My Quest To Teach

August 14, 2016

Women of Color and Culture -Making History Making Noise in the Olympics

Women of Color and Culture -Making History Making Noise in the Olympics

‏@BritniDWrites
@EBONYMag;
“This win hopefully brings
hope and change to some
of the issues going on.”

#BeingABlackGirlIsLit esp. in #RIO

When was the last time African Americans,
Haitians, Hispanics, and other people of
color and culture were brought together
and celebrated their diversity?

When President Obama was sworn in as the
First African American President people
cheered and celebrated. They celebrated
being Black, they celebrated being
Brown, they celebrated being African.
They celebrated their color and culture.
When Mayor Alvin Brown was elected the
first African American Mayor of Jacksonville,
Florida African Americans celebrated.


EBONY MAGAZINE
‏@EBONYMag
“While cheering on
#SimoneManuel,
can’t forget that
racism kept Blacks
from learning to swim”

History is being made by women of color
and culture and heritage, they made not
just Olympic history, they have made history
that will span time and space. Parents will
name their daughters every imaginable
combination and some will even try to name
their sons as well.

This is not an exaggeration because people
will talk about where they were, who they
were with and how inspired they were when
our women of color and culture won gold,
silver and bronze. Tears flowed, hugs were
given, cultural pride that was thought
lost swelling.

This is not only a time to celebrate, but
a time to teach and re-awaken the need for
homes of color and culture to teach their
children about their heritage. To celebrate
the melanin in their skin, to celebrate
their hair as Natalie Griffin does in
#MoxieGirl to embrace their shades of
greatness and beauty that they have.


Girls and boys
can celebrate
because they do
matter, they can
make a change
and they are

powerful in great ways. Their
color is not a disability, but an opportunity
to re-awaken in them their drive and desire
for success and celebrate the elders that
sacrificed their very lives so we can rise
beyond our wildest expectations and continue
to rise, breaking class ceilings that
are put in place by people that fear people
of color and culture for their untapped
talents and abilities.
The opportunity to smash mirrors of self
doubt, self hate, and low self esteem.

“Cause I’m a woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal
woman, That’s me.” M. Angelou


Rise, rise, rise
and continue
to rise, not
just in sports,
but in academics.
Don’t let the

celebrations stop here, continue them
as schools start. Celebrate academic
achievements as well.
Thank you to my sister T’Keyah Crystal Keymáh
‏@tkeyahcrystal – http://www.tkeyah.com/
#DeltaSigmaTheta
for showing these great images that I use
in this blog to bring attention to
these wonderfully talented Olympic women.

Mass media has too many times painted
a picture that women of color are second
class to others of lighter european
complexion, they are not as intelligent
or as talented. These Olympics and other
events not just sports in nature have
shown that women of color and culture
are talented, intelligent, creative,
innovative and powerful.

“This is for
all who… will
come after
who believe
they can’t do it.”
Simone Manuel

This is the perfect
opportunity to
make sure our
toddlers, children,

youth, teens,
and young to adult women know that they
are loved, supported and appreciated.
What more motivation than to share the
triumphs of our Olympians to celebrate
their accomplishments through the
sacrifices of hard work, dedication,
discipline, commitment and professionalism.

It takes a village to make sure our
innovators and smart creatives are
growing in the direction they need
to be. People of color and culture
we can celebrate today, but the future
we need to make sure our children of
color and culture are celebrated for
their academic accomplishments
through all levels of education.

Teachers need
to have these
images in their
classrooms to
motivate all
their  children,
especially their
children of color
and culture to
motivate them,

to inspire them and to ignite them
in body and spirit. Imagine how
our students could excel if they have
the support like these Olympians,
imagine if our young creatives are
cheered for their academic successes
during the 180 days of instruction.
Imagine our children that struggle
and have IEP’s are given the support
and attention as the athletes we
celebrate. IMAGINE…..

Building Olympians takes determination,
it takes sacrifice, it takes having
a dream and a support system. Parents
of color and culture need to learn
from these lessons and importantly
apply them to their children as the
school year begins. Work with
teachers as coaches work with their
athletes.

The Olympics
is more than
a feel good
opportunity it
is a window to

what children of color and culture can
accomplish if given support and not
judged, mocked, ridiculed. Children
of color and cultures accomplishments
are not based on zip code, area code
and if they receive free or
reduced lunch. That should not
matter, only that they are capable and able.

Begin to look at all our children of
color and culture as Olympians,
treat them as winners and cover
them in prayer.


