My Quest To Teach

February 20, 2017

What’s In TEDTALKS, TEDx and TIGERTALKS

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What’s In TEDTALKS, TEDx and TIGERTALKS
William Jackson, parent, educator, blogger
#MyQuestToTeach @wmjackson

Since the inception of the TEDTALKS and the
budding TEDx and even the birthing of TIGER TALKS
with Edward Waters College, there have been dynamic,
inspiring, funny, intellectual and emotional discussions
about every aspect of human life. The sharing of stories
has created an intellectual feeding frenzy of information,
facts, statistics, data, ideas and opinions that are shared.

The TEDxFSCJ held in Jacksonville, Florida is a
wonderful example of the spirit of storytelling and
exchange of information. The continuous process
that has been conducted since human existence of
sharing information through oral communication
or “storytelling.” FSCJ TEDx is an awesome example
of community collaboration and the celebration of
diversity that makes Jacksonville and rising global
contributor.

There is no topic that is taboo (to the best of my
understanding), the exchanges are respectful and
sprinkled with just enough gusto, spunk to sassiness
and classiness to keep those in attendance guessing
what direction the speaker will go in and intrigued
as the dialogue changes with the emotional
attachments to the personal stories being told.

The infusion of culture, gender, lifestyle, religious
and community connections helps in the sharing of
knowledge in a relational way that people connect
and bond.

The speakers open their hearts, their minds and
even their essence of spiritual substance in an
attempt not to change minds, but to build a
relationship that creates a possible change in
behaviors and actions to improve the human
exchanges that sometimes makes us wonder
how we can all be human beings and treat each
other with the disrespect and violence that we
see in news media with wars, discrimination,
racism, and bias. The other side can be seen the
compassion, love, respect, trust and overcoming
of misconceptions that keep people separated.

We question where is our compassion, empathy,
contentedness and respect for cultural understanding,
tolerance and acceptance. This country can be
described as a “salad” of cultural diversity, a “gumbo”
of simmered and spiced flavors of human complexity
and simplicity. TEDx TEDTALKS and TIGER TALKS
allows for communication and encourages open
mindedness.

TEDxFSCJ  can be found at http://www.tedxfscj.com/
and the Team can be found here. http://www.tedxfscj.com/team/

HBCU’s like Edward Waters College are involving their
students in “talks” similar to TEDx expose their students
to  formal speaking opportunities that prepare them for
careers where they will have to speak and prepare
them for opportunities of dialogue and intellectual
sharing and collaboration.

Each semester Professor Jackson an accomplished
speaker, national and international blogger and
instructor at Edward Waters College requires
his students to speak about what they are passionate
about, what they care about and their experiences as
a project in the Educational and Social Media class.
As stated by Professor Jackson, “every Tiger has a story
that needs to be told.” Emma Kent of Library Services
provides her expertise as a master librarian and
researcher in helping to prepare the students for each
discussion. “Team work makes the dream word.”

TIGER TALKS Experience developed by William Jackson,
guides EWC students to improve their writing through
blogging on WordPress platform and encourages students
to attend conferences, even paying for their travel.
HBCU students sometimes lack the professional
experiences so any assistance financial,
advice and mentoring is appreciated.

Exposure and Application allow HBCU students to
build skills to help them to be competitive in a global
economy and builds positive digital footprints when
incorporating technology.
Community invitations are extended to join TEDxFSCJ
and the Tiger Talks Experiences at each school are
shared on their web sites.
Wonderful collaborations by FSCJ and Edward Waters
College have allowed students from EWC and even
DCPS – Duval County Public Schools to participate.
Sharing their experiences and talents in education
and technology.
Resources:
Follow TED on Twitter at http://twitter.com/TEDTalks
or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/TED
Educational Technology at Edward Waters College
http://ewceducationaltechnology.wordpress.com/

 

February 6, 2017

My Hidden Figures Reflection

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Taylor and students from Venetia Elementary and Lee High School

My Hidden Figures Reflection
By: Breyonna Fox,
Blogging Intern with My Quest To Teach
Jacksonville, Florida
My first thought when I finished watching Hidden
Figures was, “Wow, they actually did all of those
things, like they accomplished their goals.” I thought
this was very inspirational, because back then it was
very hard for other races besides Caucasians, to do
the things they wanted and love. In the movie there
is a part when Mary Jackson’s husband even doubts
her accomplishing her dreams, showing how
un-motivated people were and how many dreams
were simply crushed and forgotten.

