My Quest To Teach

March 6, 2017

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself

 

 

 

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself
by Pro. William Jackson
Educational Technology and Social Media
Edward Waters College @wmjackson

HBCU students in the 21st century cannot wait to market themselves
in a world of global commerce, digital Branding, intellectual sharing
and the vast Social Media sites that are building to get the word out
there about the talents, abilities and skills that HBCU students possess.

HBCU students still struggle and have faced more challenges in the past
8 years as HBCU institutions struggle to remain relevant, real and respiratory.
Even with the promises coming by the Trump administration there will
be strings attached, policies to follow, procedures to implement and even
expectations that need to be achieved.  This is not a handout, I hope it is
a help up for these historic institutions and if any money is provided
it is not mismanaged, lost in ill-advised policies nor “misplaced.”

Internal struggles have been a challenge at HBCUs either through faculty
stability, administration interaction with faculty and students or the
changes in generations of priorities. The retention and graduation of
students especially males is a serious issue that needs to be addressed.

The debate about the relevancy of HBCUs continues, data shows that a
high percentage of Black educators that are successful and work in the
most challenging schools graduate from HBCUs and continue on to
earn their advanced degrees. HBCU students are involved in STEM
careers even before STEM and STEAM where aligned with
educational initiatives.

As a graduate of an HBCU South Carolina State University ’85 and an
instructor at Edward Waters College,  the oldest HBCU in Florida, the
struggle is real and in many cases is overcome with each victory of students
graduating and becoming gainfully employed.

Teaching Educational Technology and Social Media the challenge is
teaching students how to compete for jobs before graduation, how to
Brand, then Market to a world of global competition and even tougher
globalization. This blog is about why HBCU students should market
themselves before graduation, usually starting in their junior year to
network with and collaborate with the “right folks.” Instilling in students
that if you want to be an educator, hangout with educators, if you want
to be a lawyer network with attorneys, if you want to even be a gamer
then learn from, compete with and against, and importantly network
with other gamers.

The most dangerous thing that keeps HBCU students from gaining their
dreams and aspirations is being afraid to network, speak with, talk to and
exposed to the diversity that world has to offer. Talking to my students I
share that you will not lose whatever “Blackness” you have if you have a
diversity of friends, associates, networking groups that can empower,
motivate, engage and collaborate with.

These suggestions are designed to help
HBCU students get out of their mental
boxes and to be less introverted and
race conscious
of fear and self-imposed apprehension.

Suggestions to motivate and encourage
for students and educators:

1. Learn how to market yourself before you
search for jobs, before you graduate, either
at the start or before your junior year of
higher education, vocational school or even
the transition from military service to civilian life.
2. Marketing shows your worth, talents, abilities,
work ethic, leadership abilities, being able to
function in diverse environments, acceptance
and tolerance of diversity.
Learn what marketing is….
3. The ability to adapt to the diversity of cultures, technology, responsibility
and accountability for success and failures needs to be learned. That does
not mean babying students it means teaching students how to adapt their
biases, stereotypes that they may have and how to professionally deal with
potential situations and circumstances.
4. HBCU students must always see themselves as investments.
The more you grow and improve the better investment you are to yourself
and future employers.
5. Don’t wait until your senior  year to rush to create a dope or lit resume,
start the first year and build by creating a living document of accomplishments,
volunteerism, learning, leadership, community activism and collaboration.

As a professor in higher education and as a elementary teacher it hurts my
spirit when students state “why do I have to do that”, I don’t wanna be
bothered with those people.” My response is, “do the right people know you
in the career you want or just those that do not want to see you grow beyond
them?”

