My Quest To Teach

November 17, 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness
William Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
Sponsor of WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017
The recent WordCamp Nairobi and other tech venues
that are hosting technology conferences, workshops,
meetups and supporting entrepreneurs and I-trepreneurs
are growing in Africa. Tech is becoming common place.
Being dope on Social Media is not a cultural thing, it is
the ability to be comfortable in your digital skin as a
content creator, digital creator, innovator, graphic artist
or even a dope web developer. Everyone has a dope
side to them, it just takes time to discover it and
importantly apply that dopeness to a positive online
experience.
It means that it is ok to have fun on the web and to
integrate yourself into your product or service even on
a digital level. Too many people lose the excitement of
creating content that will be read, viewed, studied,
listened to and watched. Audiences change as access
and platforms change, so why not be Dope and Lit,
providing something that brings people to you and
influence community activist and activism?
SEO even in Africa – Search Engine Optimization is not
always the ticket, WOM or Word of Mouth is still important
and should always be a viable strategy to build followers.
Search Engine Optimization is tech based, but
technology cannot always bring readers. Building
relationships and collaborations are the keys.
Africans are expanding their presence and their ability
to create dynamic digital content.
As a parent, educator, blogger, mentor, community
activist and STEAM Advocate and proud sponsor for
WordCamp Nairobi, Kenya here are my 21 Reasons
African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

Nairobi Conference
1. To attract diverse readers and viewers. Being diversified
in your audience is a plus because people connect with
what they like, how it relates to their needs and relevance.
2. Most viewers will be women and they love dope content.
Try not to be boring or repetitive.
3. If you want a broad spectrum of followers dope up your
blog with relevant content and graphics that match your
audience. Diversity is Dope
4. International markets look to promote Dope and Lit
content. They always look for awesome people.
5. If you’re looking to monetize your site and content
expand your dopeness to new markets that embraces
diversity and engagement.
6. Hire dope speakers like myself to talk on your Podcasts.
If you’re having a workshop or conference be very selective
because content has to be dope and exciting.
7. Take plenty of dope photos and videos with dope and lit
people. Use your Instagram and Twitter sites to share and
expand your reach.
8. Speak at WordCamps, BarCamps, EdCamps and other
tech conferences.
9. Always have your business cards available, make sure
there is a dope photo of yourself and have your “elevator
pitch” ready.
10. Hire a dope graphic artist to create your dope logo.
11. Be a sponsor and promoter of community events like
WordCamp as you grow.
12. Join the Chamber of Commerce and other dope
organizations that are invested in the community and city.
13. Be a speaker on talk shows to share your knowledge.
14. Start your own Podcast with guests and be fancy
with your title.
15. See where you can help your church or ministry with their
connectivity.
16. Take a Social Media class yourself.
17. Offer Social Media classes with certificates when completed.
18. Keep your profiles current, relevant and oozzing with dopeness.
19. Take a dope vacation from time to time to encourage
inspiration locally, nationally and internationally.
20. Embrace diversity in your vision and expression.
21. Network – Network – Network
“How To Be Dope On Social Media 2017”
William Jackson Speaking at
WordCamp Wilmington, North Carolina
https://youtu.be/GQup1mEMX-I

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January 2, 2017

Africans Are Developing The Art of Writing and Blogging

Africans Are Developing The Art of Writing and Blogging
by William Jackson, M.Ed. @wmjackson
#MyQuestToTeach

“Educators are activists” WordCampNABSE 2016

As an instructor in the College of Education and Urban Studies at
Edward Waters College, the instructional goal is to reach students
to make learning relevant, engaging, fun and helping students to
apply to life not just academic lessons.

Tests do not judge the success of living away from home, tests do
not determine the career success of students, it is a gauge of
academic achievement and growth; there is more to it than just
assessments taken on a computer. This is why engagement,
exposure, hands-on and student lead instruction is vital anywhere
in the world.

Students need to understand the reasons for being a good reader,
why comprehension is important, the value of grammar and the
engagement of networking and collaboration. Accessing videos
from YouTube that contain lessons learned from Chinua Achebe
a Poet, Writer, Mentor, Political and Community Activists;
https://youtu.be/M5OAjnG6rKo involved in the community he
serves and provide a foundation why education is valuable.

The growing TEDX and TEDTALKs allows African across the
diaspora to share their thoughts, dreams, and challenges of a
united and progressive Africa.
It is important to go beyond just interpretation, understanding
and application of speaking, it is important to know how to put
these pieces of education, technology, commerce, trade, natural
resources and build a knowledge based society to use to grow
African communities and empower African children for generations
to come. “African children need to be taught how to be producers
at all levels, not just at the bottom being consumers.”
Prof. Wm Jackson

Stated in the TEDx, “Africa Post-Colonial Development:
Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin” Africa must invest in herself
and not allow foreign countries dictate the priorities of her people.
No foreign country can understand the vision for another country
and make the necessary changes to create generational wealth,
progress and build all around stability.

Nations that do not invest in the growth of their children generational
run the risk to not developing into productive nations with thriving
economies, they rely on foreign investors and fall back into colonized
ideologies and economic slavery. The educational levels of citizens is
one of the important factors that plays into if a nation will be able to be
involved in global trade, technological innovation, the education of its
people and even influence the political stability of that nation.

Africans have a unique vision for change that can be applied to
many African communities across their respective nations. Listening
to writers and activists on YouTube that have influenced not just
thousands, but millions in South Africa, Kenya, Ghana Nigeria and
across the continent of Africa. There are important thought leaders
and entrepreneurs with progressive ideas and skills.

Wole Soyinka and Chinua Achebe share their passions to improving
their nation’s strength in areas of national educational accessibility,
political stability, growth in commerce, the participation in global
trade and applying technology to best serve the poor and underserved.
To effectively engage and empower with education is a key priority as
each generation moves towards entrepreneurship, youth and teens are
developing into smart creatives and technological innovators.

The careers of African societies are no longer just agriculture and
industrial they are progressively being adapted to knowledge application,
tech innovation and research and development. Technology has the
potential to reach millions to provide resources and new opportunities of
learning and workings to provide the necessary things families need.
The discussion of colonization by foreign rule can never stop because the
consequences are still seen today.

Colonization was designed to keep Africans “under” educated, lacking in
political power and even possessing little or no economic foundation to
build wealth and stability.
Africans must continue to apply their passions, abilities and talents to help
their communities growing through education to make transformative
changes using literature, writing, and the integration of technical resources.
“Getting things done is better than having things perfect. Done is better than
perfect. Whatever you have in your hands, get going with it. Just do it.”
Charles Igwe, Nollywood Global Media Group, Nigeria

Resources:
The Importance of Banks and Banking in Africa
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

Bridging the African Diaspora
Bridging the Diaspora Divide – Teresa H. Clarke at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/sg6F-M6v1iM

Africa Post-Colonial Development: Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin
https://youtu.be/s7lmz4UL4wE

Instagram for Ideas Lane Africa
https://www.instagram.com/ideaslaneafrica/

December 30, 2016

Building African Bloggers and Innovators in 2017

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Building African Bloggers and Innovators in 2017
William Jackson, M.Ed.
Twitter @wmjackson – #MyQuestToTeach

“What should we be doing going forward?”
Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
There are millions of potential brother and sister bloggers
in Africa, diverse people of color and culture, yearning to
tell their stories, developing and waiting to share their
Brands and expand their opportunities to collaborate in
education, business,commerce, finance and global
entrepreneurship.
This writing is a contribution of knowledge to share and
hopefully motivate and inspire Africans desiring to Blog,
Microblog,  Videoblog, Podcast and create dynamic content
within their communities. Their (African) voices and stories
are important and should be shared on a global platform of
respect and collaboration on dynamic Social Media platforms.
To represent the African diaspora and historical significance
of the art of storytelling.
What better way than to share with the world, to create unique
content that is just as diverse as the most culturally rich
continent in the world, Africa. I encourage Africans of all ages
to write their stories, to use their creativity to share innovative
ideas and create content that bridges generations and cultures.
The ability to create unique and transformative content that
can connect and unify their continent.

Following the literary talents of Chinua Achebe, Ngugi wa
Thiong’o, Wole Soyinka, Ben Okri, Buchi Emecheta, Ama
Ata Aidoo, Dinaw Mengestu, Africans are historic creators
of stories’, poets, and diverse content creators.
African children are learning that through education
they can contribute to the world in ways not available
decades ago.
Colonialism attempted to silence the voices of Africans,
it failed because the voices of Africans can be heard
whispered on the flowing waters and in the air currents,
stories that travel through the trees, and the paths both
dirt and paved across the continent.
Social Media platforms and tools are allowing African
boys and girls to share their stories with the global
community, bringing attention to their lives right from
their mouths and to the ears of billions globally.

kids

As an educator and parent I want to encourage African
children, teens, youth and young adults to share their
stories through the diverse tools that blogging has to
offer and enhance their language abilities, “language
is the way to memory.”
Prof. Wm Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
Do not allow others to tell your stories as was done
during the centuries of slavery, oppression and
colonization.
In the spirit of Chinua Achebe share your stories and
let the world hear you. Chinua Achebe the “Father of
African Literature” has stated many times that the
minds of the people were influenced by the
colonization of Europeans.
That African writers need to be activist in their
writing, to challenge the thinking of Africans, to
encourage intellectualism and activism even still
today.
The thinking and the writing of Africans are
challenging the “emperors” way of thinking,
“because the storyteller has a different agenda”
than the emperor, “Conversation with
Chinua Achebe 2012.”

shutterstock_128237849-620x350

In many ways Africans have a responsibility to
share their stories and share their voices, what
better way to tell truth to life what Europeans have
tried to deny for decades. There was a denial
of building of thought leaders and intellectuals in
Africa during colonial rule. The independence of
Ghana in 1957 and subsequently other African
countries allowed for the potential of building new
intellectuals that in turn will teach others. Sharing
the value of their voices just as Achebe, Soyinka
and others have done, storytelling is a powerful
tool to build cultural pride and dignity.
The 20th and 21st century have opened new ways
for Africans to soar, to embrace the winds of
change that allow for the chains of colonialism to
dissipate. Achebe shares that Africans have the
right to share their expressions. No matter the
medium, the tools, or the platform.
The encouragement of children is important because
as Achebe says that “children can fly,” and should
be encouraged to.
Achebe states that he writes because he likes to
write, I feel the same passion. To share not just
stories, but information to encourage people to think,
contemplate, dream, consider the possibilities to grow
beyond the limited imaginations of those that
do not respect the diversity and the heritage of African
nations or the diaspora.
Africans must tell their stories, share their voices and
build a new dynamic identity for the 21st century.
Africans are more than a people to be colonized and ruled.
They are a people that have passions, expectations, and
dreams, this should be shared with the world.
African voices can influence geopolitical decisions that
will take Africa into the 22nd century and beyond.
Africans as a collective can influence the gaps in education,
in commerce, in the innovation of technology and the
opportunities to achieve more to the benefits of Africa and
African people, not just people from other countries.
54 countries united to solve their own problems can
achieve great things if they unite and speak united. Africa
united as a strong united force to make positive and
transformative change.
These powerful words from stated that, “no foreigners
have ever developed a country, the nationals have developed
their own country.”
Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

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Resources:
Bridging the Diaspora Divide – Teresa H. Clarke at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/sg6F-M6v1iM

South African Bloggers
http://weblogforlove.com/

Africans can save Africa: Arnold Ekpe at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

African on the Blog
http://www.africaontheblog.com

 

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