My Quest To Teach

August 31, 2016

Books for Parents Raising a Black Male Child

Books for Parents Raising a Black Male Child
by William Jackson, M.Ed.
#MyQuestToTeach

IT-WAS-NEVER-ABOUT-A-HOT-DOG-AND-A-COKE (1)

This is a new school year and Donald Trump has
made very demeaning comments, he has “challenged”
people of color and culture in their behaviors, actions
and raising their families. He has said people of color
and culture are poor, uneducated and unemployable.

The best way to battle this is through educating
our children and future generations. Reading,
literacy, comprehension and a love of learning
are valuable to children of color and culture.
Having parents that are involved and engaged
just as equally important.

I’m sharing a list of books that I hope are
encouraging and worth sharing.
The books selected inspire, challenge, confuse and
stimulate the minds and hearts of parents raising boys
in this society. Encourage reading in your home,
encourage academics in your home and encourage
positive behaviors and working to success.

Please share this list with others that are working hard
in raising youth, teens and young adults to be men.

These are just resources, I do not personally endorse
any just providing a resource for help as a teacher
and a parent.

There are no pictures because I hope you and your
children will be inspired to research them together to
find the best fit for them to read. Not every book
fits every child, but there are books for every child.

natalie 2

Books……………
Mixed Me! October 6, 2015
by Taye Diggs (Author), Shane W. Evans (Illustrator)

Chocolate Me! October 6, 2015
by Taye Diggs  (Author), Shane W. Evans (Illustrator)

A Black Parent’s Handbook to Educating Your Children
(Outside of the Classroom) by Baruti K. Kafele

A Hand to Guide Me by Denzel Washington

Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful
African American Males by Freeman A. Hrabowski,
Kenneth I. Maton, and Geoffrey L. Greif

Cooked: From the Streets to the Stove, from Cocaine
to Foie Gras by Jeff Henderson

How to Get Out of Debt: Get an a Credit Rating for
Free Using the System I’ve Used Successfully With
Thousands of Clients by Harrine Freeman

Kill Them Before They Grow: Misdiagnosis of African
American Boys in American Classrooms
by Michael Porter

Letters to Young Brothers by Hill Harper

Morning by Morning: How We Home-Schooled
Our African-American Sons to the Ivy League
by Paula Penn-Nabrit

Keeping Black Boys Out of Special Education
by Jawanza Kunjufu

Raising Black Boys by Jawanza Kunjufu

Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of
Boys by Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson

Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths
of Boyhood by William Pollack and Mary Pipher

Saving Our Sons by Marita Golden

Introducing

Marvelous Me: Inside and Out (All about Me)
September 1, 2002 by Lisa Bullard  (Author),
Brandon Reibeling (Illustrator)

Daddy Calls Me Man (Richard Jackson Books
(Orchard) September 1, 2000
by Angela Johnson  (Author), Rhonda Mitchell
(Illustrator)

Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story from
the Underground Railroad Hardcover
January 1, 2007 by Ellen Levine  (Author),
Kadir Nelson (Illustrator)

Malcolm Little: The Boy Who Grew Up to
Become Malcolm X Hardcover
January 7, 2014 by Ilyasah Shabazz  (Author),
AG Ford (Illustrator)

20160615_102131_001

I Love My Hair! Board book
November, 2003 by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley
(Author)

I Like Myself! Hardcover  May 1, 2004
by Karen Beaumont  (Author),
David Catrow (Illustrator)

Single Mamahood: Advice and Wisdom for the
African-American Single Mother by Kelly Williams

Stickin’ To, Watchin’ Over, and Gettin’ With:
An African American Parent’s Guide to Discipline
by Howard Stevenson, Gwendolyn Davis &
Saburah Abdul-Kabir

Strength for Their Journey:
5 Essential Disciplines African-American
Parents Must Teach Their Children and Teens
by Robert L. Johnson & Paulette Stanford

Tapping the Power Within:
A Path to Self-Empowerment for Women
by Iyanla Vanzant

The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life
by Kevin Powell

The Bond: Three Young Men Learn to Forgive
and Reconnect with Their Fathers by Sampson
Davis, Rameck Hunt & George Jenkins

The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise
and Fulfill a Dream by Sampson Davis,
George Jenkins, Rameck Hunt, and Remeck Hunt

what 3

The Pursuit of Happyness by Chris Gardner

The Single Mom’s Little Book of Wisdom
by Cassandra Mack

The Warrior Method: A Parents’ Guide to Rearing
Healthy Black Boys by Raymond Winbush

Yesterday, I Cried: Celebrating the Lessons of Living
and Loving by Iyanla Vanzant

Being a Black Man: At the Corner of Progress and Peril
by Kevin Merida

Black Pain: It Just Looks Like We’re Not Hurting
by Terrie Williams

Boys Adrift: The Five Factors Driving the Growing
Epidemic of Unmotivated Boys and Underachieving
Young Men by Leonard Sax

Boys into Men: Raising Our African American Teenage
Sons by Nancy Boyd-Franklin, Pamela A. Toussaint,
and A. J. Franklin

101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know
by LaMarr Darnell Shields

Over 200 Books for and about
People of Color and Culture
Video created by William Jackson
#MyQuestToTeach

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June 8, 2016

My Quest To Teach Presentations

“My Quest To Teach”
Providing Presentations

My educational journey through parenthood, teaching,
mentoring, volunteering and community activism.
“My Quest” to provide valuable and transformative
opportunities to youth, teens and young adults.

