My Quest To Teach

April 30, 2017

POWHERFUL Women and BROTHERHOOD of MEN

20170415_084719

 

POWHERFUL Women and BROTHERHOOD of MEN
Girl Version 

by William Jackson
Twitter @wmjackson
Blogging #MyQuestToTeach

The recent summits for teen and young adults in Jacksonville
shows that the community understands the need for engagement
with young ladies and young men of this city and Northeast
Florida.
To build leaders, strengthen community, encourage personal
self-esteem and the importance of applied educational knowledge
to help young ladies and young men build into leaders and
activists.
High schools; private, public and charter were represented
well by the participants that showed young people in Jacksonville
are among the best and brightest in the nation.
Both teen and young adult women and men need to understand the
value of applying their learning to potential careers and
future growth in economics, commerce, business, politics,
community services and as entrepreneurs that will run businesses
employing their peers.
Education is not just gained in school classrooms; networking
is a learned skill and having self-esteem, self-respect,
life goals and long term aspirations is vital.
The POWHERFUL and I CHOOSE BROTHERHOOD summits each empower
their unique audience of teens and young adults geared to
that audience. The diversity of attendance represents the
cultural diversity of Northeast Florida and that all cultures
are valuable and contibute to the success of our city.
Each summit had local and national influencers in a various
industries that draw local and national attention to issues
important to teens and young adults.
Summits like these touch on a broader audience and has
a ripple affect in teens and young adults becoming themselves
influencers and smart creatives in their community and schools.
The unique nature of each summit is that there were not gender
distractions. POWHERFUL was dedicated to young ladies and
I CHOOSE BROTHERHOOD dedicated to young men.
Jacksonville needs to continue to provide summits, workshops,
and conferences that focus on teens and young adult issues,
they cannot be ignored nor denied the constitutional rights
they are guaranteed of opportunities of speak and assembly.
Jacksonville is learning that issues are not settled by law
enforcement, laws, curfews or other legislative embargoes.
Children, youth, teens and young adults need interactive
engagement with the adults in their lives to talk about
the issues that are important to them.
As a parent, educator, mentor and community activist the best
results are gained by caring and showing that you do care about
young people by being engaged and active. Society can only be
best served when our children, teens and young adults know
that they can be seen and heard.

20170415_094448
Resources:
POWHERFUL – Instagram – Twitter – Facebook = @powherfulfdn
Soledad O’Brien, Starfish Foundation – Twitter @soledadobrien
Sheba Turk , News Anchor – Twitter @shebaturk
Akia Uwanda , Entertainer and Entrepreneur
FB – akiauwandaentertainer – Twitter – @akiauwanda

Videos:
Akia Uwanda how she started her career
https://youtu.be/eMLFq_Vs0AM
Blue Print for Success
https://youtu.be/lkI4TnMoy1Q
Financial Aid for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/rmDMpz0AGSU
First Step to get Money
https://youtu.be/JQIdQbKvbn8
Free Money for School
https://youtu.be/RMc0e2Mh2s8
Getting Loans for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/38Fjt7ITmas
How to Address Bullying In School
https://youtu.be/fr4NmN09WYM
Scholarships for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/sgyfi7cthtA
Starting A Music Career Akia Uwanda
https://youtu.be/gABGgFXpFKU
Starting Your Careers
https://youtu.be/cNI_lnSiXdY
The Stress of Bullying
https://youtu.be/PEfNaVqTzns

My Photos:
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/POWHERFUL%202017/story

 

20170415_091331

Advertisements

February 5, 2017

Who Writes Your Life Story HBCU Students?

Who Writes Your Life Story HBCU Students?
by Professor William Jackson
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

Using the TEDx presentation to
encourage all HBCU students to live up
to their expectations and not to listen
to the stereotypes of others based on
color, gender and social-economic background.
Who writes your life story? | Hill Krishnan | TEDxCalPoly
https://youtu.be/OscDpHfrtog

Each HBCU student has a story to tell, an adventure
or a situation that allows each of us to share our
travels in a world of continuous change and adaptation.
The human spirit is sometimes defined by the actions and
in actions we take as we make the journey into and through
the challenges, chaos, confusion, storms and welcoming
calmness that we experience during the time we are on this
plane of life.
Students in my Educational Technology class are required
to manage a traditional blog, writing for several weeks
about their talents, passions, goals, likes and challenges.
Just as other classes for the past 4 years that have taken
Educational Technology, Social Media and STEM at Edward
Waters College. Those that are in the Department of
Education and Urban Studies are required to take this class,
but more and more students in other disciplines are seeing
the value of writing for their life.
Encouraging students to write can be challenging because
you have to show the reasons why they should do this and
how it can benefit them.
There needs to be tangible and connecting situations and
circumstances to show that writing can increase networking,
create a positive digital footprint and show the potential to
increase visibility in the job market and potential financial
benefits.

