My Quest To Teach

August 15, 2016

HBCUs Must Inspire Next Generation of Bloggers

HBCUs Must Inspire Next Generation of Bloggers
by William Jackson, Edward Waters College
Educational Technology

The explosion of blogging has transitioned beyond the
limitations of text, there is VBlogging, MicroBlogging, Podcasting
and other platforms to share cultural, political, educational,
and dynamic content.
The importance of writing can never be understated in the
areas of education and business writing, it is still crucial to the
sharing and disseminating of information. Writing shows the
foundation of intelligence  and engaging ideas and concepts.

As an instructor
teaching Educational
Technology and
Social Media at
Edward Waters College,
I have always felt that
blogging allows  for
growth and

networking. The challenge is to get HBCU students to see beyond
their personal perceptions that are limited by lack of exposure
and expand their digital vision to see the benefits of creating and
mastering their digital footprints.
This exposure can expand  networking opportunities and
collaboration that can lead to employment and the start of careers.
Content can make or break an HBCU student’s ability to gain
employment.
Businesses are looking for talent that has a passion for challenges
and diversity; looking at HBCUs’ for professionals. HBCU men and
women that can integrate technology with creativity and innovation
have valuable skills that are sought after.
HBCU students should be taught to be aggressive, confident and
prepared. The increase of conferences show there is a need for
professional development, workshops, seminars
and teaching Marketing/Branding in the 21st century by creating
or branding with knowledge in areas of need.

Blogging, Microblogging, Podcasting Vblogging can aid in
the Marketing and Branding of HBCU students.
Students need to attend conferences like:
1. Blogging While Brown
(the premiere blogging conference for bloggers of color and culture)
Blogging While Brown
2. Florida Blogging and Technology Conference
(FLBlogCon educates and empowers bloggers by
teaching best practices for blogging)

 

 

 

 

 

Just to name two, Google other conferences like:
WordCamp, BarCamp, EdCamp

20160423_092230
There is even a Florida Writers Conference that
provides access to literary influences and thought
leaders.
Check with local libraries and even MeetUps
to see what events are coming up.

Colleges and universities across the nation are
teaching the intricate dynamics of writing and applying
writing to integrating with technology. The growth and
influence of blogging can be seen in its infusion
in Social Media platforms that are now money
makers,  business ventures based on content creation.
Social Media has a local impact on the events that
happen in communities where individual citizens are
reporters and content creators that keep neighbors
informed and engaged.

Writing influencers such as Chinua Achebe and Buchi
Emecheta have been influential in my blogging because
of the passion they have for their native Nigeria and
empowerment of education and literacy.
One of the best influences for HBCU students is to find
a blogging/writing mentor, either virtual or in person.
It is important to find writers with similar interests and
abilities to model and direct passion to create content.

My other mentors are Malcolm X because of his love
for learning, Richard Wright for intellectualism,
Earnest Gaines, James Baldwin, Carter G. Woodson
to name a few.

Reading is important because content
is based on research and background information
that will validate and carry your blog.

Buchi Emecheta
“I believe it is important to speak to your readers
in person… to enable people to have a whole
picture of me; I have to both write and speak.
I view my role as writer and also as oral communicator.”
These are strong words that can be applied to bloggers.
Engagement and communication is important.
Involvement in a community and speaking up is
important as well. HBCU students, what is your passion
to blog about to help effect positive and
transformational change?

BlackBloggersConnect.com
leading SM / Blogging site:
Social media is the thriving pulse
behind the blogosphere.

ThyBlackMan.com
http://thyblackman.com/about-us/

HBCU students
create change through intellectualism and developing
themselves as a thought leader and influencer.
Choose your words wisely and apply your passions,
you will make an impact in the world and be heard.

scsusite2011_r1_c1
I’m a proud graduate of South Carolina State College

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July 27, 2016

If You Think School Is Hard In America

If You Think School Is Hard In America
by William Jackson, M.Ed.
Edward Waters College

The process of education is an evolving process
of continuous change, modification, and adaptation.
Rigor, differentiation, literacy, comprehension,
assessments and other terms that are used in the
process of educating children from birth to higher
education and beyond. Educators and parents
can become overwhelmed and confused in this
process of education as curriculum’s change.

This blog is influenced by the recent national
discussion on the need for an educated society
and how children are influenced and encouraged
to learn in the classrooms of this nation and
the application of STEM STEAM STREAM.

I wanted to reference the education of students
globally and the educational support of parents
of color and culture nationwide in America.
Parents need to accept their responsibility for the
educational success of their children and to be
involved with the educational process especially
reading and math.
This is NOT to say parents are not involved,
this is in reference to those that make excuses
for not attending parent/teacher conferences,
eating lunch at least once in the school year with
their kids and will not return teacher phone calls
or notes for parental support with disruptive and
struggling students.

Teachers need parental support and parents
need to be actively involved in schools from Pre-K
to High School. As another school year starts thus
the fashion extravaganza will begin. Everyone
wants to look good the first week, but what of
the 175 remaining days of academic rigor and work?

This nation provides a FREE education, supported
by tax dollars. There have been educational
think-tanks, educational committees, and focus
groups that assess and monitor how students are
educated. The universal ideology is that education
is important to the economic welfare of the
people of the United States of America no
matter the color or culture. All children need to
be educated to survive.
“This country needs an educated workforce
to compete globally.” Diverse Education
http://diverseeducation.com/article/11325/

One important fact that cannot be ruled out,
eliminated or downplayed is that in this country
education is important. Nowhere else in the world is
there an educational system like the United
States of America. The foundation is based
on parents being the “First Educator” for their
children. The importance of parents is stated as:
“Parenting involves taking responsibility seriously,
taking advantage of every opportunity to enhance
children’s learning, and providing children with
challenges that contribute to growth and development.”
Parents As First Teachers, Abelardo Villarreal, Ph.D.

Parental responsibility is to teach basic
foundational skills and reinforce these with
children before they start school. As an
educator of over 20 years and Teacher of the
Year in my district, I want to share
with parents that interaction with children
and the experiences that are provided can
guide children’s growth and development.

Children should be taken to the library
to build respect in the empowerment of
reading and literacy, they will appreciate
reading when they see their parents excited
about reading.
Children taken to the museum they will
appreciate culture, diversity and historical
connections that they are part of a global
community of humanity.  Children taken
to science centers they will appreciate
science and technology, understand why
STEM and STEAM are valuable to them.

There is work that needs to be done to
educate children and it starts at home. No
matter the educational level of parents, all
parents want the best for their children, but
sometimes need guidance and help.

Part 2 Next

Resources:
Scholarships to continue education.
Ashley Hill
Twitter @prepforcollege
Host of #CollegeChat
Web http://www.collegeprepready.com/

Black Male Achievement
http://ebm.e.foundationcenter.org/c/tag/hBXj47hB8ixY9B9P$S8AAAAAANr/

GetConnectDad – @GetConnectDad – #GetConnectDAD

Parents As First Teachers
http://www.idra.org/IDRA_Newsletter/April_2005_Self_
Renewing_Schools_Reading_and_Literacy/Parents_As_First_Teachers/

July 20, 2016

Call Me Mister: A Brighter Future for Male Teachers

Call Me Mister: A Brighter Future for Male Teachers
by William Jackson, M.Ed.
Edward Waters College
Call Me Mister Instructor and Advisor
“Teamwork Makes The Dream Work!!”

Video via
William Jackson
william.jackson@ewc.edu

If the embed does not work
here is the link to the video.
Call Me Mister
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fglK5KUyMwM

20160622_204622

July 4, 2016

How Do You Change African American Communities Part II

How Do You Change African American Communities Part II
The connections to change a community…………

1. African Americans must build psychological
weapons to fight tyranny. Physical weapons do
not allow for systemic growth and improvement
through generations.

2. African Americans must build schools in
their communities no matter who attends them.
African Americans must volunteer like whites and
Asians do, if your not employed put your time to
good use and do positive things in the
community and volunteering in the schools.

3. African Americans must remember that President
Obama is the President of the United States of
America and African Americans are not the only
ones that put him in office. They need to colloborate
with others to make changes.

4. African Americans need to recognize their
intellectuals along with their athletes and
entertainers. Intellectual students (the Blerds,
Nerds, and Geeks) will make changes that influence
economics, commerce and involved in STEAM.

5. African Americans must not be content with
just owning things. They must work to build
businesses, they must support their innovators
and their creators in their children.

6. African Americans must believe in equal
educational value for both girls and boys.
More women are starting businesses, hiring from
their neighborhoods and providing employment
opportunities.

teach children

7. African Americans must honor and seek advise
from their elders as they did decades ago.
To face economic and societal challenges with
plans of community collaboration,
development, working with law enforcement
and building employment skills.

8. African Americans must value community
dialogues that includes all religious beliefs
and lifestyles. The scope is to improve their
communities and unify. Colorism and inner
racism must stop.

9. African Americans must not allow mediocrity
from their children. They must have high and
realistic expectations from their children
in education and volunteering in the community.

10. African Americans must hold their city
council members accountable, to be seen and
active in the communities they serve. They
should not be seen just for media shots and
sound bytes. They should be seen more during
non re-election years letting their works
speak for them when elections do come around.

11. African Americans must be involved, active,
engaged in their communities, schools and
churches. African Americans must attend PTA
meetings, SAC -school advisory council meetings,
school board meetings and even community
law enforcement meetings.

12. African Americans should not allow anyone
to keep them from learning and growing
academically. Churches should be offering
tutoring services in reading, math and science.

13.African Americans must read diverse
literature especially from other African
Americans and Africans. There should be
community book talks, political discussions
and STEAM seminars for kids and teens.

16. African American children should focus on
what they can do, not what they cannot do.
Parents need to embrace their children’s
abilities, talents, skills and dreams and guide
them to success.

17. African American fathers should show love
to their sons and spend time with their children.
They need to be building relationships and
developing compassion, empathy, sincerity,
and humility.

18. African American parents must choose to
sacrifice for their kids and spend monies on
books, literature and other learning
opportunities.

19. African Americans must change the culture
of fear in their communities. There needs to
be a focus on unity and equality within their
own communities.

20. African Americans need to leverage their
talented ones, to be able to write community
grants to provide educational chances and
not keep all resources to themselves.

21. African American religious centers
should combine for the benefit of their
communities not just their individual
churches.

“The choices of today will affect the
opportunities of tomorrow.”
William Jackson

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