My Quest To Teach

November 10, 2015

Social Media: Parents vs Teens


Social Media: Parents vs Teens

The holiday seasons are coming quickly, new high tech devices
are allowing teens to increase their Social Media connections
with friends. Social Media networks like; Facebook, Twitter,
Instagram, Vine, SnapChat, Youtube and others allow for the
exchange of all types of social information both positive and
negative.
SM by teens are their primary means of sharing information and
posting personal content. Parents should be prepared for the
increase in digital connections, Smartphones, tablets and even
watches open diverse challenges to managing personal information
in which some type does not need to be share.

Wireless technologies have allowed for unprecedented access
to people and data. Because of the easy access to online resources
there should always be open communication between youth/teens
with their parents. The distractions and dangers of life can quickly
bring tragedy and second guessing of parental responsibilities
and accountability for young lives when there is death or injury
from Cyberbullying and misunderstood intentions.

Parents cannot allow Social Media to be a baby sitter for their children
just as television should not be a substitute for parental engagement
and teaching social skills. Parents may find it difficult to start a
conversation about the use of technology and Social Media; start
the conversation about the inclusion of Social Media in a teen’s life,
parents should understand that their children may know more about
technology, but parent knows more about life and survival skills.
This fact alone can strengthen the conversation on safety and survival
in a world of diversity in ideologies, economic status and educational
access. Social Media is a snapshot of our society, being connected to
multiple people with diverse backgrounds.
There are growing numbers of youth and teens being lured and seduced
into prostitution, sexual torture and murdered from online meetups.
Technology is necessary, an important part life, the bond between
families cannot afford to be disrupted by electronic devices.

Communication is in a digital arena not verbal so Social Media, texting
and digital interaction is common with teens. This interaction is not
always sexual, but the sharing of social information can lead to situations
of personal invasion. Because of the intrusiveness of technology parents
need to set boundaries just as they would if their child or children were
at a playground or a swimming pool.
Parents need to monitor what is being shared online, some information
may be dangerous or lead to future problems in developing relationships
or potential child stalkers becoming friends with unguided and
unmonitored youth and teens.

As a Teacher of the Year, STEAM educator, a national/international
Blogger and presenter of Social Media Safety, with over 25 years in
public education and higher education, many teens lack the appropriate
processing skills to manage their Social Media content. What they put
online can be used as a benefit when they become adults or a hazard
during the developing teen years.
A quick comment, a moment of frustration, the thrust of jealousy and a
period of anger can cause teens to post comments that have profanity,
potential slanderous statements or even threats of physical or property
damage.

Parents cannot afford to be negligent, ignorant or complacent in their
child or children’s social media activities. “Parents need to be involved
and engaged even checking phones, tablets, laptops and desktops”
William Jackson 2012.
Stages of development for online behavior are a gradual process
requiring parental supervision and parental communication. Schools
cannot be responsible to totally teaching technology literacy. Canada,
France, Britain and Australia all have national media literacy standards
for students in their educational curriculum; the United States because
the educational system is decentralized does not have a national model.
Parents must be the guiding force of reason and education outside of
the school. Parents set the tone for Social Media morals and ethics
in Social Media conduct.

A very important reminder anything that is put online stays online and
never goes away. Even if a student tries to delete their online content
it is backed-up on a server someplace and can be accessed.

Social Media: Parents vs Teens
Parents should spend more time with their kids and teens, parental
involvement is important and contact not through the Internet or cell
phones. Communication is becoming a lost art between parents and
their children. Children and teens will post personal information online
faster than thinking that they should not. This presents potential
dangers that are broad and can influence future safety of the family.
Talking can save your child’s life or the families from Internet and the
dangers that are a real and present danger.

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October 25, 2015

What Should You Take Away from the Black Expo 2015


What Should You Take Away from the Black Expo 2015
by William Jackson, M.Ed.
Teacher of the Year, Instructor at Edward Waters College
Social Media Visionary with Reader Theater and
Empowerment Resources, Mentor in 5000 Role Models
and Supporter of E3 Business Group North Florida Chapter
Blogger, Social Media Presenter, Community Activist

The Black Expo of 2015 can be seen as a success in many
ways not just economically, although that is important in its
significance to show the value of Black dollars. The cultural
influences of businesses, entrepreneurs, ministries, educational
entities, community based groups that work with youth, teens,
young adults and even the seniors of the community can be
seen as a polarizing force for community unification, cultural
pride and social influence. #BlackBusinessesDoMatter

