My Quest To Teach

February 20, 2018

Content Creators: Establish Expectations for WordCamps in 2018

Never Apologize for Being Dope
Content Creators: Establish Expectations for WordCamps in 2018

by William Jackson and Aida Correa
@wmjackson @latinapheonix
As content creators grow the need for training is increasing,
WordCamp conferences meet and many times exceed the
needs of  beginners, intermediate and veteran bloggers,
micro-bloggers, Podcasters and VBloggers.
As a speaker and participant of WordCamp conferences
a few hints before registering for any WordCamp.
You should already have certain expectations for your learning.
Having attended and spoken at several WordCamp events in
2017 the benefits are lasting and the friendships a lifetime.
The potential for continued collaborations are endless and
potentially life changing. There are different expectations
for each person if speaking or attending, there needs to
be an established plan that fits individual needs based on
the session or track.
Decide what your goals are as a content creator and how
you mesh or combine your plan to learn. The integration
of technology that can aid your business and personal
growth, build a Brand and Market yourself.
There is more to gaining readers, viewers and engagement
than a flashy web site, dazzling coding and eye stunning
photos, it takes planning and engagement.
How you’re marketing your Brand and integrating
content as an engaging and interactive element makes
a difference in achieving the goals you have set.
Attending WordCamp assists in finding
out what products, services and resources can benefit
you and your customers.
This includes make sure you have plenty of business
cards, your marketing “pitch” is practiced and your
appearance matches your Brand.
Building a Brand creates future opportunities for
investments and expansion outside of normal business
lines. The benefit resulting from investing in attending
WordCamp may take time and work,
networking and building relationships.
As a content creator you represent your business so
consider the potential of building business relationships.
Never judge a person by attire, color or culture, gain
insight on how engaging during conversation and
interaction.
Events like WordCamp / KidCamp and others like
Bar Camp, EdCamp for educators provide
opportunities to expose youth and teens to
applying social skills and learning business skills
that are important in commerce, finance and
knowledge based careers.
KidCamp in WordCamp are growing because
the future is with children and teens they
too have a stake in building their Brand and
their content. They are establishing businesses
and building awareness for their contributions.
Youth are learning how important building
relationships in business are and the
connections to future careers.
Intellectual design is key because knowledge
based careers are expanding. Through KidCamp
events youth are building self-confidence,
self-awareness, self-determination and
self-respect. There is no room for fear and
doubt because if  knowledge is lacking youth
and teens are accessing YouTube
to educate and enlighten themselves.
Today’s WordCamp means youth and teens
should have business cards to understand the
experience of participation, the excitement of
being present and seen as a contributor and
a future speaker.
Technology contains and embraces diversity so
youth and teens also must model that. WordCamp
venues contain great potential to be an awesome
experience. To build life-long and generational
intellectual learners. Access to wealth resources,
intellectual design, community activism through
digital community engagement.
Building entrepreneurial vision that allows the
embracing of adaptation, change and growth.
WordCamp is unique, engaging, interactive and
empowering.

William Jackson, Blogger Thought Leader

How To Be Dope On Social Media:
WordPress TV – https://wordpress.tv/speakers/william-jackson/
Resources:
WordCamp Jacksonville, Florida – https://2018.jacksonville.wordcamp.org
WordCamp Atlanta, Georgia – https://2018.atlanta.wordcamp.org
WordCamp Greenville, South Carolina – https://2018.greenville.wordcamp.org
WordCamp Miami – https://2018.miami.wordcamp.org/
WordCamp Central 2018 – https://central.wordcamp.org/schedule/
Your complete listing nationally and globally.
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January 31, 2018

The Book Deserts of Underserved Communities

20180106_143559
The Book Deserts of Underserved Communities

by William Jackson and Aida Correa
@wmjackson and @latinapheonix

There are deserts that span vast distances around the world.
They lack the resources to support the diversity of life seen in
places that have sufficient environmental conditions that allow
for growth of foliage allowing animals to live, survive and thrive.

The definition of a desert by Wikipedia is:
“A desert is a barren area of landscape where little precipitation
occurs and consequently living conditions are hostile for plant
and animal life.” The application of this definition in many ways
can be applied to under-served communities across this nation
that suffer from lack of educational
materials promoting reading.

Even though there are books in schools, libraries and community
centers conditions may not be motivating for children in
under-served communities.
Looking at the Twitter tags #BookDeserts #BookDesert
#ReadingDeserts there is a serious discussion promoting literacy
in communities. When there are children that love to read it can
be challenging to find materials that excite them and their passion
to learn about the areas they love.

Stated by Derrick Young (Mahogany Books in Washington, D.C.)
about book deserts, “A book desert isn’t a community-created
situation.”
Derek Young states, “It’s because other people have decided not
to invest into these communities. It’s not because these
communities aren’t readers.”

As an educator and two children attending universities I
understand that education is an investment that has long term
applications, people living in distressed areas are on survival
mode and not seeing long term events because they are surviving
from day to day. Aida a mother and grandmother understands
the value and importance of reading. She taught her children
that reading is a foundation to educational success.

As an inner city Title 1 teacher over 20 years I have seen students
attention directed to just living, not worrying about where the
next book will be coming from.
So books may not be available to inspire reading. Studies in 2015
and 2016 have shown that book deserts exist when there is a rise
in income segregation, lack of infrastructure investment or
financial stability is affected by job loss, incarceration and even
when a school receives a failing grade on state assessments
and funds are cut.

Negatively impacting a family’s and community’s capability to
provide reading material. The focus changes and diminishes the
chances of academic success. The impact on adults is big as well,
children do not see their parents reading the newspaper or
books so they do not have role models or engagement to talk
about the news and current events.

