My Quest To Teach

March 6, 2017

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself

 

 

 

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself
by Pro. William Jackson
Educational Technology and Social Media
Edward Waters College @wmjackson

HBCU students in the 21st century cannot wait to market themselves
in a world of global commerce, digital Branding, intellectual sharing
and the vast Social Media sites that are building to get the word out
there about the talents, abilities and skills that HBCU students possess.

HBCU students still struggle and have faced more challenges in the past
8 years as HBCU institutions struggle to remain relevant, real and respiratory.
Even with the promises coming by the Trump administration there will
be strings attached, policies to follow, procedures to implement and even
expectations that need to be achieved.  This is not a handout, I hope it is
a help up for these historic institutions and if any money is provided
it is not mismanaged, lost in ill-advised policies nor “misplaced.”

Internal struggles have been a challenge at HBCUs either through faculty
stability, administration interaction with faculty and students or the
changes in generations of priorities. The retention and graduation of
students especially males is a serious issue that needs to be addressed.

The debate about the relevancy of HBCUs continues, data shows that a
high percentage of Black educators that are successful and work in the
most challenging schools graduate from HBCUs and continue on to
earn their advanced degrees. HBCU students are involved in STEM
careers even before STEM and STEAM where aligned with
educational initiatives.

As a graduate of an HBCU South Carolina State University ’85 and an
instructor at Edward Waters College,  the oldest HBCU in Florida, the
struggle is real and in many cases is overcome with each victory of students
graduating and becoming gainfully employed.

Teaching Educational Technology and Social Media the challenge is
teaching students how to compete for jobs before graduation, how to
Brand, then Market to a world of global competition and even tougher
globalization. This blog is about why HBCU students should market
themselves before graduation, usually starting in their junior year to
network with and collaborate with the “right folks.” Instilling in students
that if you want to be an educator, hangout with educators, if you want
to be a lawyer network with attorneys, if you want to even be a gamer
then learn from, compete with and against, and importantly network
with other gamers.

The most dangerous thing that keeps HBCU students from gaining their
dreams and aspirations is being afraid to network, speak with, talk to and
exposed to the diversity that world has to offer. Talking to my students I
share that you will not lose whatever “Blackness” you have if you have a
diversity of friends, associates, networking groups that can empower,
motivate, engage and collaborate with.

These suggestions are designed to help
HBCU students get out of their mental
boxes and to be less introverted and
race conscious
of fear and self-imposed apprehension.

Suggestions to motivate and encourage
for students and educators:

1. Learn how to market yourself before you
search for jobs, before you graduate, either
at the start or before your junior year of
higher education, vocational school or even
the transition from military service to civilian life.
2. Marketing shows your worth, talents, abilities,
work ethic, leadership abilities, being able to
function in diverse environments, acceptance
and tolerance of diversity.
Learn what marketing is….
3. The ability to adapt to the diversity of cultures, technology, responsibility
and accountability for success and failures needs to be learned. That does
not mean babying students it means teaching students how to adapt their
biases, stereotypes that they may have and how to professionally deal with
potential situations and circumstances.
4. HBCU students must always see themselves as investments.
The more you grow and improve the better investment you are to yourself
and future employers.
5. Don’t wait until your senior  year to rush to create a dope or lit resume,
start the first year and build by creating a living document of accomplishments,
volunteerism, learning, leadership, community activism and collaboration.

As a professor in higher education and as a elementary teacher it hurts my
spirit when students state “why do I have to do that”, I don’t wanna be
bothered with those people.” My response is, “do the right people know you
in the career you want or just those that do not want to see you grow beyond
them?”

6. Show yourself as well rounded; the combination of academics, job-training,
extra-curricular activities, volunteerism, all need to show your contribution to
things bigger than you are. Are you a part of something bigger than you?
7. Look at the world globally not just locally. Jacksonville, Florida is the largest
city in the USA by land mass. Students are encouraged in my class to have a
global perspective of the world. The smallest global event in their major can
have major implications on employment and involved in global markets.
8. Believe that your major course of study will have national and
potentially international influence as  you grow and take on more responsibility.
The road to leadership is driven not by money, but by willing to work hard to
make a difference in the world.
9. Learn to be familiar with foreign languages.  Dedicate yourself that you will
learn a new language especially one where you may have to use when traveling.
HBCU students can be heard talking that someday I want to, I might, maybe if.
They want to travel overseas, they do not take the time to plan, execute the plan
or even save to meet the plan. You have to start with a plan!!!
10. HBCU students network with cultural groups and participate in community
events like festivals and networking socials. Never assume that there is already
someone at an event that knows what you know. You have a wealth of inform-
ation that no one else knows.
11. It is important for HBCU students to learn how to integrate Social Media
tools and platforms beyond joking with their friends, booty calls, partying,
clubbing and acting a fool. This multi-functional, diversely dynamic platforms
can allow for communication with employers around the world. These
platforms can help start a career or end a career before it gets started.
12. Being technology savvy is important and just as importantly is how to
apply that knowledge. Use your knowledge to be involved in community
initiatives that build communities, that bring people together and open doors
for collaboration.
13. Have a reliable list of resources to help you grow.
The library services at Edward Waters College has one of the best resources
in its library staff. Emma Kent is a knowledgeable and dedicated professional
that embraces technology. Accentuating the services the library at Edward
Waters College offers. Too many students at HBCUs do not take the time
to get to know their library professionals that have a wealth of information
waiting to share and becoming friends with them. One of the best moves
for me was to be friends with the librarians, custodial staff, be nice to
the cafeteria man and women and secretaries. They became my “extra”
parents with prayers, advice and even extra food on my meal trays!!
14. HBCU students must adapt their thinking as they matriculate through the
years. Their ideas, opinions, skills, networks must change. This change should
be seen in their attire, their speech and self-confidence. Being a lifelong
learner brings benefits that will be seen in the future not just in the present.
15. Applying to both males and females, your visual personality is just as
important as your e-personality and e-reputation. Make the conscious effort
to protect yourself in the direction of your career goals and dreams.
16. During your growth take advantage of tutoring and learning outside of
academics. Attend tutoring for interview skills, cultural understanding, career
counseling, and even role playing directed at your career interests.
The more prepared you are the better prepared you are.
Obtain a mentor, someone that has life experiences, and sees your potential
that you do not. Someone that sees you as an investment to a better
future and learn from them.

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February 26, 2017

A Girls Journey Into Social Media

A Girls Journey Into Social Media
by William Jackson and Breyonna Fox
My Quest to Teach

JIW Group Photo.jpg

Journey Into Womanhood a wonderful collaboration of
young ladies from elementary age to high school held a
workshop  dedicated to teaching about Social Media
safety and responsibility, the prevention of Cyberbullying
and the problems Sexting causes in destroying a girls
reputation and potentially their future career choices.

Elexia Coleman the director and visionary of the program
provides educational,  intellectual, culturally bonding and
community experiences that help girls and young  ladies
grow and blossom in an environment that is encouraging
and engaging.

JIW is an opportunity for girls and young ladies to experience
presentations on multiple levels of activity; professionals like
William Jackson and his intern Breyonna Fox talked to the
ladies on serious subjects that potentially influence decisions
that can have social and career influences.

20170211_101647(0).jpg
Asya and Breyonna Fox

Ms. Fox spoke on her experiences on being bullied and how
Sexting can destroy lives and involve law enforcement.
Ms. Fox shared how girls in high school are under the false
ideas that Sexting is glamorous until their photos are shared
with others that where not intended to see them because of
breaking up with friends and trying to impress a boy or girl.

Boys are involved in Sexting as well and can suffer social and
criminal investigation. There are legal issues that could result
in charges of pornography and child endangerment that may
follow a boy or girl through their life. Ms. Fox shared that  each
girl present  should have personal self-confidence and
self-respect. “The unfortunate reality is that  girls and women
have committed suicide because of Bullying and Sexting.”
Breyonna Fox

william-jackson

William Jackson a teacher in the public school system and a
Professor at Edward Waters College shares with the young
ladies that there is nothing a boy or man can provide that is
more important than personal respect and pride. Through
education a young lady and woman can achieve great things
above and beyond the material things a person like a boy or
girl can give them.

The title of the workshop, “How to be Dope and Responsible
on Social Media,” is available to other organizations that work
with youth, teens and young  adults.  Mr. Jackson speaks at the
international conference Preventing Crime in the Black
Community on preventing bullying, cyberbullying, the power
of incorporating STEM in  education and many aspects of
Social Media.

Volunteers are key to the success of JIW program that will be
celebrating the end of another program year on
Sunday, April 9th  2017 at their annual banquet. JIW is a 501c3
program and accepts donations to provide services to the
participants that will have life-long influence to help the
young ladies grow into future leaders in business, finance,
commerce, education and other careers that fulfill dreams.

The rewarding results of JIW can be seen in the community
involvement of girls and young ladies like Taylor Richardson
#AstronautStarBright, she is working to become an astronaut
and travel to Mars and back,  Taylor and her mom are working
to help girls and women in Jacksonville to see the movie
“Hidden Figures.” They were both invited by the Obama
administration to the White House premiere. Sitting with
current and past NASA astronauts, the actors of Hidden
Figures, First Lady Michelle Obama and other dignitaries.

20170211_101554

Taylor along with other young ladies are doing extraordinary
things in the community and bringing awesome media and news
reports of the great contributions young ladies are providing in
Jacksonville, Florida.

Sponsorship’s and donations are welcomed by JIW to help
continue the works they do in the community that influence
positive directions and accomplishments.

 Resources:
Journey Into Womanhood – http://theconnectory.org/program/journey-into-womanhood-2
JIW Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/empowerment.resources/
The Program
http://www.empowermentresourcesinc.org/what-we-do/journey-into-womanhood-program/

Additional Photos from 2017 -2016 – 2015 Workshops on
STEAM – Cyberbullying – Social Media – Sexting – Education

February 6, 2017

My Hidden Figures Reflection

20170121_134337
Taylor and students from Venetia Elementary and Lee High School

My Hidden Figures Reflection
By: Breyonna Fox,
Blogging Intern with My Quest To Teach
Jacksonville, Florida
My first thought when I finished watching Hidden
Figures was, “Wow, they actually did all of those
things, like they accomplished their goals.” I thought
this was very inspirational, because back then it was
very hard for other races besides Caucasians, to do
the things they wanted and love. In the movie there
is a part when Mary Jackson’s husband even doubts
her accomplishing her dreams, showing how
un-motivated people were and how many dreams
were simply crushed and forgotten.

Then there was Dorothy Vaughn who wanted to be
a supervisor for her group of women who are highly
skilled with computers. She wanted to move on with
her dreams when she realized Katherine and Mary
was moving up with theirs. NASA wouldn’t make
her a supervisor though, she worked hard and even
acted like a supervisor to her group of woman. Then
one day she got a huge offer, but she would only do
it if her girls were with her as well. So they allowed it.
She finally became a supervisor. She is the first
African American woman to supervise a staff
at the West Area Computers Division. Another part
in the movie shows when she took her sons to the
library to get some books to help her out with work,
they ended up getting kicked out, just because
Dorothy needed the book, but the library was whites’
only.

20170121_111854

It was upsetting to see how she couldn’t check
out the book and then the security guard pushed
her sons out as well. Then when she got on the
bus she still had the book on her and when her
sons asked why and she said she pays taxes
and those taxes help the library out. I know
Dorothy is a very witty and strong person. She
stayed determined in what she believed in and
knew she could accomplish her goals, she didn’t
leave her girls and moved them up with her.

Mary Jackson, wanted to become an engineer,
in the beginning she had doubts about it. She
was talking about it with her co-worker and she
said how impossible it felt, her co-workers told
her she could do it, because they were already
doing the impossible. I thought about what she
said and how she had hope that Mary could
accomplish her goals. It showed me even when
things feel impossible, they aren’t. She even
went to court to fight for what she wanted and
got night classes at University, an all-white
school! That was amazing. I really loved that part,
because that filled so much hope in Mary and
made her believe more in herself that she could
accomplish a lot more things after that, Mary
Jackson became the first female African
American NASA engineer. Mary is a sassy, brave
and determined for what she fights for.
Last, but not least was Katherine Goble,
she was strongly skilled in mathematics and
had an analytical mind. She got a new assignment
by Al Harrison, so she had to move to a new
part of the company.

When she was getting escorted, the woman told her,
“you will be the first black person here. Don’t make
me regret choosing you. Most people only last a few
days, so don’t get used to it.” Then when Katherine
entered everyone stared at her. Her co-workers were
rude towards her as well. She went to grab some
coffee and everyone was staring at her. She
immediately felt uncomfortable and sat down and
sipped her coffee slowly. After that incident they
got a second coffee maker and it said “colored”,
she went to use it, it was empty, sending a message.

This showed me how even though Katherine
accomplished her goals, there will always be people
trying to bring her down. Then she got upset and
explained to Harrison how rude everyone was acting
towards her and how she never got pearls and how
no one wants to use the same coffee maker as her,
since earlier she was always in the bathroom and he
would ask where she went. Then the next day he
tore down the “whites only” bathroom and the
“colored” signs and he said, “no whites or colored,
we’re all the same here.” That showed me how
Al Harrison really cared about Katherine as an
employee and he didn’t care about skin color.

Then when Katherine got engaged, her co-workers
got her a pearl necklace, which was Harrison’s ideas
too, which she wore to her wedding. Then later on in
the movie, when John Glenn was going to orbit
around earth, he said he only trusted Katherine with
her calculations and with his safety, he knew she
was brilliant and he only trusted her not the computer
machine. He was right too, he had trouble up in space,
but he got back safe.

Katherine played a huge roll in John Glenn’s journey
and Apollo space program landing a man on the moon.
In 2015, Katherine received National Medal of Freedom
from President Obama.

breyonna-fox
Breyonna Fox, blogger

This movie showed me that anything you set your mind
to you can accomplish. You just have to stay determined
and full of courage. This movie is very inspiring and
does prove to other women and girls they can do things
even when they feel it’s out of their reach.
Edited by Prof. William Jackson  #MyQuestToTeach

Resources dedicated to women
TEDxFSCJ Salon: Lift as We Climb:
Women Race and Politics
Thursday, February 16, 2017
6:00pm – 8:00pm
FSCJ – Downton Campus
Auditorium A-1068
http://www.tedxfscj.com/events/

Real Talk Real Change
We Are Women Hear Us More..
Thursday, February 16, 2017
6:00pm – 8:00pm
Riverside North – 2711 Edison Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
rtrc20viii20-20fb20cover20-20320sponsors_0

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