use

Attending an HBCU there are benefits and some potential things
that can hold a person back. The term HBCU is not always
beneficial in the white corporate world because it may be
perceived as unskilled, ill-prepared, lower educational
achievement, minority, ghetto, inner-city and slow. These may
be some of the perceptions carried by labels and assumptions.
Labels can deny access to equitable educational access and even
the mental stereotypes that can affect performance in the classroom.
I share with my students to never let someone else’s expectations
define their life and their successes.
As a father of two college age young adults I have seen how low
expectations of teachers, friends and even the community affect
the self perceptions of children. When my children were in
elementary and middle I constantly encouraged them to read, to
think for themselves and not like the crowd, I took my kids to
conferences, workshops and other events that offered
exposure and learning. Why more Black families do not do this
there are many excuses.
Understanding diversity was important because my children had
to understand that this world, this nation is diverse and they
had to be able to cope with the integration and collaboration
of races. To many times people said I was raising my children like
they were white, but in actuality I was raising them to live in a
white world where mental toughness was necessary, having dreams,
goals and a mission in life made living valuable and being Black was
an asset not collateral damage.
Parents must always build up their children even if there are
challenges to their mental abilities, children can overcome and
compensate for many challenges if the parents do not have lower
expectations for success. Speak and breath life and a love for
learning. This is where to many African American families fall
short, living under the expectations of others that see them
as second class citizens, as potential criminals, welfare
recipients and even kids being in ESE and EBD classes not
Gifted and Talented classes.
The parent is the first educator and creates a foundation for
growth and development for a life-time. Parents create the
mental foundation for how their child will stand and deliver
energies that motivate and expand success or accept the mode of
below average living and relying on governmental
assistance.

HBCUs have a history of overcoming challenges and even
atrocities that are thrown at them because of the strong will
for success and rising like the Phoenix. If the parent assumes
their child cannot read past a certain level and mental comprehension
they deny their child the gifts of literature, reading, exposure
and even interactions that can open mental doors to expand the
horizons to be better then they currently are.
In my class I use TEDx Talks to show the similarities of cultural
and generational experiences to help students to understand
they do not have to live by others expectations and stereotypes.
They have options to experience and manage their life to be what
they want it to be by embracing learning and exposure to
new things in life.
Using a platform of blogging to step out away from the limitations
of people placed because they only only see color, zip codes or
area codes, student writing can take them globally any where in the
world because they can adapt their writing to embrace not just
the diversity of people, but the diversity of thought,
rationalization and the emotional connections that bring about
unity and respect.
Who writes your life story? | Hill Krishnan | TEDxCalPoly
https://youtu.be/OscDpHfrtog
Is a way for students at HBCUs to share in a story of
mental and emotional neglect and abuse. Even through
the hell of low expectations HBCU students can rise
to new heights and accomplish unbelieveable success.
HBCU students start to write your own story, never
allow anyone else to write your story, to cast you
into a category and try to keep you there.
It is a choice, a decision that you make.
Choose wisely what direction you will go, by your
decisions or by the decisions of others that only see
you based on ignorance, racism, prejudice and hate.
Listening to “Who writes your life story?” |
Hill Krishnan | TEDxCalPoly is a way to break free
of the pain and limitations of others.

11

Resources:
Who Writes Your Life Story?
Hill Krishnan | TEDxCalPoly
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OscDpHfrtog&t=424s

Real Talk Real Change by E3 Business Group
RTRC VIII: “We Are Women, Hear Us More!!”
https://eventium.io/events/1036938196421735/real-talk-real-change-viii

October 15, 2016

Black Girl Magic Tell Your Story

Black Girl Magic Tell Your Story
by William Jackson, M.Ed.
Edward Waters College @wmjackson

 

This is the age
for women of color
and culture to be
engaged with technology
locally, but thinking globally.
This is what I teach
my students in my Educational Technology,
Social Media and STEM class at Edward Waters
College. They all matter in the grand scheme
of this developing nation.

The ability to tell a story is not limited
to simplistic writing or blogging, the new
move is towards “Mobile Film Making” and
“Mobile Microblogging,” and “Video Blogging.”
The use of phones, tablets and even watches
has opened new doors for using mobile devices
to allow women of color and culture to be
filmmakers, creating documentaries and
sharing the growth of women of all colors
and cultures their journey’s
implementing technology.

global image

The integration of digital devices that are
mobile provides the opportunity to present
stories in real time and with unprecedented
accuracy. Not using props, make believe
backgrounds or even deadpan musical play-overs
and sound effects. Girls and Women of color
are discovering their creativity with mobile
technology and throwing away fears to embrace
innovation and encourage new creative ideas.