290982

Willliam Jackson
Florida State Attorney’s Office
Preventing Crime In The Black
Community Conference
May 2016
PCITBC http://preventblackcrime.com/

Need a speaker on #SocialMedia Safety,
Preventing Bullying and Cyberbullying
The value and empowerment of STEAM / STEM
william.jackson@ewc.edu

 

June 20, 2015

Attending Blogging While Brown Conference in Austin, Texas

Monday, June 22nd 2015
Even though the conference is over I still feel it is important to share
the information that I gained from Blogging While Brown.
This week will be dedicated to showing pictures, video and links
to the wonderful and talented Bloggers, Microbloggers, Vbloggers,
Podcasters and others that are creating awesome, engaging and
transformative content.
I’m going to update this page, not delete anything from it at the content
expands. I hope it contains useful and beneficial information.
Wm Jackson

—————————————————————————————————–
Saturday, June 21st 2015
My Instagram Journey
– Edited
https://instagram.com/WilliamDJackson
Attending Blogging While Brown has been a blessing not just from the information
that I gained to support my efforts to improve my ability in creating content, it has
been a paradigm changer to help me to inspire my students either on the elementary
level and on the college level. The dynamic opportunities particularly for young ladies,
to show them through photos and video that the Black and Brown colors of the rainbow
are beautiful, powerful, intelligent, intellectual and creating a paradigm shift in how the
world sees Women of Color. Women of color are the growing content creators of the
21st century because of their interactions with family, friends, careers, children, life
experiences and other elements of life.

Natural hair, to kinky hair, to weave, to curly, to straight, it is a unique and creative story
of not just a story of hair, it is a story of strength, growth, maturity, pride, accountability
and responsibility. Young girls of color not only need to see the women attending Blogging
While Brown they need to learn their stories, learn how to overcome adversity. Blogging,
Vblogging, Podcasting are tools and platforms to make progressive and transformative change.

Young men of color need to see how technology can elevate them from their struggles and
give them a voice that can potentially reach thousands in a few  hours or days. Young
men of color can tell their stories through text, video and audio, not allowing mainstream
news to put a “spin or a lie” on telling perceptive truths, half truths or just using news bites
or snippets to shape and mold stories.

Each of us has a story and we should not allow others to tell our individual or
cultural stories when the platforms and tools of Social Media are available.
Don’t allow others to tell your story like you can tell your story.

A Blogging While Brown journey from a Black man that is a parent, educator,
content creator, and a Christian
My Instagram Journey

I would love to speak to educational institutions, churches and groups
that work with youth, teens, young adults about the importance of Social Media
content and how it relates/influences  employment, internships, scholarships,
law enforcement profiling, etc. 904 701 4957 – williamderekjackson@gmail.com

20150619_084250 BWB
Bloggers

Blogging While Brown Conference
https://www.facebook.com/groups/2015BloggingWhileBrown/

Learning how to take my blogging and content creation from a hobby
to a business. Black bloggers and bloggers of color (men and women)
need to learn that “You cannot build a empire on free stuff..”

Bloggers and content creators must understand,
“You have to have a business mentality not just a blogger and
content creation mentality.” Lamar Tyler BMWK

More To Come:……………


AUSTIN, TEXAS………………………
My tour of Austin, Texas…. as I attended the conference these are photos from my
walks around Austin,  Texas. Very friendly walking areas with paths, trails and sidewalks.
Photobucket:
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/Touring%20Austin%20Texas%202015/story

More to come…………

June 5, 2015

Black Fathers are the “Gap in the Bookshelf”

Black Fathers are the “Gap in the Bookshelf”
by William Jackson, Prof. Edward Waters College

The importance of reading and comprehension can never be
diminished, the power of independent thought, imagination and
vision is a powerful quality of personal growth and development.
The memories of sacrifices from beatings, torture and even
death has vanished from the minds of too many Blacks that through
generations are lead in the wrong direction by and of assimilation
and association that are literally killing generations of Black youth.

The “Bookshelf of Life” is important because Black children need to
learn who they are, their great potential, and where they come from
to guide where they are going.
The importance of Black fathers to teach this is so valuable that each
generation that does not have a connection with their fathers is being
lost in a world of assimilation and association that is leading Black
children to places they should not go. Fathers are the “Gap in the
Bookshelf” for their children when fathers are not present.
Fathers fill a gap that only a father can.

Chinua Achege

The words of Chinua Achebe ring true in 2015 stated, “adults and
children are forgetting the continuity of the generations remember the
past sacrifices so you can grow beyond just surviving.”
Black parents must teach their children and their grandchildren
the power of education, this education must come from home first if
Black children are too respect learning and the architects which are
the teachers of schools.
Blacks must understand as was stated by Achebe; “Blacks cannot
put themselves in white’s shoes and live their lives. There will be no
change unless Blacks put themselves in positions to learn and gain
education that allows them to compete even on an uneven playing field.”
Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian author that was known and honored as the
foundation of Nigerian literature from his books, poems and diverse
writings. As a parent, educator, and Black man I see many of the similarities
that Blacks have and are experiencing that have happened in Nigeria,
South Africa and other areas of Africa from colonization and Apartied.

Blacks that deny the cultural heritage and acceptance of African ancestry
are destroying their foundation as a people and are slowly being assimilated
into a culture that is still racist and refuses in many ways to truly accept people
of color. Yes there is a Black President, look at the attacks he faces from those
who do not even honor the position of President of the United States of America.

“Every generation must recognize and embrace the task it is peculiarly
designed by history and by providence to perform.” Chinua Achebe

Black homes should be cradling and setting their homes on a foundation
of reading and comprehension. Not the accumulation of things that diminish
in time and have no value after several months. These commodities are
temporary and will be used and destroyed or replaced over time by the newest
model that is put on the shelves of stores. Black homes should be filled with
books and Black children as Achebe states “children should be fascinated by
books.” Even Malcolm X as controversial as he still is exclaimed the value of
learning, reading and cultural respect and understanding.

The power of reading allows children to see themselves as human beings and
not the fodder of violence, hopelessness and self-destruction that the media
and entertainment industry project them as. There are two ways that Blacks
can change their direction in life from my opinion; living in this multicultural
society change will only come when Blacks accept education as the foundation
of cultural growth in this society. Sharing the successes of past and current
Blacks; Black communities should sit down with each other first to solve their
cultural and community problems. Achebe having lived through colonization and
the fight for independence through wars and upheaval wisely states that
“we should not carry the baggage of race and racism into the 21st century.”

The issue of race and racism is rampant in the Black community itself, it is
being denied and ignored, termed “Colorism.” These feelings and self destructive
actions must stop because it will continue to destroy Blacks from within,
like a cancer that festers and grows to a point where even surgery will not save
a people. Just as there are in life many types of cancers the same applies to the
ills of Blacks. Blacks must change their thinking on a wide scale, not allowing
jealousy and fear to aid in the growth of cultural hate. Parents in Black
communities must understand that they are the foundation for their Black
children so must examine their foundations and change them in order to help
their children to be better than they are.

Blacks cannot wait for a President to make changes for them, they cannot
wait for the government to make changes and they cannot wait for churches
to make changes. The change must be a priority through the value of learning,
growth and unity. Too many Black children believe they are not important and
feel they are intellectually inferior. One reason is because they lack the
knowledge of past successes of Blacks throughout history. Achebe has stated
in a quote that when people control what you think they control who you are
and what you may become.
Chinua Achebe “…mediocrity destroys the very fabric of a country as surely
as a war — ushering in all sorts of banality, ineptitude, corruption and debauchery,”
and Black parents in this age of technology and learning cannot accept mediocrity
in their children. What story will be told of their lives and their children, will it be
of academic success or societal dependence on welfare, EBT cards and food
handouts and how many times our Black boys and men have been in jail.

Achebe states: “Storytellers are a threat. They threaten all champions of control,
they frighten usurpers of the right-to-freedom of the human spirit — in state,
in church or mosque, in party congress, in the university or wherever.”
There need to be more Black bloggers especially men to tell their stories
and share their experiences.

Parents must provide an atmosphere of greatness, high self-esteem and
self worth. Who else can on a daily mission tell their beautiful and intelligent
children that they are important, they are intelligent and can be successful!!
As an educator having struggled myself with reading at a young age, I now
embrace books, I try to share the empowerment of learning and the importance
of reading with all my students both in elementary and the college environment.
Parents need to look carefully at the stories; content their children are reading
and exposed too. Encourage literature that ignites a fire to learn in their babies.
Black children’s minds are like blank parchments or blank paper waiting for
the colors, texts, photos that guide their thinking and even influence their
feelings to be placed on the paper of memories. Poverty has and continues to
embrace Black communities, not because there are no jobs, but because Blacks
are not prepared for new jobs in areas like STEAM / STEM Science Technology
Engineering Arts Mathematics this must change in the Black community.

Assimilation and association cannot be continued because those being assimilated
loose their attempt to be something they are not. Black fathers are a foundation,
they are role models, they should be held accountable. Blacks must learn other
cultures cannot put value on their lives or their children’s lives. So Blacks must
empower themselves to grow out of poverty, oppression, political weakness and
economic despair.
Blacks must be able to learn from the society they live in, but cannot afford to lose
their cultural traditions that engage reading and comprehension. Many will
disagree with me, but truth be told #BlackLivesMatter and education makes
Black Lives Matter More…..

The power of literature:
Toni Morrison Reads “English and the African Writer” by Chinua Achebe
http://72.10.54.216/viewmedia.php/prmMID/2598/prmID/1984

Books Black Children Should Read
This is a growing picture listing of books that I find in libraries,
book stores, and other places that I travel. I hope you find some
titles that will inspire your children no matter what color or culture
they are………..
Slide Show
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/slideshow/Books

Story
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/Books/story

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