness and the historical value of this
movie moving forward. STEM and STEAM that
are being applied in the educational cultures of
schools is seen as not only career necessary, but
has scientific, business and commerce influences
in this country and on a global scale.
The movie brilliantly showed not just the struggles
of women in the NASA Space Program, but showed
the value and application of their education.
The reason why educational degrees are important,
the value of visiting the library to learn new things
and applying them to real world situations, and the
personal responsibility to prepare for the future.

book-hf

There were many scenes where the women were called
“computers” as their analytical abilities where recognized,
but only later were they respected after showing and
demanding equality through leadership opportunities and
promotions that were withheld only because of their color.
Working with many types of math and integrating
mathematical equations that sometimes had to be created.
This shows that girls and women have the skill sets and
analytical abilities to function in complex and STEAM
areas that demand creativity and innovation.

Hidden Figures addressed several civil rights issues in the
areas of political and educational equality that in some cases
are still being addressed for Black
s, Hispanics and others of
color,
the struggle still continues and there
have been many successes.

group-picture

Girls and women will take away many lessons from the
movie and see how history was changed not just by
protests, by going to school to earn advanced degrees,
learning the laws of the nation, how to speak properly
without using profanity, the importance of family unity
and support and setting goals that everyone works towards.

Another important key is to carry or act like there is
self-pride, cultural respect and intelligence.
 A key lesson
shared is that children  
learned early that education is
the ticket to a better life even when there are
struggles
and
challenges to be overcome.

Even seeing the implementation of “new” technologies
at the time when early computers where not as easy to
use, but there was continued learning in programming
languages that demanded studying and forward thinking.
The movement to gaining educational parity and equality
is a great value for boys and girls of color, this movie is
worth seeing again and applied to the learning initiatives
in all schools to allow students to see the why they
need to be serious about their education and the vision
for their dreams of success.

ibm

Seeing the new IBM computers being used, but it
took a woman to learn the programming language to
make it work sends a message that women are as smart
and intelligent as men, even if those men are Black
or white.
There are no barriers than can stop girls and women
from gaining l
eadership skill-sets and applying the
intelligence to make positive and historical changes.
Parents, mothers, fathers, and grandparents if you
have not seen Hidden Figures take your children and
other children if possible to see this movie that not
only shows the historical application of education
and cultural  pride and respect, that gender is not
a liability
, color is not a curse, there is a blending of
historical successes and  global influence.

movie-relaxing

Hidden Figures opens the mind’s eye that anything is
possible, t
hat dreams can be achieved, and intelligence
is Dope and Lit.
What is next is up to parents, schools, churches and
communities to support children, youth and teens.
Time will tell, graduations rates from high school
and college will tell and the growing number of girls
and boys of co
lor in  STEM careers will tell.

 

July 27, 2016

If You Think School Is Hard In America

If You Think School Is Hard In America
by William Jackson, M.Ed.
Edward Waters College

The process of education is an evolving process
of continuous change, modification, and adaptation.
Rigor, differentiation, literacy, comprehension,
assessments and other terms that are used in the
process of educating children from birth to higher
education and beyond. Educators and parents
can become overwhelmed and confused in this
process of education as curriculum’s change.

This blog is influenced by the recent national
discussion on the need for an educated society
and how children are influenced and encouraged
to learn in the classrooms of this nation and
the application of STEM STEAM STREAM.

I wanted to reference the education of students
globally and the educational support of parents
of color and culture nationwide in America.
Parents need to accept their responsibility for the
educational success of their children and to be
involved with the educational process especially
reading and math.
This is NOT to say parents are not involved,
this is in reference to those that make excuses
for not attending parent/teacher conferences,
eating lunch at least once in the school year with
their kids and will not return teacher phone calls
or notes for parental support with disruptive and
struggling students.

Teachers need parental support and parents
need to be actively involved in schools from Pre-K
to High School. As another school year starts thus
the fashion extravaganza will begin. Everyone
wants to look good the first week, but what of
the 175 remaining days of academic rigor and work?

This nation provides a FREE education, supported
by tax dollars. There have been educational
think-tanks, educational committees, and focus
groups that assess and monitor how students are
educated. The universal ideology is that education
is important to the economic welfare of the
people of the United States of America no
matter the color or culture. All children need to
be educated to survive.
“This country needs an educated workforce
to compete globally.” Diverse Education
http://diverseeducation.com/article/11325/

One important fact that cannot be ruled out,
eliminated or downplayed is that in this country
education is important. Nowhere else in the world is
there an educational system like the United
States of America. The foundation is based
on parents being the “First Educator” for their
children. The importance of parents is stated as:
“Parenting involves taking responsibility seriously,
taking advantage of every opportunity to enhance
children’s learning, and providing children with
challenges that contribute to growth and development.”
Parents As First Teachers, Abelardo Villarreal, Ph.D.

Parental responsibility is to teach basic
foundational skills and reinforce these with
children before they start school. As an
educator of over 20 years and Teacher of the
Year in my district, I want to share
with parents that interaction with children
and the experiences that are provided can
guide children’s growth and development.

Children should be taken to the library
to build respect in the empowerment of
reading and literacy, they will appreciate
reading when they see their parents excited
about reading.
Children taken to the museum they will
appreciate culture, diversity and historical
connections that they are part of a global
community of humanity.  Children taken
to science centers they will appreciate
science and technology, understand why
STEM and STEAM are valuable to them.

There is work that needs to be done to
educate children and it starts at home. No
matter the educational level of parents, all
parents want the best for their children, but
sometimes need guidance and help.

Part 2 Next

Resources:
Scholarships to continue education.
Ashley Hill
Twitter @prepforcollege
Host of #CollegeChat
Web http://www.collegeprepready.com/

Black Male Achievement
http://ebm.e.foundationcenter.org/c/tag/hBXj47hB8ixY9B9P$S8AAAAAANr/

GetConnectDad – @GetConnectDad – #GetConnectDAD

Parents As First Teachers
http://www.idra.org/IDRA_Newsletter/April_2005_Self_
Renewing_Schools_Reading_and_Literacy/Parents_As_First_Teachers/

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