My Quest To Teach

October 1, 2016

Africans Start to Hashtag and Google Yourselves Part 1

african
Africans Start to Hashtag and Google Yourselves
William Jackson, M.Ed.
@wmjackson
Edward Waters College
Educational Technology and Social Media
#MyQuestToTech

The elevation of Africans having access to the
Internet is increasing the digital footprint of
those denied access to information for years.
Internet access supplied by providers is allowing
people in cities, villages and towns unprecedented
access to information.

Africans are embracing their Afrinerdiness
(African Nerds) that encourages global collaboration,
cross cultural connections, access to entertainment
media, and educational resources never seen before.
There is so much digital eye candy that African teens
and young adults need to be cautious of the glitz and
glamour of global content.
As Africans grow in engagement, their words
will have new meaning in the global context of their
digital content that will expand. The perceptions
they create will define them, the digital ether can
quickly and unmercifully absorb the
attentions of Africans and present a unfathomable
world of cultural.

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Googling will have a new meaning for Africans,
their created content is fresh, unfiltered by world
exposure and lack of  Internet etiquette and guidelines
in some cases. African children are in many ways no
different than European, Asian or American, many
want their content to go viral, with the potential of
making them instant superstars and celebrities.

African parents like others from around the world
must be very cautious of their children’s access to
online content because it can literally be addicting
and life changing. Unfiltered access to the Internet
in some cases may be a Pandora box because African
children like those of other nations may not
inappropriate content being created and read
or viewed.

hashtags

For African parents to keep up with their children
they should Hashtag and Google their children
regularly. To digitally follow them, not stalk but
check to make sure they are not being lead or
drawn into dangerous digital territories.

African parents must be educated on setting
boundaries for their families in the absence of
local, national and continental laws safeguarding
children from predators, stalkers, scammers and
even terrorists. As a professor teaching
Educational Technology and Social Media safety
in higher education, youth, teens and even
young adults do not understand the dangers of
posting to much information online about
themselves, their families and even their
ideologies related to religion, sex and education.

There are still parts of Africa that are not and
may not embrace the ideas of freedom of speech,
and open society to information and even the
freedom of girls and women accessing
educational resources. Educational institutions
across Africa are going to have to develop
policies and procedures to make sure all
students no matter their religious background,
cultural upbringing, economic status, political
status and even mobility will have to have
equitable access and support.

As a parent of two I demand equal educational
resources for my daughter like my son. My
daughters value is just as important as my son
from elementary to university levels.
As an educator I have equal expectations of success
for my male and females students. My educational
diversity is that I teach on the elementary and
college levels and see all sides of educational
success and the results of educational failure by
lack of involvement by parents.

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The development of policies, procedures and
practices cannot be made by one entity, it must
be inclusive of Internet Service Providers,
educational institutions, departments of
government and even involve African parental
groups because  they are the grassroots of
addressing issues and concerns.

There must be further opportunities to teach
parents about the online world so they can monitor
their children through Googling and Hashtags.
Many in government and business are of the
opinion that it is too early to address these issues,
I say there is not a level to early to empower parents
to teach their kids and to be  cautious and aware
of their safety.
Just as in the United States, I travel to teach
parents about Social Media Safety, Etiquette,
prevention of cyberbullying,  cyberstalking,
Sexting and other online activities are creating
social issues that have direct influence in the
social and educational order for families.

google

For too long Europeans have tried to determine
what is best for African people without asking
them, Internet access creates a  platform where
education is for everyone – equally.
The power of Google searches, Hashtags,
Branding, Marketing,  collaboration and even
association has a powerful place in global
communities. African parents learn to
Google their children,and Hashtag them.

hashtags2

Part II Suggestions for African Parents
When Monitoring Their Children Online

marcus

Hashtags
The Africa the media never shows
#TheAfricaTheMediaNeverShowsYou

Twitter
https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheAfricaTheMediaNeverShowsYou?src=hash

Elle Decoration
http://elledecoration.co.za/theafricathemedianevershowsyou-2/

The Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/jun/30/the-africa-the-media-never-shows-you-in-pictures

Blogging about Africa
https://blog.fh.org/2015/07/theafricathemedianevershowsyou/

July 15, 2016

Part 1 and Part 2 Chinua Achebe and How to Build a Blog

Part 1 and Part 2 Chinua Achebe and How to Build a Blog
by William Jackson
Edward Waters College
#MyQuestToTeach

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“writers have to recognize the works of the
artist and those of the activist. Creating
content is more than just throwing words,
video, pictures on a digital sheet of paper.
There is serious intellectual thought during
the writing process. Sometimes writing
will be in a zone of creativity and innovation
to create new content that has an intended
outcome, but sometimes the outcomes are unknown.”
William Jackson
National and international Blogger and Speaker

“There is a story I needed to tell”
Chinua Achebe “African Voices”
The writings and interviews of Nigerian writer,
poet, storyteller, academic and parent are
transferable to the art of blogging.

