My Quest To Teach

April 25, 2018

2018 A Time To Blog In Africa – Develop Your Brand Part 1

Africa

2018 A Time To Blog In Africa – Develop Your Brand Part 1
by Prof. William Jackson  @wmjackson

Digital content creation is prevalent on the web, an increase in
blogging, microblogging, podcasting and other forms of digital
media is expanding across the Internet. Africa is no longer a
developing continent, this great continent is made up of 54
nations is making a presence that is being felt globally.
The evolution of technology has opened opportunities for
Africans to tell their stories, spreading their entrepreneurial
wings and expand their networks from local to global.
Bill Gates, 1996 “Content Is King” The evolution of Blogging
can be seen in the increase of content that has a wide range
of subject matter and relevancy to life experiences
of the writer.
The importance of Blogging and use of Social Media can be
seen in the engagement,  connectivity and networking,
individuals are becoming forces that are rivaling traditional
news media. Because there is growing content that easily
crosses time zones and international borders the effects of
blogging is seen in education, business, finance,
commerce, and development in political arenas.
There are no barriers that would delay the posting of content
even by age or gender.
Students of all levels are creating content based on their
learning experiences and developing their Brands. This
explosion of digital content has created a challenge in
determining what is important to read and what to discard.
The “Elements of Blogging” and the “Significance of Content
Creation” is an area that must be addressed. Workshops,
seminars and conferences are available now
to help people and businesses create worthwhile content
to market their services and products. No matter the
purpose of Blogging the ultimate goal is to have people
“View or Hear” what is written or broadcast.
Certain criteria must be thought of and used as a gauge
to help Bloggers in their quest to develop content that
pleads to be read and interacted upon. In education
you have Objectives, in business you have Agendas, and
other areas have their own design.
Part 2 9 Strategies to consider in your blogging journey

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April 23, 2018

African Cultural Awareness and Diversification Extravaganza 

Filed under: #Africa,Education — William Jackson @ 11:43
Tags: , , , ,


Photo
African Cultural Awareness and Diversification Extravaganza
by William Jackson and Aida Correa  My Quest To Teach
#MyQuestToTeach #LoveBuiltLife
Je Vais Ventures – https://www.facebook.com/jevaisventures/

The continent of Africa is still misunderstood, misinterpreted
and mistreated.
It’s people have too many times been demeaned and portrayed
as savages,  uneducated, impoverished and unable to govern
themselves.
There are so many misconceptions even from the TED Talk “The
Danger of a Single Story” by  Novelist Chimamanda Adichie that
there is false information and equally false perceptions about
the people and history of Africa. https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story

The facts are that Africa had the first universities that people
traveled to and studied. Christianity has been a solid religion along
with Islam for centuries.
Trade and commerce were being conducted by land routes and
by sea routes centuries before Europeans thrust their influence
through violence and gunpowder.
Architecture, engineers, science and medical research where
ongoing centuries before European influences and colonialism.
Concepts of STEM and STEAM were already implemented in African
society and the integration of the Arts was begun before the current
understanding that STEM Science Technology
Engineering Math are valuable.
The major influences of the Arts can be found from the origination of
African developments. STEAM has an infrastructure that is based on
African influences.
The Cultural Awareness and Diversification Extravaganza showed
that the continent of Africa is rich in natural resources, rich in cultural
diversity, vibrant with educational growth, abundantly influential
globally not because of the natural resources, but because of its
people also.
Represented at the Extravaganza is knowledge, music, dance and
fashion that shows the side of Africa that many media elements do
not and refuse to show. The greatness of Africa should be highlighted
like any American, European or Asian people.
The history is vast across the centuries, so important this knowledge
and transformative that Europeans have tried to hide the facts,
minimize the talents and abilities of Africans in many areas. Because
of Africa we enjoy the treasure and riches from that continent,
people of color and cultures should not allow traditional media to
show only one picture, one vision and one bias of a continent that
make the United States minuscule in comparison.
Information is powerful, but applied information is transformative,
that is why the continent of Africa must be seen in its brilliance
and the people as agents of change in education,
commerce, industry, technology, science, medicine and other areas
that show the growth of this magnificent continent.
The Cultural Awareness and Diversification Extravaganza, created
by Jemimma Mumphrey is just the first of many that will feature:
an African Fashion Show, African Dance, African Drum Beating,
African Poetry and Spoken Word, Taste of Africa, African Vendor
Displays and much more.
To many times the media has not shown Africa as a productive,
progressive investment for the future of the world. The mentality
must change and so must the mental acceptance of people of color.
It is up to people of color to change the narrative of Africa and
the historical significance of this mother continent.

William Jackson, Jemimma Mumphrey, Aida Correa

William Jackson Jemimma Mumphrey  Aida Correa.jpg

November 17, 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness
William Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
Sponsor of WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017
The recent WordCamp Nairobi and other tech venues
that are hosting technology conferences, workshops,
meetups and supporting entrepreneurs and I-trepreneurs
are growing in Africa. Tech is becoming common place.
Being dope on Social Media is not a cultural thing, it is
the ability to be comfortable in your digital skin as a
content creator, digital creator, innovator, graphic artist
or even a dope web developer. Everyone has a dope
side to them, it just takes time to discover it and
importantly apply that dopeness to a positive online
experience.
It means that it is ok to have fun on the web and to
integrate yourself into your product or service even on
a digital level. Too many people lose the excitement of
creating content that will be read, viewed, studied,
listened to and watched. Audiences change as access
and platforms change, so why not be Dope and Lit,
providing something that brings people to you and
influence community activist and activism?
SEO even in Africa – Search Engine Optimization is not
always the ticket, WOM or Word of Mouth is still important
and should always be a viable strategy to build followers.
Search Engine Optimization is tech based, but
technology cannot always bring readers. Building
relationships and collaborations are the keys.
Africans are expanding their presence and their ability
to create dynamic digital content.
As a parent, educator, blogger, mentor, community
activist and STEAM Advocate and proud sponsor for
WordCamp Nairobi, Kenya here are my 21 Reasons
African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

Nairobi Conference
1. To attract diverse readers and viewers. Being diversified
in your audience is a plus because people connect with
what they like, how it relates to their needs and relevance.
2. Most viewers will be women and they love dope content.
Try not to be boring or repetitive.
3. If you want a broad spectrum of followers dope up your
blog with relevant content and graphics that match your
audience. Diversity is Dope
4. International markets look to promote Dope and Lit
content. They always look for awesome people.
5. If you’re looking to monetize your site and content
expand your dopeness to new markets that embraces
diversity and engagement.
6. Hire dope speakers like myself to talk on your Podcasts.
If you’re having a workshop or conference be very selective
because content has to be dope and exciting.
7. Take plenty of dope photos and videos with dope and lit
people. Use your Instagram and Twitter sites to share and
expand your reach.
8. Speak at WordCamps, BarCamps, EdCamps and other
tech conferences.
9. Always have your business cards available, make sure
there is a dope photo of yourself and have your “elevator
pitch” ready.
10. Hire a dope graphic artist to create your dope logo.
11. Be a sponsor and promoter of community events like
WordCamp as you grow.
12. Join the Chamber of Commerce and other dope
organizations that are invested in the community and city.
13. Be a speaker on talk shows to share your knowledge.
14. Start your own Podcast with guests and be fancy
with your title.
15. See where you can help your church or ministry with their
connectivity.
16. Take a Social Media class yourself.
17. Offer Social Media classes with certificates when completed.
18. Keep your profiles current, relevant and oozzing with dopeness.
19. Take a dope vacation from time to time to encourage
inspiration locally, nationally and internationally.
20. Embrace diversity in your vision and expression.
21. Network – Network – Network
“How To Be Dope On Social Media 2017”
William Jackson Speaking at
WordCamp Wilmington, North Carolina
https://youtu.be/GQup1mEMX-I

January 2, 2017

Africans Are Developing The Art of Writing and Blogging

Africans Are Developing The Art of Writing and Blogging
by William Jackson, M.Ed. @wmjackson
#MyQuestToTeach

“Educators are activists” WordCampNABSE 2016

As an instructor in the College of Education and Urban Studies at
Edward Waters College, the instructional goal is to reach students
to make learning relevant, engaging, fun and helping students to
apply to life not just academic lessons.

Tests do not judge the success of living away from home, tests do
not determine the career success of students, it is a gauge of
academic achievement and growth; there is more to it than just
assessments taken on a computer. This is why engagement,
exposure, hands-on and student lead instruction is vital anywhere
in the world.

Students need to understand the reasons for being a good reader,
why comprehension is important, the value of grammar and the
engagement of networking and collaboration. Accessing videos
from YouTube that contain lessons learned from Chinua Achebe
a Poet, Writer, Mentor, Political and Community Activists;
https://youtu.be/M5OAjnG6rKo involved in the community he
serves and provide a foundation why education is valuable.

The growing TEDX and TEDTALKs allows African across the
diaspora to share their thoughts, dreams, and challenges of a
united and progressive Africa.
It is important to go beyond just interpretation, understanding
and application of speaking, it is important to know how to put
these pieces of education, technology, commerce, trade, natural
resources and build a knowledge based society to use to grow
African communities and empower African children for generations
to come. “African children need to be taught how to be producers
at all levels, not just at the bottom being consumers.”
Prof. Wm Jackson

Stated in the TEDx, “Africa Post-Colonial Development:
Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin” Africa must invest in herself
and not allow foreign countries dictate the priorities of her people.
No foreign country can understand the vision for another country
and make the necessary changes to create generational wealth,
progress and build all around stability.

Nations that do not invest in the growth of their children generational
run the risk to not developing into productive nations with thriving
economies, they rely on foreign investors and fall back into colonized
ideologies and economic slavery. The educational levels of citizens is
one of the important factors that plays into if a nation will be able to be
involved in global trade, technological innovation, the education of its
people and even influence the political stability of that nation.

Africans have a unique vision for change that can be applied to
many African communities across their respective nations. Listening
to writers and activists on YouTube that have influenced not just
thousands, but millions in South Africa, Kenya, Ghana Nigeria and
across the continent of Africa. There are important thought leaders
and entrepreneurs with progressive ideas and skills.

Wole Soyinka and Chinua Achebe share their passions to improving
their nation’s strength in areas of national educational accessibility,
political stability, growth in commerce, the participation in global
trade and applying technology to best serve the poor and underserved.
To effectively engage and empower with education is a key priority as
each generation moves towards entrepreneurship, youth and teens are
developing into smart creatives and technological innovators.

The careers of African societies are no longer just agriculture and
industrial they are progressively being adapted to knowledge application,
tech innovation and research and development. Technology has the
potential to reach millions to provide resources and new opportunities of
learning and workings to provide the necessary things families need.
The discussion of colonization by foreign rule can never stop because the
consequences are still seen today.

Colonization was designed to keep Africans “under” educated, lacking in
political power and even possessing little or no economic foundation to
build wealth and stability.
Africans must continue to apply their passions, abilities and talents to help
their communities growing through education to make transformative
changes using literature, writing, and the integration of technical resources.
“Getting things done is better than having things perfect. Done is better than
perfect. Whatever you have in your hands, get going with it. Just do it.”
Charles Igwe, Nollywood Global Media Group, Nigeria

Resources:
The Importance of Banks and Banking in Africa
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

Bridging the African Diaspora
Bridging the Diaspora Divide – Teresa H. Clarke at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/sg6F-M6v1iM

Africa Post-Colonial Development: Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin
https://youtu.be/s7lmz4UL4wE

Instagram for Ideas Lane Africa
https://www.instagram.com/ideaslaneafrica/

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