Then there was Dorothy Vaughn who wanted to be
a supervisor for her group of women who are highly
skilled with computers. She wanted to move on with
her dreams when she realized Katherine and Mary
was moving up with theirs. NASA wouldn’t make
her a supervisor though, she worked hard and even
acted like a supervisor to her group of woman. Then
one day she got a huge offer, but she would only do
it if her girls were with her as well. So they allowed it.
She finally became a supervisor. She is the first
African American woman to supervise a staff
at the West Area Computers Division. Another part
in the movie shows when she took her sons to the
library to get some books to help her out with work,
they ended up getting kicked out, just because
Dorothy needed the book, but the library was whites’
only.

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It was upsetting to see how she couldn’t check
out the book and then the security guard pushed
her sons out as well. Then when she got on the
bus she still had the book on her and when her
sons asked why and she said she pays taxes
and those taxes help the library out. I know
Dorothy is a very witty and strong person. She
stayed determined in what she believed in and
knew she could accomplish her goals, she didn’t
leave her girls and moved them up with her.

Mary Jackson, wanted to become an engineer,
in the beginning she had doubts about it. She
was talking about it with her co-worker and she
said how impossible it felt, her co-workers told
her she could do it, because they were already
doing the impossible. I thought about what she
said and how she had hope that Mary could
accomplish her goals. It showed me even when
things feel impossible, they aren’t. She even
went to court to fight for what she wanted and
got night classes at University, an all-white
school! That was amazing. I really loved that part,
because that filled so much hope in Mary and
made her believe more in herself that she could
accomplish a lot more things after that, Mary
Jackson became the first female African
American NASA engineer. Mary is a sassy, brave
and determined for what she fights for.
Last, but not least was Katherine Goble,
she was strongly skilled in mathematics and
had an analytical mind. She got a new assignment
by Al Harrison, so she had to move to a new
part of the company.

When she was getting escorted, the woman told her,
“you will be the first black person here. Don’t make
me regret choosing you. Most people only last a few
days, so don’t get used to it.” Then when Katherine
entered everyone stared at her. Her co-workers were
rude towards her as well. She went to grab some
coffee and everyone was staring at her. She
immediately felt uncomfortable and sat down and
sipped her coffee slowly. After that incident they
got a second coffee maker and it said “colored”,
she went to use it, it was empty, sending a message.

This showed me how even though Katherine
accomplished her goals, there will always be people
trying to bring her down. Then she got upset and
explained to Harrison how rude everyone was acting
towards her and how she never got pearls and how
no one wants to use the same coffee maker as her,
since earlier she was always in the bathroom and he
would ask where she went. Then the next day he
tore down the “whites only” bathroom and the
“colored” signs and he said, “no whites or colored,
we’re all the same here.” That showed me how
Al Harrison really cared about Katherine as an
employee and he didn’t care about skin color.

Then when Katherine got engaged, her co-workers
got her a pearl necklace, which was Harrison’s ideas
too, which she wore to her wedding. Then later on in
the movie, when John Glenn was going to orbit
around earth, he said he only trusted Katherine with
her calculations and with his safety, he knew she
was brilliant and he only trusted her not the computer
machine. He was right too, he had trouble up in space,
but he got back safe.