Telling a story is not dependent on the
platform whether it is digital or the
traditional paper platforms. Creating a
story comes from the need to share
information that a person thinks is
important and valuable. There is an effort
to put information down that you feel
will benefit others.

Writers like Achebe from Nigeria, Africa,
even though he has passed are able to
transfere the passion of writing to bloggers
because those that blog share on a platform
that is connected globally. Information is
shared at the speed of thought on platforms
like WordPress/Blogger, Microblogging also
known as Twitter, Pinterest, Podcasting
where content is downloaded to digital
devices and even on audio/video platforms.

Lessons need to be shared with new
generations of bloggers, content creators,
thought leaders, innovators, creatives as
each generation has a story to tell.
Successful “bloggers” which is a term
that is transferable across platforms
should understand the past history of
storytelling and the connection of
embracing personal experiences.

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Time for African Americans and Africans
to tell their stories.
1. African American and African writers
need to understand things need to be
done to help their communities instead
of complaining and using Social Media
to “throw people under the bus.”

2. African American and African writers
need to understand their place in the
world. That they have a responsibility
to tell their story.

3. African American and African writers
need to understand who their inspirations
are. Who infleunces their growth and
share that knowledge.

4. African American and African writers
need to understand if they do not write
truth to life they are creating a “Gap
in the Bookshelf” in the stories of people
of color and culture.

5. African American and African writers
need to understand the importance of
stories of peple of color and culture.
Mainstream media does not show the “best”
of people of color and culture every day.
It is the importance of bloggers of color
and culture that can collectively get the
stories out.

6. African American and African writers
need to understand what picture they are
painting of their culture and their people.

7. African American and African writers
need to understand as Achebe states,
“fiction can be written as true,” by the
reliance on factual elements.

8. African American and African writers
need to understand that in their blogs
resonate with their readers and create
emotion and action.

9. African American and African writers
need to understand the “human story,”
and the “human condition” to feel their
readers.

10. African American and African writers
need to understand that storytelling is
a creative art and a way of influencing
thought and perceptions.

11. African American and African writers
need to understand the importance to stay
connected and grounded to their inspiration.

12. African American and African writers
need to understand it is valuable to be
connected between their research and
personal experiences.

13. African American and African writers
need to understand there is not one way
to share a story. The diversity of Social
Media allow for content to be spread globally
and through divere platforms.

14. African American and African writers
need to understand that diversity in writing
means that bloggers/writers must remain
students of literature.

15. African American and African writers
need to understand that when Chinua Achebe
states, “storytelling is a threat to anyone
in control,” or “seeking to take away control,
the storyteller has a different agenda”
than those in control.

16. African American and African writers
need to understand they cannot afford to be
selfish or self promoting with their talents.
They cannot put themselves ahead of their
readers.

Part 2 Chinua Achebe and How to Build a Blog

chinua-achege-2

Bloggers cannot just sit on their asses,
they need to be involved in their communities,
attending community meetings, volunteering
with youth, teens and young adults. The
way to build an online community is to be
involved in the community. Online
communities have a responsibility to
support offline communities that have a
mission and vision to help youth, teens,
young adults and even elders.

Listed are things bloggers need to
be aware of when building content and
sharing information. From Achebe, Soyinka,
and other writers locally or globally the
skill of storytelling is not easy. The
act or blogging is not always easy because
of the intended outcomes can be varied and
the audiences ability and willingness of
listening and engaging.

African Americans and African Writers
need to blog to tell their stories. No one
else can do that. The history of colonization,
slavery, Civil Rights, Racism, Colorism,
raising children of color and culture all are
stories that need to be told. For to long mass
media has told the false, half truths, lies and
fallacies of African Americans, Africans and
others of color and culture.

17. African American and African writers
need to understand they have a cultural
responsibility to protect their culture
from being mentally colonized and enslaved.

18. African American and African writers
need to understand it is important to
keep a mind open to embrace creativity
and imagination.

19. African American and African writers
need to understand they cannot allow
others to tell one side of a story, nor
create a false story.

20. African American and African writers
need to understand their power in creating
memories through their writing.

21. Chinua Achebe, “I write because I enjoy it.”

22. African American and African writers
need to understand they should be inspiring,
encouraging, and engaging other writers of
color and culture who want to be writers.

23. African American and African writers
need to understand that their volunteering
and speaking to children, teens and young
adults encourages “children to fly,” and
“parents/adults must not keep children
grounded.” Exposure is important to plant
the seeds of knowledge and direction.
Chinua Achebe

24. African American and African writers
need to understand they give voice to the
poor, the powerless and the stricken.

25. African American and African writers
need to understand when participating
in their communities they must have
a passion and intensity to improve their
communities.

26. African American and African writers
need to understand “they need to have an
itch to bring about change.” Chinua Achebe

26. African American and African writers
need to understand, “We have a responsibility
to make our stories known.” Chinua Achebe

27. African American and African writers
need to understand as writers of truth
caution is not getting caught up in
political, religious, cultural and social
agendas and lies.

28. African American and African writers
need to understand in them, “there are
novels waiting to be transformed.”
Chinua Achebe

29. African American and African writers
need to understand the urgency to tell a
story to those that need to be inspired
and uplifted.

30. African American and African writers
need to understand there is power in their
stories.

31. African American and African writers
need to understand they can depict people
of color and culture with dignity and
respect. Mass media shows people of color
as “creatures and things” not the morality
of life and liberty.

32. African American and African writers
need to be careful of the level of their
writings. Not everyone reading will be a
college graduate, in politics, speak
articulately, read as the same level,
or have the same life experiences.

33. African American and African writers
need to understand they should make every
effort worth the effort of writing.

34. Writers should have mentors and
role models to guide them.

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In this world of diversity and culture
bloggers must be careful of their souls,
their morals and values. Their content will
never go away so should be careful and
cautious of how the world perceives them
and their associations.

June 6, 2016

How Do You Change African American Communities Part I

Corrections to this blog!!!
Thanks to @oJaison for seeing my typos and wrong information about
Ngugi wa Thiong’o is Kenyan, not Nigerian.

How Do You Change African American 
Communities Part I

Lessons learned from Nigerians:
Wole Soyinka, Chinua Achebe and
Ngugi wa Thiong’o
African writers, poets, play writes and
community activists.

The question of “how do you change African
American communities has been asked for years.
The diverse answers range from more federal
monies, to increased investment, to changing
the legislative bodies of the elected officials,
to building cultural diversity and the list
continues. One of the lessons is to learn
from how valuable and important education is
to a community. The recognition of academic
stars along with athletic accomplishments.

The visibility of who the academic successes
are and their entrance into higher education,
starting military careers, gaining local
and national recognition for hard work,
realistic expectations for continuing
education and the global perspective that
education can take a student places and
expose them to people and experiences that
athletics will not.

Lessons can be learned from the Watson Institute
of Brown’s University with Nigerian Wole Soyinka
and Chinua Achebe – poets, writers, political
and community activists show a dynamic
connection between using literature and reading
to create transformative changes in communities.

People of color and culture have a vision for
change that can be applied to many
African American communities across the nation
as is being done in Africa.
Listening to writing giants on YouTube
that have influenced not just thousands, but
millions of Nigerians and across the continent
of Africa to global penetration. Wole Soyinka
and Chinua Achebe share their passions to
improving their culture and national strength
in all areas of national importance. Their
outlooks on life are shared by their parents
involvement in their community at a young age,
their political involvement and strong religious
beliefs.

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Each man has been culturally and academically
groomed and prepared for the dynamic roles they
play and the influences they have from their
participation in writing, poetry and as play writes.
African American families can take these examples
to improve the future of their communities.

Listening to the many interviews of Solinka,
Achebe and Ngugi wa Thiong’o (Kenyan),
the passion for their country can be heard.
The desire to serve their communities
and to help improve their nation ahead
of their needs. Each made the
decision to take a stand for their people
similar to African Americans like Malcolm X,
James Baldwin, Carter G. Woodson and others.

2

Prof. Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o

Soyinka, Achebe and Ngugi wa Thiong’o
were hunted by government forces and
threatened with death for
their dedication to a better nation from
colonization by British rule to the fight for
democracy or changes to corrupt African governments.
Listening to the interviews I learned that
African Americans cannot sit back and cry, cus,
complain, and make noise then not be ready
to put their hands in the muck to help make
changes in their communities first. The fight
for improved communities, better education,
employment and increased political influence
start from home, the home communities where
change is needed, the home
communities where schools need volunteers,
mentoring, after school tutoring and a voice
at city council and school board meetings.

African Americans have to know what their passions
and priorities are, they have to have something
they feel needs fixing to benefit their communities
not just for personal gains. Soyinka and Achebe
used their talents to help their communities and
nation through education, to make transformative
changes using literature, writing, plays and
other venues to encourage thinking and unity.

Everyone wants to change the world, how about
starting with your own communities.
“Be the change you want to see..”
Get out and vote, get out in your
communities and get involved.
Volunteer in your community schools…..
Show Up, Show Out and come ready to work!!!

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