6. Show yourself as well rounded; the combination of academics, job-training,
extra-curricular activities, volunteerism, all need to show your contribution to
things bigger than you are. Are you a part of something bigger than you?
7. Look at the world globally not just locally. Jacksonville, Florida is the largest
city in the USA by land mass. Students are encouraged in my class to have a
global perspective of the world. The smallest global event in their major can
have major implications on employment and involved in global markets.
8. Believe that your major course of study will have national and
potentially international influence as  you grow and take on more responsibility.
The road to leadership is driven not by money, but by willing to work hard to
make a difference in the world.
9. Learn to be familiar with foreign languages.  Dedicate yourself that you will
learn a new language especially one where you may have to use when traveling.
HBCU students can be heard talking that someday I want to, I might, maybe if.
They want to travel overseas, they do not take the time to plan, execute the plan
or even save to meet the plan. You have to start with a plan!!!
10. HBCU students network with cultural groups and participate in community
events like festivals and networking socials. Never assume that there is already
someone at an event that knows what you know. You have a wealth of inform-
ation that no one else knows.
11. It is important for HBCU students to learn how to integrate Social Media
tools and platforms beyond joking with their friends, booty calls, partying,
clubbing and acting a fool. This multi-functional, diversely dynamic platforms
can allow for communication with employers around the world. These
platforms can help start a career or end a career before it gets started.
12. Being technology savvy is important and just as importantly is how to
apply that knowledge. Use your knowledge to be involved in community
initiatives that build communities, that bring people together and open doors
for collaboration.
13. Have a reliable list of resources to help you grow.
The library services at Edward Waters College has one of the best resources
in its library staff. Emma Kent is a knowledgeable and dedicated professional
that embraces technology. Accentuating the services the library at Edward
Waters College offers. Too many students at HBCUs do not take the time
to get to know their library professionals that have a wealth of information
waiting to share and becoming friends with them. One of the best moves
for me was to be friends with the librarians, custodial staff, be nice to
the cafeteria man and women and secretaries. They became my “extra”
parents with prayers, advice and even extra food on my meal trays!!
14. HBCU students must adapt their thinking as they matriculate through the
years. Their ideas, opinions, skills, networks must change. This change should
be seen in their attire, their speech and self-confidence. Being a lifelong
learner brings benefits that will be seen in the future not just in the present.
15. Applying to both males and females, your visual personality is just as
important as your e-personality and e-reputation. Make the conscious effort
to protect yourself in the direction of your career goals and dreams.
16. During your growth take advantage of tutoring and learning outside of
academics. Attend tutoring for interview skills, cultural understanding, career
counseling, and even role playing directed at your career interests.
The more prepared you are the better prepared you are.
Obtain a mentor, someone that has life experiences, and sees your potential
that you do not. Someone that sees you as an investment to a better
future and learn from them.

February 1, 2017

2017 Reflections for Technological Growth for Parents

 

 

 

 

2017 Reflections for
Technological Growth for Parents
William Jackson, M.Ed. #MyQuestToTeach
@wmjackson

As 2017 continues so does the continued infusion, integration,
and invasion of technical tools, social platforms, interactive
games and devices. People are building machines, robots
and other mechanism that actually do something and the think.
Apps are being developed, it is becoming difficult to decide the
benefits and needs to connect with, chat with, associate with
and involve those that do not have a physical connection in
day to day lives.

People connected by Social Networks may not have the same
value and moral structure as those who have made a physical
connection. Care still needs to be a priority because of the ease
of technical deceptions, distribution of misinformation and deceit.

Terrorist group’s mode for recruitment are online networks that
target youth, teens and young adults to radicalize thinking.
The growth in false news reports is another challenge, social
engagement is important to hash-out truth and lies. 2017 seeks
to be another transformative year of expansion of technological
surprise and wonder but education is the key to being ingaged
and involved.

 

 

 

 

The global access to information
creates stresses that contribute
to psychological, physical and
even emotional changes in many
people. These suggestions are for parents globally that may be
struggling with handling the invasion of technology in the home,
in the community and in schools.

 

 

 

 
1. Parents monitor your child’s online
activities, explain behavior
expectations for actions while online.
a. Parents should be aware of where
their children are going
online and who they are engaging with.
b. Children’s psychological safety is just as important as their
physical safety, so if threatened online children, youth and
teens should notify parents and guardians.
c. Have conversations about favorite sites, online friends,
what social media platforms are being using.
d. Are children using video to share information, are they
using Google maps to tell their friends where they live?
These are questions internationally parents need the answers
too from their children.
2. Parents, “Know safety, No injury. No safety, Know injury”
a. Parents should be involved in determining how much tech
is being used by their children in their homes and in the
community.
b. Parents need to work with schools to help set expectations
and maybe limits in using technology. Social interaction is
still important.
3. Parents help build positive relationships for online activities.
This respect decreases bullying, cyberbullying, cyberstalking
and sexting.
4. Parents must model good online behaviors.
a. If your child sees you acting certain ways they will do the same.
b. Your children are influenced by peer pressure and your role
modeling as a parent.
c. The Internet can be a fun place, but there are dangers.
5. Parents set a time limit for your child being online.
a. More emphasis on reading and other activities that challenge
thinking and encourage social engagement.
b. Reasoning and higher order thinking skills are important skills
to learn by reading and engagement.
c. Internationally youth have great potential to influence the future
of their nation and the world.
6. Parents’ don’t be naïve about the power of Social Media platforms.
a. Sometimes you have to Google and Hashtag to get information.
7. Parents teach your children to know how advertisers work.
a. Not to click ads that say free games, candy, toys, etc.
b. Do not give out addresses and personal information.
8. Parents’ ask your children to teach you something new online.
a. Parents test your child’s intelligence and intellect with technology
by doing online journeys around the world.
9. Parents Google your children, hashtag your children, in Google,
Twitter, Facebook YouTube and other sites.
a. Use their First Name Last Name + City, State, Nation

 

 

 

 

 

10. Parents teach your
children not to put personal
information online.
a. Identity theft is a major problem
in this digital age and terrorists
are working hard to involve youth,
teens and young adults to
be used as weapons and propaganda tools.
11. Parents check parental controls in your browser and learn how to
check your browsers history to see where the kids and teens have
gone online.
12. Parents, if your children play online games monitor the language
and conversations.
13. Each Social Media site has an age restriction, parents talk to
your children about Facebook, SnapChat and others, whatever
your children are involved in.
14. Parents be friends with your kids until they are 16 at least.
a. Don’t stalk them, but monitor behaviors and actions online.
15. Parents the online experience should help to build social skills
and build cultural awareness.
a. Education is influenced, must be guided by parents and
educators working together.
16. “Treat others as you would like to be treated.”
a. The Internet is a global platform, a broad community that
represents the world, there is good and bad.
17. Parents learn new terms so you can understand your child’s
conversations.
a. slang and street language have their places
b. understand “code switching”
18. Parents plan to attend workshops, seminars, and conferences.
a. Build your knowledge, networking and entrepreneurial skills
19. Parents build your home around learning and growth resources.
20. Implement, Integrate, Initiate, technology to your comfort levels.
a. develop a plan of how and where you will use tech at home
for the betterment and empowerment of children.

January 27, 2017

What’s Next for Hidden Figures In The Future

What’s Next for Hidden Figures In  The Future
by William Jackson

taylor-and-mom

Congratulations to Latanya Richardson and her daughter
Taylor Richardson for the success of showing Hidden
Figures in Jacksonville, Florida to over 200 girls.
The awesome story of how African American women
helped NASA to put astronauts into space and bring
them back to earth.
Girls and women from around Jacksonville, Florida
attended representing groups and schools from
around the city. As a teacher I had the honor to bring
several students from Venetia Elementary School a
Medical Magnet STEM that teaches grade K to 5th 
and
a Lee High School student. My only regret is
that I could not bring more.

fb_img_1445084296495

The emotional and psychological inspiration of
this movie demands to ask what is next to keep
the seriousness and the historical value of this
movie moving forward. STEM and STEAM that
are being applied in the educational cultures of
schools is seen as not only career necessary, but
has scientific, business and commerce influences
in this country and on a global scale.
The movie brilliantly showed not just the struggles
of women in the NASA Space Program, but showed
the value and application of their education.
The reason why educational degrees are important,
the value of visiting the library to learn new things
and applying them to real world situations, and the
personal responsibility to prepare for the future.

book-hf

There were many scenes where the women were called
“computers” as their analytical abilities where recognized,
but only later were they respected after showing and
demanding equality through leadership opportunities and
promotions that were withheld only because of their color.
Working with many types of math and integrating
mathematical equations that sometimes had to be created.
This shows that girls and women have the skill sets and
analytical abilities to function in complex and STEAM
areas that demand creativity and innovation.

Hidden Figures addressed several civil rights issues in the
areas of political and educational equality that in some cases
are still being addressed for Black
s, Hispanics and others of
color,
the struggle still continues and there
have been many successes.

group-picture

Girls and women will take away many lessons from the
movie and see how history was changed not just by
protests, by going to school to earn advanced degrees,
learning the laws of the nation, how to speak properly
without using profanity, the importance of family unity
and support and setting goals that everyone works towards.

Another important key is to carry or act like there is
self-pride, cultural respect and intelligence.
 A key lesson
shared is that children  
learned early that education is
the ticket to a better life even when there are
struggles
and
challenges to be overcome.

Even seeing the implementation of “new” technologies
at the time when early computers where not as easy to
use, but there was continued learning in programming
languages that demanded studying and forward thinking.
The movement to gaining educational parity and equality
is a great value for boys and girls of color, this movie is
worth seeing again and applied to the learning initiatives
in all schools to allow students to see the why they
need to be serious about their education and the vision
for their dreams of success.

ibm

Seeing the new IBM computers being used, but it
took a woman to learn the programming language to
make it work sends a message that women are as smart
and intelligent as men, even if those men are Black
or white.
There are no barriers than can stop girls and women
from gaining l
eadership skill-sets and applying the
intelligence to make positive and historical changes.
Parents, mothers, fathers, and grandparents if you
have not seen Hidden Figures take your children and
other children if possible to see this movie that not
only shows the historical application of education
and cultural  pride and respect, that gender is not
a liability
, color is not a curse, there is a blending of
historical successes and  global influence.

movie-relaxing

Hidden Figures opens the mind’s eye that anything is
possible, t
hat dreams can be achieved, and intelligence
is Dope and Lit.
What is next is up to parents, schools, churches and
communities to support children, youth and teens.
Time will tell, graduations rates from high school
and college will tell and the growing number of girls
and boys of co
lor in  STEM careers will tell.

 

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