My Quest To Teach

April 25, 2018

2018 A Time To Blog In Africa – Develop Your Brand Part 1

Africa

2018 A Time To Blog In Africa – Develop Your Brand Part 1
by Prof. William Jackson  @wmjackson

Digital content creation is prevalent on the web, an increase in
blogging, microblogging, podcasting and other forms of digital
media is expanding across the Internet. Africa is no longer a
developing continent, this great continent is made up of 54
nations is making a presence that is being felt globally.
The evolution of technology has opened opportunities for
Africans to tell their stories, spreading their entrepreneurial
wings and expand their networks from local to global.
Bill Gates, 1996 “Content Is King” The evolution of Blogging
can be seen in the increase of content that has a wide range
of subject matter and relevancy to life experiences
of the writer.
The importance of Blogging and use of Social Media can be
seen in the engagement,  connectivity and networking,
individuals are becoming forces that are rivaling traditional
news media. Because there is growing content that easily
crosses time zones and international borders the effects of
blogging is seen in education, business, finance,
commerce, and development in political arenas.
There are no barriers that would delay the posting of content
even by age or gender.
Students of all levels are creating content based on their
learning experiences and developing their Brands. This
explosion of digital content has created a challenge in
determining what is important to read and what to discard.
The “Elements of Blogging” and the “Significance of Content
Creation” is an area that must be addressed. Workshops,
seminars and conferences are available now
to help people and businesses create worthwhile content
to market their services and products. No matter the
purpose of Blogging the ultimate goal is to have people
“View or Hear” what is written or broadcast.
Certain criteria must be thought of and used as a gauge
to help Bloggers in their quest to develop content that
pleads to be read and interacted upon. In education
you have Objectives, in business you have Agendas, and
other areas have their own design.
Part 2 9 Strategies to consider in your blogging journey

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October 6, 2017

Writing and Storytelling for Africans

Africa

Writing and Storytelling for Africans
by William Jackson, M.Ed. @wmjackson Twitter
Speaker at WordCamp DC, WordCamp Jacksonville,
WordCamp Wilmington N.C.

“Writers have to recognize the works of the artist and
those of the activist. Creating content is more than just
throwing words, video, pictures on a digital sheet of
paper. There is serious intellectual thought during the
writing process. Sometimes writing will be in a zone of
creativity and innovation to create new content that has
an intended outcome, but sometimes the outcomes are
unknown.” William Jackson
Professor Soyinka “Just sit down and write….” as he has
stated to the growing African writers across the continent.
The ability of a blogger / writer to write also means that
they have a responsibility to tell the story of those that
cannot write, those that are silent and have no voice.
Digital content is powerful and enabling to bring recog-
nition, attention and urgency to civic issues that need
to be addressed.
The growth of the blogger / writer is composed of periods
of growth, reconciliation, enlightenment and a civic
responsibility to write / blog not just for oneself, but for
those that do not have a voice and will not be heard.
The ability to share a story comes from the ability to listen
and apply knowledge from a person’s experiences,
interactions, goals for growth and even how mistakes are
made and learned from.
The diversity of culture influences a writer’s ability to
“touch” the people they are writing to or writing for.
When past writers applied their skills they shared stories
that could be connected to real life, to the experiences
that many knew they could connect to.
The diversity of African bloggers represents the diversity of
a continent that influences not just the global weather, but
has digital extensions that influence business, commerce,
entrepreneurial spirits of the dreamers, creators and
innovators that have ideas to change the world around them.
Africa is in a constant state of flux economically, educationally,
culturally and the future is unknown, but it is becoming
brighter and brighter a business and entrepreneurial
opportunities become available.
Writers like author and Professor Wole Soyinka who are
involved in civic issues, governmental policies and the
educational growth of youth, teens and adults. He
is of the past, but there are modern writers waiting
to be read.
The African continent has birthed intellectual and
intelligent writers that have embraced and applied
digital platforms to awaken and encourage others in
the African diaspora to spread their digital wings and
write. The storytellers of the past have grown and adapted
to the Bloggers, Vbloggers, Podcasters, Facebook Live
and Instagram Live visionaries building, creating, designing
and posting content that influences thought not just
emotions.
Stated by Soyinka, “when Africans learn the power they
have in their hands in writing, they can influence their
communities and make important and needed changes
because they will have a voice that others can hear and
follow.”
Writing is a grassroots process that builds knowledge in
Africans of all ages and can influence generations. The
educational process is key because as can be seen in Africa
it is dangerous to allow your colonizers to educate your
children. Their goals are not the goals of those being
oppressed. The goal of the oppressor is the keep the
oppressed ignorant. So that their resources can be drained
dry before the oppressed realize what is happening
to their lands, to their people and their very existence.
Stated by Prof. William Jackson of My Quest to Teach
“If we (Blacks) are not speaking for ourselves or writing
for ourselves, someone else is going to describe who we
are, where we came from and ultimately where we are going.”
This creates identity problems because those that are doing
the writing are not looking through the eyes of those being
written about. The people are not seen as people they are
seen as little things with no value, as Chinua Achebe states,
“as funny things.”
Too many stories are wrong in their direction to offer solutions
to issues that Africans are experiencing. Africans must be able
to tell their own stories because there is a story to tell…..
“Your pen has to be on fire.” Chinua Achebe
Resources:
How many people use social media in Africa?
http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/13/africa/africa-social-media-consumption/
BBC Africa
https://www.youtube.com/user/bbcafrica
10 Best African Speakers
https://www.africa.com/ted-global-2017-meet-the-10-africans-on-the-list-of-speakers/

January 2, 2017

Africans Are Developing The Art of Writing and Blogging

Africans Are Developing The Art of Writing and Blogging
by William Jackson, M.Ed. @wmjackson
#MyQuestToTeach

“Educators are activists” WordCampNABSE 2016

As an instructor in the College of Education and Urban Studies at
Edward Waters College, the instructional goal is to reach students
to make learning relevant, engaging, fun and helping students to
apply to life not just academic lessons.