Katherine played a huge roll in John Glenn’s journey
and Apollo space program landing a man on the moon.
In 2015, Katherine received National Medal of Freedom
from President Obama.

breyonna-fox
Breyonna Fox, blogger

This movie showed me that anything you set your mind
to you can accomplish. You just have to stay determined
and full of courage. This movie is very inspiring and
does prove to other women and girls they can do things
even when they feel it’s out of their reach.
Edited by Prof. William Jackson  #MyQuestToTeach

Resources dedicated to women
TEDxFSCJ Salon: Lift as We Climb:
Women Race and Politics
Thursday, February 16, 2017
6:00pm – 8:00pm
FSCJ – Downton Campus
Auditorium A-1068
http://www.tedxfscj.com/events/

Real Talk Real Change
We Are Women Hear Us More..
Thursday, February 16, 2017
6:00pm – 8:00pm
Riverside North – 2711 Edison Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida
rtrc20viii20-20fb20cover20-20320sponsors_0

January 27, 2017

What’s Next for Hidden Figures In The Future

What’s Next for Hidden Figures In  The Future
by William Jackson

taylor-and-mom

Congratulations to Latanya Richardson and her daughter
Taylor Richardson for the success of showing Hidden
Figures in Jacksonville, Florida to over 200 girls.
The awesome story of how African American women
helped NASA to put astronauts into space and bring
them back to earth.
Girls and women from around Jacksonville, Florida
attended representing groups and schools from
around the city. As a teacher I had the honor to bring
several students from Venetia Elementary School a
Medical Magnet STEM that teaches grade K to 5th 
and
a Lee High School student. My only regret is
that I could not bring more.

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The emotional and psychological inspiration of
this movie demands to ask what is next to keep
the seriousness and the historical value of this
movie moving forward. STEM and STEAM that
are being applied in the educational cultures of
schools is seen as not only career necessary, but
has scientific, business and commerce influences
in this country and on a global scale.
The movie brilliantly showed not just the struggles
of women in the NASA Space Program, but showed
the value and application of their education.
The reason why educational degrees are important,
the value of visiting the library to learn new things
and applying them to real world situations, and the
personal responsibility to prepare for the future.

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There were many scenes where the women were called
“computers” as their analytical abilities where recognized,
but only later were they respected after showing and
demanding equality through leadership opportunities and
promotions that were withheld only because of their color.
Working with many types of math and integrating
mathematical equations that sometimes had to be created.
This shows that girls and women have the skill sets and
analytical abilities to function in complex and STEAM
areas that demand creativity and innovation.

Hidden Figures addressed several civil rights issues in the
areas of political and educational equality that in some cases
are still being addressed for Black
s, Hispanics and others of
color,
the struggle still continues and there
have been many successes.

group-picture

Girls and women will take away many lessons from the
movie and see how history was changed not just by
protests, by going to school to earn advanced degrees,
learning the laws of the nation, how to speak properly
without using profanity, the importance of family unity
and support and setting goals that everyone works towards.

Another important key is to carry or act like there is
self-pride, cultural respect and intelligence.
 A key lesson
shared is that children  
learned early that education is
the ticket to a better life even when there are
struggles
and
challenges to be overcome.

Even seeing the implementation of “new” technologies
at the time when early computers where not as easy to
use, but there was continued learning in programming
languages that demanded studying and forward thinking.
The movement to gaining educational parity and equality
is a great value for boys and girls of color, this movie is
worth seeing again and applied to the learning initiatives
in all schools to allow students to see the why they
need to be serious about their education and the vision
for their dreams of success.

ibm

Seeing the new IBM computers being used, but it
took a woman to learn the programming language to
make it work sends a message that women are as smart
and intelligent as men, even if those men are Black
or white.
There are no barriers than can stop girls and women
from gaining l
eadership skill-sets and applying the
intelligence to make positive and historical changes.
Parents, mothers, fathers, and grandparents if you
have not seen Hidden Figures take your children and
other children if possible to see this movie that not
only shows the historical application of education
and cultural  pride and respect, that gender is not
a liability
, color is not a curse, there is a blending of
historical successes and  global influence.

movie-relaxing

Hidden Figures opens the mind’s eye that anything is
possible, t
hat dreams can be achieved, and intelligence
is Dope and Lit.
What is next is up to parents, schools, churches and
communities to support children, youth and teens.
Time will tell, graduations rates from high school
and college will tell and the growing number of girls
and boys of co
lor in  STEM careers will tell.

 

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