The Black Expo should be seen that in order for Blacks to see
economic change in their communities they must make the changes
themselves by investing in their own communities, investing in their
youth, investing in the educational system, investing in STEM/STEAM
community projects; not waiting for outside entities or government to
tell Blacks what to do, how to do it and when to do it, then turn around and
take Black dollars from Black communities to re-invest in other areas that
do not help Black families. #IndenturedServitudedHasEnded


The Adventures of Moxie Girl

The presence of businesses like Angie Nixon and her daughter Natalie
(The Adventures of Moxie Girl), to the educational and community
volunteerism of young people like Taylor Richardson, “An Agent of STEAM,”
to the Teen Leaders of America (Marcia Brown, Executive Director), and
even new groups that are servicing the teens of Jacksonville, Florida,
there is new growth for teens.


Taylor Richardson “An Agent of STEAM”

Youth, teens and young adults do have outlets to express their creative
abilities, there are things to do in Jacksonville just for youth, teens and our
young adults like the Jax Youth Poetry Slam, Inc. that opens doors for
youth to use poetry, spoken word and even dramatizations to express their
experiences in life, Creating New Directions is working with youth to excel in
life through education and mentoring. Reader Theater and the Black Superheroes
highlights the historic successes of ex-slaves and the historical contributions
of Blacks through theatrical reading and acting. There are more……….
#BlackYouthNeedSupport


Elisha Taylor of Westside Church of Christ working
with Readers Theater in technology and Social Media

There can be no doubt that African Americans / Blacks / People of Color
or whatever new terms are being used for this, and in this new generation
are being applied are showing that there is still economic power and influence
within the Black / African American communities.

Business mentorship and educational mentorship is vital to keep Black
businesses running and contributing to the community. “The Black community
cannot afford to criticize each other, talk down to each other or stab each
other in the back because the consequences affect us all.”  William Jackson, M.Ed.

Blacks in government should not cheat the Black communities from investments
to send to other parts of Jacksonville for personal gain, they are accountable to
multiple generations of Blacks and their success and value.
The mental influence to Black youth when they see Black businesses at the Black
Expo carries enormous pride and dignity and shows the value of education,
mentoring, hard work, and participation/contribution in their communities. To take
pride in their abilities and to learn how to Market and Brand themselves in
positive directions, not what is seen in the media with negativity.
#BlackYouthNeedMentors

The pride of Black business owners can be seen in their professional
mannerisms, attention to professional dress and speech, and application
of diverse technologies. The importance of having a 30 to 60 second “pitch”
is seen as you hear enthusiastic presentations not just to sell something,
but to inform, educate and encourage. Passing out business cards, flyers,
DVD’s, posters and taking selfies to post online. These are all tools to share
content that creates interests, forms valuable relationships and helps to build
clients, customers and even volunteers for community projects.

What Should You Take Away from the Black Expo 2015;
1.cultural pride, 2. gender growth (there are increased businesses run by
women), 3. increased cultural and self-esteem, 4. being prepared at all times
to share information, 5. proper planning to prepare for potential partnerships,
6.building sound business sense, 7.having a business plan, 8. always have business
cards handy, 9. awareness to effectively use technology and Social Media in
positive ways, 10.involving youth/teens to teach them business etiquette,
11. involve teens in activities that teach business management, 12. the value
of education and being a life-long learner, 13. how to properly network,
14. no room for being shy, scared or complacent in life, 15. the power of a
handshake, a smile and direct eye contact. 16. stay in contact with clients and
customers, 17. use free services from the Better Business Bureau, Small Business
Association and other groups. 18. attend workshops and conferences,
19. know your value, 20. plan monthly and yearly to manage your budget and take
business classes.

Two key points, the Black community will only grow as its youth, teens and
young adults grow. They need community and school mentors in programs
like 5000 Role Models of Duval County Public Schools, E3 Business Group
program (So You Want to be an Entrepreneur) given by Anthony Butler, and
even the Call Me Mister program of Edward Waters College that helps build
young men to become educators.

The Black Expo of 2015 should not end with business as usual, there should
be transformative growth, increased networking events in the Black community,
increased re-investment/investment opportunities, educational support in
schools and sharing of resources to increase the strength of community initiatives
that build Black businesses.

Don’t let next year’s Black Expo 2016 be the only place where you meet the
same people and make the same promise to do the same thing with the same results.

rtrc
Coming in February 2016 – Real Talk Real Change “Who Da Man?!”
https://www.facebook.com/events/1454838178151912
Time for men to standup and speak up and man up!!!!!

June 9, 2015

30 Books for Parents Raising a Black Male/Female Child

30 Books for Parents Raising a Black Male/Female Child

There are a great deal of resources to help parents
“teach” their children the necessary academic skills
in order to be successful in school. One of the programs
is “The Raising Him Alone Campaign” and its list of 30
Books for Parents raising a Black Male Child.

The books selected inspire, challenge, confuse and
stimulate the minds and hearts of parents raising
boys/girls in a “challenging” society.
The campaign realizes that raising a Black male/female
child can be both rewarding and difficult, there is help.

These are some resources that I shared months ago,
with summer here parents and their children can use
their time wisely, if encouraged and read this summer.
Looking at the “Adventures of Moxie Girl,” The Black
Superheroes and other local works, it is important
that children need to read more, and make
reading fun and enjoyable.

The third grade reading scores of our babies shows
a need for books in their hands and to be encouraged,
inspired and praised to motivate them.

Please share this list with other parents;
“If the village does not embrace learning and wisdom
what does that say about the future of the children?”
William Jackson – Edward Waters College
#EducationalTechnology #EWCTIGERS
For more information check the public library in your
community or city.

Group SuperHeroes – Readers Theater

A Black Parent’s Handbook to
Educating Your Children
(Outside of the Classroom) by Baruti K. Kafele
1. A Hand to Guide Me by Denzel Washington
2. Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful
African American Males by Freeman A. Hrabowski,
Kenneth I. Maton, and Geoffrey L. Greif
3. Cooked: From the Streets to the Stove, from Cocaine
to Foie Gras by Jeff Henderson
4. How to Get Out of Debt: Get an a Credit Rating for
Free Using the System I’ve Used Successfully With
Thousands of Clients by Harrine Freeman
5. Kill Them Before They Grow: Misdiagnosis of African
American
Boys in American Classrooms by Michael Porter
6. Letters to Young Brothers by Hill Harper
7. Morning by Morning: How We Home-Schooled Our
African-American Sons to the Ivy League by
Paula Penn-Nabrit
8. Keeping Black Boys Out of Special Education
by Jawanza Kunjufu
9. Raising Black Boys by Jawanza Kunjufu
10. Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life
of Boys by Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson


Taylor Richardson “An Agent of STEAM”

11. Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths
of Boyhood by William Pollack and Mary Pipher
12. Saving Our Sons by Marita Golden
13. Single Mamahood: Advice and Wisdom for the
African-American Single Mother by Kelly Williams
14. Stickin’ To, Watchin’ Over, and Gettin’ With:
An African American Parent’s Guide to Discipline
by Howard Stevenson, Gwendolyn Davis &
Saburah Abdul-Kabir
15. Strength for Their Journey: 5 Essential Disciplines
African-American Parents Must Teach Their Children and
Teens by Robert L. Johnson & Paulette Stanford
16. Tapping the Power Within: A Path to
Self-Empowerment for Women by Iyanla Vanzant
17. The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life
by Kevin Powell
18. The Bond: Three Young Men Learn to Forgive and
Reconnect with Their Fathers by Sampson Davis,
Rameck Hunt & George Jenkins
19. The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and
Fulfill a Dream by Sampson Davis, George Jenkins,
Rameck Hunt, and Remeck Hunt
20. The Pursuit of Happyness by Chris Gardner


Natalie #AdventuresofMoxieGirl

21. The Single Mom’s Little Book of Wisdom
by Cassandra Mack
22. The Warrior Method: A Parents’ Guide to Rearing
Healthy Black Boys by Raymond Winbush
23. Yesterday, I Cried: Celebrating the Lessons of
Living and Loving by Iyanla Vanzant
24. Being a Black Man: At the Corner of Progress
and Peril by Kevin Merida
25. Black Pain: It Just Looks Like We’re Not Hurting
by Terrie Williams
26. Boys Adrift: The Five Factors Driving the Growing
Epidemic of Unmotivated Boys and Underachieving Young
Men by Leonard Sax
27. Boys into Men: Raising Our African American Teenage
Sons by Nancy Boyd-Franklin, Pamela A. Toussaint, and
A. J. Franklin
28. 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know
by LaMarr Darnell Shields
29. Come On People: On the Path from Victims to Victors
by Bill Cosby

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