Resources
used for this blog:

Black Olympians to Watch
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/black-olympians-watch-rio-2016-competitions-n622401

Senior Digital Editor @EBONYMag
https://twitter.com/BritniDWrites

Simone Manuel – #SimoneManuel
@simone_manuel

Simone Biles – #SimoneBiles
@Simone_Biles

Gabby Douglas – #GabbyDouglas

Black Girl Magic – #BlackGirlMagic

Naomy Grand’Pierre
@NaomyHope
First Haitian Olympic Swimmer

HaitianAmerican ‏- @HACSONET
Team Haiti #TeamHaiti

Being A Black Girl Is Lit
#BeingABlackGirlIsLit

Delta Sigma Theta
#DeltaSigmaTheta

BlackGirlGeeks – @BlackGirlGeeks

BlackGirlMagic – #BlackGirlMagic

Ibtihaj Muhammad Verified
@IbtihajMuhammad

4a 12 3a 1a

8 11

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June 16, 2016

A Spiritual Guide for Fathers Raising Children Part II

A Spiritual Guide for Fathers Raising Children Part II

images

In the spirit of fatherhood, unity and solidarity for parenting,
suggestions  for fathers to be better fathers.

1. Fathers, as children grow they become less dependent
on parents, starting to make decisions for themselves,
men/fathers must stay active as models and advisors.
Often just listening and being patient providing support
and encouragement is what children need as they mature.

2. Fathers, during adolescence and teen years there is a
minimal tendency to ask parents for their opinions, it is
important to ask questions and openly communicate
not criticize. Fathers are prone to be impatient, learn
to wait and guide talks not force them.

3. Fathers, be direct with your decisions and be Fair,
a “No” means “No”. You send conflicting signals when
you change your mind and don’t backup your words
with loving and consistent direction and decisions.

4. Fathers , teens speak in different languages,
don’t be surprised to hear, “Everyone else is doing it”
or “There parents are cool” or “I wish you were like
such and such parents”. Fathers should not be angry
with their children, remember they just want their
way just like we did at their age or still do now.
Learn your children’s language so you can
communicate better.

5. Fathers, parents must stand united. Not trying
to be your children’s friend. Don’t let your child
pit you and your spouse or girl-friend, partner
against each other.
Always be in accord with your children’s decisions.
It is harder for step-parents and those not married,
both need to work hard to keep peace and unity.
Communication is important, it is not about
winning, it is about solidarity and
what is best for the children.

6. Fathers, don’t argue with your children. You
are the parent, the adult, not their equal or
their peer. Remember who is in accountable.
Fathers must at times be firm and unmovable
in their decisions, but show love and wisdom
in their decisions.

7. Fathers, try to initiate a discussion and not
interrogate, use opportunities to talk about
everyday things, how was their school day,
how are their friends, what has
been on their minds. Being proactive is better
than reactive.

8. Fathers should be positive, think positive
and reinforce good behavior and always be in
prayer. Setting realistic and positive expectations
for their children and helping them to make
good decisions.

9. Fathers, remember we all make mistakes.
Children learn by their experiences and
mistakes. Fathers at times need to “tell stories”
to relate information.
Bill Cosby was very effective in doing this.
Men can guide and make suggestions
or provide solutions through stories. Jesus
used parables and our elders
told stories that share ideas and explain relationships.

10. Fathers should not be scared to admit
they make mistakes and apologize for them.
If you want your sons to “man up” you need
to “man up” too.

11. Mothers sometimes need to back off if they
want the father to be consistent.
Remember a nagging woman can kill a spirit
and create dissension in the spirit
of the man and their sons. Nothing spoils trust
faster than embarrassing or going
against a fathers decisions or criticizing the
father in front of the children.

12. Fathers should Pray and not Faint. Have a
mentor that is in-line with God’s Word.
Your mentor does not have to agree with you
all the time, they should be honest all the time.

13. Fathers, attend Church, Bible Study, Prayer
Breakfasts, etc. as a family or
with dad. There are many churches that invite
dads and their children. Fathers
take advantage of this and get involved.

14. Fathers,, have family time at least once a week.

15. Mothers need to pray for their children’s
father even if they are not in the home.
A praying mother is powerful and purposeful
in strengthening her family and
creating calm and peace. A woman that has
a serpents tongue creates chaos,
confusion and division. .

16. Fathers be patient and discipline with
love not anger. Remember how you
were at your children’s and guide your
discipline with peaceful wisdom,
.calm demeanor and a listening ear.

290982

William Jackson, M.Ed. can be reached at the
following email address:
William.Jackson@ewc.edu     on Twitter @wmjackson

Fatherhood Inspirational Video via @wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach
https://youtu.be/goWvUjFnBBI

GetConnectedDad online resources
@GetConnectDad

Great resource for fathers online
https://getconnectdad.com/2016/06/04/52-traits-we-want-in-our-kids-2/

National Fatherhood Initiative
http://facebook.com/nationalfatherhoodiniative
Twitter @thefatherfactor

June 10, 2016

Preventing Crime In The Black Community

Preventing Crime In The Black Community
20160527_093904_001  20160527_163635
A video presentation with Malik Yoba and William Jackson
Sharing information to the youth, teens and young adults
attending this conference that is 31 years young and
still growing.
Preventing Crime In The Black Community Conference is expanding
the lives of children of color and culture through leaders in
industry, education, technology and medicine.

Malik Yoba is an actor and director.

William Jackson is an educator, blogger and parent.

May 26, 2016

Girls and Bullying: Pain and Potential PTSD

Girls and Bullying: Pain and Potential PTSD
William Jackson, M.Ed.
Edward Waters College
@wmjackson – william.jackson@ewc.edu

5

Girls of all ages are involved in online
communication that has exceeded face to face
communication. They are sharing photos, videos,
emoji’s and other graphical displays of emotions
and friendships. BFF is a new word in the English
language.
The increase of a girl’s social life has transitioned
to digital relationships that travel across the
digital languages of Social Media sites.

Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter and other
forms of digital communications are dominated by
the chatter of digital words, phrases, acronyms
and the occasional use of profanity and sexual
dialogue. A girl or young ladies digital life is
different than how they are in real life situations.

Direct interaction creates opportunities for
dialogue that can be respectful and caring. Technology
has opened a Pandora’s Box to potential vicious Bullying,
Cyberbullying, Cyberstalking and Sexting. These actions
have created a change in digital interactions and
etiquette. It is dangerous not to know what
Cyberbullying and Cyberstalking are.

Girls must be taught how to “talk” digitally to each
other and not to bully, or in the case of technology
Cyberbully. Brooklyn a student says that, “Parents
need to observe their child’s accounts to see what
they are doing to keep their children especially girls
safe from predators and others that would do them harm.”

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The end of each school year is creating fear,
apprehension and even causing parents pulling their
children out of school early because of fear from
violence as retribution of past offenses even if it is
a minor verbal altercation or a digital misunderstanding.
Too many children and teens do not value life as it
should be valued and their natures are more violent and
less compassionate. Communication with wireless devices
has created a paradigm shift for parents, educators, and
even law enforcement in the attempts to monitor, educate
and prevent bullying actions by girls and women.

Statistics show that girls will bully using technology
more than boys and a girl’s online activity is more
vicious. Even television media has shown true to life
movies about girls bullying in the traditional sense in
the school environment and also through digital means.
The unfortunate deaths by suicide and attempted suicides
are reported weekly on national news stations that bullying
and cyberbullying creates havoc emotionally and
psychologically for girls. Girls as they mature into
women have stated that they suffer from PTSD because of
the stress resulting from bullying through middle and high
school.

Speaking at national conferences to teens and young adults,
I have spoken with women in their 30’s and 40’s that carry
the emotional scars of bullying from middle and high school.
The reality that many parents do not understand or are in
denial, girls are more likely than boys to participate in
cyberbullying, (cyber-bullying via text messages or online
via Internet).

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Sharing information to empower and engage parents as the
school year comes to a close, parents need to check their
children’s Social Media accounts and their digital devices.
Parents need to understand their children, who their friends
are and even associates. The recent deaths of girls from
fights have made national attention and a warning sign to
parents. It cannot be said that this is a surprise because
there are signs, parents need to recognize them.

Schools cannot be fully blamed for bullying, because at
the end of the day, students go home to their parents,
seclude themselves in their rooms and use their digital
devices to make the lives of other girls and even boys hell
on Social Media. Parents are accountable and responsible
because they are paying for the very devices their children
are using to bully with.

The consequences of bullying do have serious emotional
and psychological consequences that can last a lifetime.
Girls who are bullied have a greater risk for depression
which can lead to drug dependency, alcohol and other
substances. As a teacher in elementary and higher education
here are some tips that may help protect kids from
cyberbullying, but it takes parents being active, engaged
and involved.

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Reinforce in your children not to give out personal
information online, when engaged in online don’t fill in
personal information. In online profiles, chat rooms, blogs,
or on web site surveys be careful what personal information
you provide. Not all sites are honest and beneficial.Don’t
ever tell anyone your email or instant messaging passwords,
even your friends or BFF’s.

If someone sends a mean or threatening message, don’t
respond, get a screen capture and save it to report to
school administration or law enforcement. Don’t be a
cyberbully, because you may find yourself on the other
end of being investigated by law enforcement and school
officials. Laws are enforced where all digital devices can
be taken from the home and searched for “evidence” for
cyberbullying.

Knowing the definition of bullying and cyberbullying is not
enough, knowing that anyone can be a bully or can be bullied
is important. Prevention and protection is the goal of my
blog, to empower and educate parents. Parents need to read
student policy and procedure books, they need to read
Internet policies for the school district.
The end of the school year should be a calm transition,
not one filled with dread for the summer,
fearing being bullied, harassed and stalked.

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