Even neighborhood libraries face challenges because their
materials maybe old, outdated and not culturally relevant.
If a child does not see themselves in a book they may not
want to read it if there is no previous exposure.
Jacksonville Public Libraries often work within communities
to provide resources and materials that broaden the vision
of children and create a welcoming environment for Black,
Latina, White, Asian, etc. There are still some parents that do
not access the resources because of their lack
of reading skills or past experiences.

In Jacksonville, Florida there are book stores “Chamblin”
that have books bursting out of the walls to be purchased
and can even be returned in exchange at a lower cost for
other books. Teachers can even have accounts setup for
their classrooms so students can purchase books and the
teacher can pay for all or part of the book.

In this digital age where information sharing, collaboration
and knowledge based application is important. Reading
is an essential skill that transcends generations, genders,
lifestyles and cultures. Communities of color
sometimes lack the educational investments necessary to
inspire children, youth, teens and young adults to read,
but parents do guide their children to educational success
and movement, parents are the first role models by
modeling.

Too often the societal perception and even the media has
the idea that people in challenged or poor neighborhoods
don’t care about the achievement of their children. This is
further from the truth, parents in under-served
neighborhoods want the best for their children, because
of circumstances in finances, educational lacking, and other
social issues do not have the means to provide proper and
lasting resources.

Book stores like “Chamblin” and Jacksonville Public Libraries
fill the gap in book deserts so long as there is proper investment
and a vision for growth and success to meet the needs of
diverse communities.

Parents make 2018 the year for engagement with your
children to get them to enjoy reading. Make it a part of your
and their life every day…
Over 200 Books for and about People of Color and Culture
Video created by William Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
https://youtu.be/Uo6UDfrJgqk

Resources:
Twitter: #bookdeserts #bookdesert
Book Deserts
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/book-deserts-leave-low-income-neighborhoods-thirsty-reading-material-n833356
Chamblin Book Store – http://chamblinbookmine.com/default.aspx
Facebook for Chamblin Book Store
https://www.facebook.com/chamblinbookmine/
Jacksonville Public Library Twitter – https://twitter.com/jaxlibray
Jacksonville Public Library Online – http://www.jacksonvillelibrary.com
Friends of the Jacksonville Public Library – http://fjpl.info
San Marco Bookstore
@SanMarcoBooks – Twitter
Jacksonville, FL
http://sanmarcobookstore.com

November 17, 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness
William Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
Sponsor of WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017
The recent WordCamp Nairobi and other tech venues
that are hosting technology conferences, workshops,
meetups and supporting entrepreneurs and I-trepreneurs
are growing in Africa. Tech is becoming common place.
Being dope on Social Media is not a cultural thing, it is
the ability to be comfortable in your digital skin as a
content creator, digital creator, innovator, graphic artist
or even a dope web developer. Everyone has a dope
side to them, it just takes time to discover it and
importantly apply that dopeness to a positive online
experience.
It means that it is ok to have fun on the web and to
integrate yourself into your product or service even on
a digital level. Too many people lose the excitement of
creating content that will be read, viewed, studied,
listened to and watched. Audiences change as access
and platforms change, so why not be Dope and Lit,
providing something that brings people to you and
influence community activist and activism?
SEO even in Africa – Search Engine Optimization is not
always the ticket, WOM or Word of Mouth is still important
and should always be a viable strategy to build followers.
Search Engine Optimization is tech based, but
technology cannot always bring readers. Building
relationships and collaborations are the keys.
Africans are expanding their presence and their ability
to create dynamic digital content.
As a parent, educator, blogger, mentor, community
activist and STEAM Advocate and proud sponsor for
WordCamp Nairobi, Kenya here are my 21 Reasons
African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

Nairobi Conference
1. To attract diverse readers and viewers. Being diversified
in your audience is a plus because people connect with
what they like, how it relates to their needs and relevance.
2. Most viewers will be women and they love dope content.
Try not to be boring or repetitive.
3. If you want a broad spectrum of followers dope up your
blog with relevant content and graphics that match your
audience. Diversity is Dope
4. International markets look to promote Dope and Lit
content. They always look for awesome people.
5. If you’re looking to monetize your site and content
expand your dopeness to new markets that embraces
diversity and engagement.
6. Hire dope speakers like myself to talk on your Podcasts.
If you’re having a workshop or conference be very selective
because content has to be dope and exciting.
7. Take plenty of dope photos and videos with dope and lit
people. Use your Instagram and Twitter sites to share and
expand your reach.
8. Speak at WordCamps, BarCamps, EdCamps and other
tech conferences.
9. Always have your business cards available, make sure
there is a dope photo of yourself and have your “elevator
pitch” ready.
10. Hire a dope graphic artist to create your dope logo.
11. Be a sponsor and promoter of community events like
WordCamp as you grow.
12. Join the Chamber of Commerce and other dope
organizations that are invested in the community and city.
13. Be a speaker on talk shows to share your knowledge.
14. Start your own Podcast with guests and be fancy
with your title.
15. See where you can help your church or ministry with their
connectivity.
16. Take a Social Media class yourself.
17. Offer Social Media classes with certificates when completed.
18. Keep your profiles current, relevant and oozzing with dopeness.
19. Take a dope vacation from time to time to encourage
inspiration locally, nationally and internationally.
20. Embrace diversity in your vision and expression.
21. Network – Network – Network
“How To Be Dope On Social Media 2017”
William Jackson Speaking at
WordCamp Wilmington, North Carolina
https://youtu.be/GQup1mEMX-I

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