In the recent article shared with me by my
dear friend Tiffany Duhart (@asktdn), an
original Black Girl Magic sister, before
there was a Black Girl Magic, she shared the
article “Using Mobile Film Making to Tell
Stories,” 4/20/16 in Black Enterprise
Mobile by Kali Wilder.

Matthew Cherry an independent film maker
has created critically acclaimed movies
using his iPhone6s. His intent is to
inspire people especially youth, teens
and young adults to use tech in a positive
way by integrating mobile technology to help
tell their stories and implementing Social
Media to broadcast. Girls and women
of color are becoming influential innovators
and even thought leaders in applying technology
to real world applications.

“It doesn’t matter about the camera you
shoot on it’s all about the story.”
Kali Wilder
Technology provides a unique opportunity
for people of color and culture especially
young people to tell their stories on a global
and interactive platform. Interactivity
provides immediate feedback and draws the
attention of the intended audiences.
Social Media provides platforms that encourage
the creation of dynamic and original content.
Vblogging, Microblogging, Podcasting, and
other platforms for the most part are free
and easily accessible on phones and tablets.
Content Creation is King…………..

Cherry points out that artist can use those
platforms to support levels of engagement.
There is an awesome networking potential for
women of color that allows for increased
exposure to issues that affect them. The
movement building great momentum of
#BlackGirlMagic is cross generational and
allows girls and women to network and share
intellectual resources, talents and abilities.
Girls are no longer afraid of technology
because they see their creativity,
they express a passion that boys in many
cases do not possess.

20160128_160939
Educational Technology at
Edward Waters College

In my Educational Technology and Social Media
course, blogging is a foundation for learning,
as technology advances people of color must
advance as well when integrating and being
creators of content not just consumers. Blogging
allows for reading, comprehensible growth and
allowing boys and girls to find their skill-sets
because not everyone is a coder, is not a developer,
but has their skill-sets that can be enhanced and
magnified when tech is properly applied.

Educational Technology in many schools has
diverse instructional directions and applications,
the goal for my curriculum is to make sure students
are exposed to and utilize platforms to teach
them to create their Brand and Market themselves.
I hope to inspire both young men and women to think
strategically. Each person, especially Black Girl Magic
girls and women need to be the CEO’s of themselves.

reading 8
Natalie McGriff – Moxie Girl
Black Girl Magic

Being the CEO’s of themselves means they have to
chart their course, define their Brand(s) and how
to effectively Market themselves beyond local
visibility to global awareness and integration
in the diversity of technology. Examples come in
the form of Melissa James – Founder and CEO of
The Tech Connection and Sherrell Dorsey – Founder
of ThePLUG both can be heard on the program
Blacks In Technology
https://www.blacksintechnology.net/
Their Brands represent them so must be based on
a solid foundation that others can connect too and
relate too.

The tools are there, right at the finger tips
literally so why not integrate them in creating
positive content that gives women of color with
Black Girl Magic a chance to tell their stories
and enhance their hustle.

People of color and culture have access to tools,
platforms, digital devices to share their
diversity in their SoLoMo journeys.
Girls and women of Black Girl Magic, must understand
their digital presence is influenced and influences
their So-cial interactions for future opportunities
to grow, their Lo-cal exposure to be seen by people
to help them move in the direction they want to go
locally and globally, and the power of Mo-bile
technology engages video and instant development
and sharing. SoLoMo

Social engagements Local involvement in their
communities and applying their use of Mobile
devices that integrate technologies that is
growing more and more intuitive in learning
what the user wants to do. Black Girl Magic is
growing, but must be able to expand the direction
and even services to inspire and continue
engagement.

Taylor at MLK breakfast
Taylor Richardson = Black Girl Magic

Girls and women of color and culture are advised
to READ, network and share resources to help them grow.
They must be creators of content, designers of digital
devices and Apps to make a difference and a change
in the perceptions created about them by others.
BGM is moving past a movement, it is maturing into a
sentient being for girls and women of color.

Telling a story is the core to sharing information,
to the exchange of ideas and values. For centuries
people of color and culture have used storytelling to
tell their stories. The dynamic must change when sharing
information, it must begin to be interactive and
engaging to reach the youth that are changing the world.
Black Girl Magic opens new opportunities for growth
with video to allow girls and women of color and
culture to leap over those that are
not supporting their growth and smashing
the glass ceilings above them.

black-lives-matter-2

Resources:
Black Enterprise Mobile
Matthew Cherry on Twitter
@matthewcherry
“Using Mobile Film Making
to Tell Stories,” 4/20/16
in Black Enterprise Mobile
story by Kali Wilder

#BITTechTalk Ep. #101
Sherrell Dorsey – Founder of ThePLUG
https://www.blacksintechnology.net/bittechtalk-ep-101-w-sherrell-dorsey-founder-theplug/

Blacks In Technology
https://www.blacksintechnology.net/

 

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: