My Quest To Teach

November 14, 2016

Learn to Speak in Digital So Lo Mo Environments

 

 

 

Learn to Speak in Digital
So Lo Mo Environments
by William Jackson
Edward Waters College @wmjackson
#MyQuestToTeach
Do you understand the power of:
So social Lo local Mo mobile how to implement the
right technology.
Using digital tools and the integration of SoLoMo,
“Black Millennials are using their power to successfully
raise awareness of issued facing the Black community
and influence decisions shaping our world.”
http://mediaconfidential.blogspot.com/2016/10/
nielsen-black-millennials-close-digital.html

The ability to communicate using digital tools is important
in an age of progressive digital technologies. Mobile tech
has changed the way people are communicating daily.
Smartphones, tablets, watches and other digital mobile
devices allow for new methods to connect with family,
friends, and professional learning communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software is becoming increasingly
intelligent and intuitive.
Whether you have an Android
or an iPhone the ability to
connect, collaborate and communicate has become
simplistic and literally at the touch of a button(s).
If you want to be taken seriously and looked upon as a
valuable resource you have to talk the talk, using the
words that connect like minds and even like goals.
No matter the age, generation, gender or life style
technology has the ability to connect two or two million.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use your Social Media platforms to:
1. Be conversational
*the range of applications is as flexible as the type of
devices that are available.
*conversation is the foundation for networking and
building relationships.
*The power is in the software.
2. Share content – Sharing is Caring
*sharing content is important to growth and development
*the ability to create content, share content and archive
allows for influencing the present and the future.
3. Write / Blog Content is King
*to be a better blogger, you must write as much as possible.
*content creation is king as stated by Bill Gates in many
seminars and conferences.
*write to live and live to write is practiced in academia.
4. Build your e-Reputation, e-Personality, e-Reliability
*having a reputation or a personality requires some type
of Social Media presence.
*the debate is still going on which one is better,
*the more the better depending on what audience you are
trying to reach.
5. Learn to listen
*teach yourself to listen to people talking about how
they use technology.
*learn the difference between integration, implementation,
and initiation of technology.
*join Meetups, EdCamps, and other social events that
connect like-minded people.
6. Take the time to read
*even though YouTube can provide almost all your instructional
needs, reading still cannot be beat.
*read about those that are innovators and smart creators.
7. Collaborate – Cooperation – Association
*CCA to build your knowledge, build your Brand and learn how
to Market your ideas and skills.
8. Understand your community
*you cannot be friends with everyone on all Social Media platforms.
*learn which sites are beneficial to your needs.
*don’t lose your time on useless Social Media sites that are
not productive.
9. Say more with less
*Twitter is 140 characters
*how can you communicate in 140 characters or less effectively?
10. Social Media is a “pull system” you must know your audience.
*understand who your following
*why your following someone
*who is following you
*why are they following you
11. Find your Niche
*finding your Niche is important
*your Niche is your voice and your presence online

 

 

 

 

 

12. How do you want people
to remember you?
*content rarely goes away,
it is archived, saved,
packaged and stored someplace
online.
*you create a digital legacy with your content.
*people will remember you through your content.
13. Build a personal mission statement
*when using Social Media build a mission statement
that can help you grow academically and professionally
14. Remember Social Media is about relationships.
*building relationships is important.
*how do you build relationships online?
*remember everyone does not have the same
mission as you are so be careful.
15. Develop your elevator pitch for those unique
times when you have one opportunity to make an
impression.
*Social Media may provide a one-time shot to pitch
your ideas to the “right” person so have your pitch
ready to go.
16. You cannot be shy in the Blogging / Technology
Industry.
*technology opens opportunities nationally and
globally as never before.
*being shy will get you literally no where.
*to be successful you cannot afford to be shy or
hesitant
17. Don’t view other bloggers as competition,
they are opportunities for collaboration.
*sometimes it is better to collaborate not compete
18. Brand vs Visual Identity
*learn the difference.
*how do people see you online?
19. Your Brand is your Promise
*your Brand continues to grow as your knowledge
and abilities grow.
*mentor and be a role model.
20. Your Brand and Niche should be a safe place,
make sure your association is approachable.
*what type of people are you associated with?
*do they have the same direction, mission and goals
as you do?
21. Be Authentic
*no one can be you, but you.
*don’t try to be something you are not
*don’t steal someone else’s ideas
*think about what you bring to the table.
22. Social Media can bridge Culture
*diversity is a good thing.
*diversity is a verb.
23. Be careful about being assimilated
*assimilation, association and application are
important.
24. You do not have to know everything
*apply what you learn and allow yourself to grow.
25. Attend conferences and Socials
*connect, socialize and be friends.
*never doubt your ability to be creative and innovative.

 

 

 

“Build your Brand as having
authority over your life.”
Wm Jackson
 

 

 

 

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November 4, 2016

The Humanity of Fatherhood

The Humanity of Fatherhood
William Jackson, M.Edu
Edward Waters College
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

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Chinua Achebe, “We cannot trample upon
the humanity of others without devaluing our
own.” The Igbo, always practical, put it
concretely in their proverb:
Onye ji onye n’ani ji onwe ya:
“He who will hold another down in the mud
must stay in the mud to keep him down.”
The Education of a British-Protected Child: Essays

“Fathers, it is time to lift our children, our families,
our culture, our communities from the mud
of poverty, death and destruction.”
William Jackson – My Quest To Teach

Watching the media and the continued deaths
of young men and young women, fathers have
a choice to be a blessing or a curse to their
children, to embed humanity into their process
of raising their families. To lead them to a life
of safety and growth or condemn them to
potential sentences of poverty, lack of
educational success and a societal voice of
silence.

Fathers are supposed to be the foundation,
the rock that their families can stand on during
the storms of life and the challenges that they
will face. The national deaths by violence of
children of color and culture are a signal that
too many fathers are not doing their jobs,
importantly too many men are not parenting,
fathering, guiding and mentoring. Too many
are talking, their lips are moving, but their feet
and hearts are standing still. There is work to
do in their communities, but too many fathers
are counterproductive and adding to the
troubles their communities are facing.

 

 

 

Fathers are influential in the social and
educational directions of their children, they set
the tones for social interaction, establishing the
direction of their children and others around
them, growing and developing the social skills
and humbleness that boys and girls developing
into men and women will need. Children are
modeling their father’s activities, mentalities,
their lack of compassion and lack of sensitivities
to their children. The father is the model whether
at home or not, looking at the communities of
color and culture too many fathers are not
involved or do not care.

Social skills are not just necessary social requirements;
they are the patterns of behaviors for survival that boys
and girls of color and culture will need to know in order
to grow in a society that is still struggling with boys and
girls of diversity and color. The directions of life take
many twists and turns for youth especially African
American youth, this is NOT another hate the system
or hate the government blog, nor is it a blog on what
the educational system is not accomplishing.

This blog addresses the responsibilities of “Men in
the Village” to re-evaluate and re-prioritize their thinking
and to be of service to their communities.
The great Nigerian author Chinua Achebe through his
writings tries to teach men that positive emotions to
their children are beneficial and “do not
fear being
thought weak as a man” because men show emotions,
they should to establish a connection with their families.

Men have a right that extends to the accountability and
responsibility to be involved in their children’s educational
growth and development. How can hundreds if not
thousands of men attend sporting events in support
of their children, but cannot consistently volunteer, visit,
mentor, support their children’s schools that are preparing
them for life in this nation?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Achebe shares, “(fathers) do not show any human emotions
and sentiments so as not to be seen as weak,” are creating
un-caring societies where children are forgetting the value
of love, compassion, sympathy and honor. Men do not have
to cry to show emotions, but should hug and kiss their children,
hold their hands and provide emotional support and
mental comfort just as African men have done for centuries.
How many men can blame the State Attorney’s Office
and law enforcement if they won’t “man up” handling
their “business” and parental responsibilities in raising
their children? Prisons are not Day Cares, Learning
Centers, Enrichment Organizations; how many men can
blame the school district if they have not started the
process of educating their children in the basics of
reading, math and social behaviors at home that allow
for education in a formal setting to start. Learning
starts at home and fathers need to be responsible
for this happening.

The streets, back alleys, street corners and clubs of
our communities will teach skills that will lead to
death or prison as seen in children today, what real
father can be proud of that?

Fathers need to be involved in a dialogue that teaches
with love and wisdom, young fathers
need help. Children should be seen holding their
fathers hands, sitting on their laps and involved in
activities that build critical thinking skills, encourage
problem solving abilities and promote higher order
thinking that creates language development, increased
vocabulary and appreciation for being intelligent.

“People say that if you find water rising up to your ankle,
that’s the time to do something about it, not when it’s
around your neck.” Chinua Achebe
African American communities are finding crime and
death inching around their necks, they should do
something positive about it to make a change in their
communities. When “not snitching” is more important
than a child’s life that was taken by a bullet is the priority
the humanity has been taken away. Human life is not
valued and is less than that of an animal.
Because of continuous generational tragedies young
people of color are thereby increasing their likelihood
of entering correctional facilities, and if daddy is not
there who do kids model except who they see on the
street or movies?

To keep children of color and culture from entering
into the “pipeline” prevention and pro-action is needed.
Fathers are an important part of this effort, fathers need
to be trained and encouraged. Ronnie Cage, community
activist and national trainer for fathers and fathering skills
has encouraged fathers need training to be fathers for
years.
Parenting is a powerful force; parents have a spiritual
connection to their children and a responsibility to raise
them. Research from the University of Maryland (2000)
indicates that, “children who have fathers or father figures
in their lives learn better, have higher self-esteem and
show fewer signs of depression and aggression.”
“…children who identified a father or father figure
scored higher on basic learning skill tests and had
a stronger sense of competence and social acceptance
compared to children without fathers”
(University of Maryland Medical News, 2000).

Fact “Black males represent six percent of the U.S.
population, yet 35 percent
of the prison population and less than two percent
of teachers” Morehouse College Educational
Conference 2009.
All these have an effect on the mental and emotional
state of children of color and culture.
In the beginning man was created first to care for the
world, so men must take the lead and be a part of
their children’s lives before cemeteries and prisons
have more children
in them than schools and playgrounds.

July 2, 2016

Applying the Wisdom of Wole Soyinka to African Americans

Applying the Wisdom of Wole Soyinka to African Americans
by William Jackson, M.Ed.
Edward Waters College
@wmjackson Twitter

The writings of Wole Soyinka
have inspired millions in Africa
and around the world. He is
the first African to receive
the Nobel Peace
Prize in literature and helped
to start a literary movement
with other writers like
Chinua Achebe and others that
energized a continent and sought
to change a nation.

He has inspired those that love the diversity of
writing, not just personal stories, but of literary
content and diversity that expands the intelligence
and inspires intellectual discussions.
Raised in an environment of religious change
and political chaos along with a priority of
educational attainment and civic growth. Soyinka
was born in an era of colonization, and conflict.
Civil discourse and the drive for independence from
British rule in his native Nigeria. The violence
of a growing democracy reaching to branch out
of civil wars and military dictatorships.

The growth of writers of color and culture is
important to tell the stories of people of
color and culture. From Africa to Asia, from
South America to Saudi Arabia and from the
Arctic to Antarctica, people are writing to tell
their stories.

The explosion of writing camps, seminars,
conferences, meetups and other events are
attended by more and more African American
writers to strengthen their knowledge of the
writing process, building readership and gaining
more exposure to the craft of story creation and
authorship. Writers have a growing responsibility
to be politically and civilly active.
In the past 5 years more women of color are
writing on platforms that are so diverse they are
meeting the needs of issues unimaginable to
discuss just 2 to 4 years ago. Traditionally men
were the bloggers, podcasters, microbloggers and
content creators of the bloggersphere from the
80’s of early blogging until the mid-2000’s when
women caught on to the connectivity of
blogging/writing.  Women of color and culture have
a solidarity because of the lack of respect from
mass media. Women tackle issues that face them,
they don’t dance around them, there is a seriousness
that is felt and experienced globally.

Now women are dominating the digital platforms of
the Internet and running with content exclusively
tackling the issues that women can relate to, identify
with and share with other women no matter their
cultural diversity of lifestyle.
My writing growth is infused from listening to the
interviews of Wole Soyinka, Chinua Achebe and
other African writers who are politically, culturally
and socially active. African American students
need to be exposed to writing even  before they attend
higher education. African American students need
to apply innovative and critical thinking skills which
are gained through reading, writing and intellectual
thought.
Here are 21 ways to help the growth of African
American communities to build writers,
educators, business leaders, thought leaders,
intellectuals and help African Americans
embrace the entrepreneurial spirit.

The Wisdom of Wole Soyinka
Applied to African American Writers

“A tiger does not shout its Tigritude,
it acts.” Wole Soyinka

1. African Americans have the
potential to launch their own political
party, but are too segmented in their
political, economic and educational visions.

2. African Americans must learn to
make transformative changes in politics,
it is not about the position at the top, but
how the people are provided quality
services that provide help to families
that help with stability, equal access to
educational resources and health care
from birth to death.

3. African Americans must have a
manifesto outlining their political
vision and mission for all people
not just African Americans.

4. African Americans seasoned as
political professionals must be willing
to have a far reaching vision for
generations in the future, not just
for their personal political gains.

5. African Americans must have a
solid Brand, not one based on
reparations of past behaviors
by whites, but solid progressive
thinking to allow for growth by all
cultures.

6. African Americans must support,
praise, build on their boys and girls
academic accomplishments.
Athletics and entertainment cannot
boost economic stability, athletics
cannot influence scientific research
and development, athletics cannot
build academic curriculums to build
colleges and universities. Academics
combined with athletics builds
scholars.

7. African Americans must position
themselves to learn from others. They
must build minds that embrace
democratic concepts and principles.

8. African Americans must move
from being excited and inspired by
personalities that provide temporary
emotional excitement. They must
embrace the intellectual abilities
of its youth and build them into
social leaders first.

9. African Americans must be able
to build leaders that have the ability
to bridge cultural, economic and
educational gaps.

10. African Americans must move
away from the mentality of colonization
and the culture of slavery.

11. African Americans must break free
of the mentalities beaten into them from
slavery and colonization about Africans
and African heritage.

12. African American men
must be their models and
methods to improve African
Americans communities.

13. African Americans must have the
honesty to talk about social issues that
divide homes, communities, churches and
schools. There needs to be a platform
to discuss these issues.

14. African Americans must stop pretending
to be scared to grow beyond their abilities.
They must recognize their potential to be
greater than they are.

15. African Americans in politics will be judged
not by the amount of times they are elected
and re-elected, but by the lives they improved
from slavery (mental and physical), increased
educational and employment opportunities
and gender equality.

16. African Americans must own their own
media outlets, they cannot continue to offer
only once a week or bi-weekly news, they
must be competitive and forward thinking.
Using Social Media platforms, tools and Apps.

17. African Americans must have agendas
that focus on building partnerships within the
African American community.

18. African American businesses must partner
with schools to be business partners, to build an
employment pool from which to provide
opportunities to African American students to
gain experience, internships and offering
scholarships.

19. African Americans must grow beyond
consumers and expand into producers

20. African American writers should be
engaged in civil events, activities and
teaching the next generation of writers.

21. African American students in high
school and college should not be scrambling
for internships, scholarships and employment
opportunities. This is why African Americans
need to grow in STEAM areas to produce
the resources for children to grow beyond
self-perceived or societal perceptions for
children of color.

“Books and all forms of
writing are terror to
those who wish to suppress
the truth.”
Wole Soyinka
 

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