Tests do not judge the success of living away from home, tests do
not determine the career success of students, it is a gauge of
academic achievement and growth; there is more to it than just
assessments taken on a computer. This is why engagement,
exposure, hands-on and student lead instruction is vital anywhere
in the world.

Students need to understand the reasons for being a good reader,
why comprehension is important, the value of grammar and the
engagement of networking and collaboration. Accessing videos
from YouTube that contain lessons learned from Chinua Achebe
a Poet, Writer, Mentor, Political and Community Activists;
https://youtu.be/M5OAjnG6rKo involved in the community he
serves and provide a foundation why education is valuable.

The growing TEDX and TEDTALKs allows African across the
diaspora to share their thoughts, dreams, and challenges of a
united and progressive Africa.
It is important to go beyond just interpretation, understanding
and application of speaking, it is important to know how to put
these pieces of education, technology, commerce, trade, natural
resources and build a knowledge based society to use to grow
African communities and empower African children for generations
to come. “African children need to be taught how to be producers
at all levels, not just at the bottom being consumers.”
Prof. Wm Jackson

Stated in the TEDx, “Africa Post-Colonial Development:
Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin” Africa must invest in herself
and not allow foreign countries dictate the priorities of her people.
No foreign country can understand the vision for another country
and make the necessary changes to create generational wealth,
progress and build all around stability.

Nations that do not invest in the growth of their children generational
run the risk to not developing into productive nations with thriving
economies, they rely on foreign investors and fall back into colonized
ideologies and economic slavery. The educational levels of citizens is
one of the important factors that plays into if a nation will be able to be
involved in global trade, technological innovation, the education of its
people and even influence the political stability of that nation.

Africans have a unique vision for change that can be applied to
many African communities across their respective nations. Listening
to writers and activists on YouTube that have influenced not just
thousands, but millions in South Africa, Kenya, Ghana Nigeria and
across the continent of Africa. There are important thought leaders
and entrepreneurs with progressive ideas and skills.

Wole Soyinka and Chinua Achebe share their passions to improving
their nation’s strength in areas of national educational accessibility,
political stability, growth in commerce, the participation in global
trade and applying technology to best serve the poor and underserved.
To effectively engage and empower with education is a key priority as
each generation moves towards entrepreneurship, youth and teens are
developing into smart creatives and technological innovators.

The careers of African societies are no longer just agriculture and
industrial they are progressively being adapted to knowledge application,
tech innovation and research and development. Technology has the
potential to reach millions to provide resources and new opportunities of
learning and workings to provide the necessary things families need.
The discussion of colonization by foreign rule can never stop because the
consequences are still seen today.

Colonization was designed to keep Africans “under” educated, lacking in
political power and even possessing little or no economic foundation to
build wealth and stability.
Africans must continue to apply their passions, abilities and talents to help
their communities growing through education to make transformative
changes using literature, writing, and the integration of technical resources.
“Getting things done is better than having things perfect. Done is better than
perfect. Whatever you have in your hands, get going with it. Just do it.”
Charles Igwe, Nollywood Global Media Group, Nigeria

Resources:
The Importance of Banks and Banking in Africa
https://youtu.be/D70ZybuB-rE

Bridging the African Diaspora
Bridging the Diaspora Divide – Teresa H. Clarke at TEDxEuston
https://youtu.be/sg6F-M6v1iM

Africa Post-Colonial Development: Fatoumata Waggeh at TEDxGallatin
https://youtu.be/s7lmz4UL4wE

Instagram for Ideas Lane Africa
https://www.instagram.com/ideaslaneafrica/

December 21, 2016

African Students’ Build Your Brand Reputation and Protect It

 

African Students’ Build Your
Brand Reputation and Protect It

 

 

 

William Jackson, M.Ed., Josh Rodriguez and Jon Gregory
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

“Education is the most powerful weapon which
you can use to change the world.” William Butler Yeats

African Student’s Build Your Brand Reputation and Protect It
The more African students use technology the more they create
a digital footprint that will build in global significance.
African students are being judged, evaluated, and scrutinized
by their digital content as they mature into digital citizens
advancing in higher education and deciding on career fields
that are technology based and not the traditional careers that
society or foreign companies try to condition them to take.

Social Media content can influence the future opportunities
for African students, the mistakes of a past wrong action or
choice can come back to haunt a person especially if someone
is out to hurt reputations. The ability to extend your
credibility because of technology can happen by influencing
E-reputations and E-personalities.
African students across their nation and even their continent
need to be involved in, associated with and actively participate
in positive educational, social and leadership building experiences.

Social Media is a platform that can build a student’s Brand
or potentially destroy it before it can ever get started.
It is important that African students understand the
importance of what their developing Brand and what digital
reputations are capable of achieving. Branding and reputations
are collaborations, students can market themselves by developing
a trusted and respected personal or entrepreneurial Brand.
A Brand is a promise to whatever aspirations to be and must
be protected and guarded by strategically planning.

Understanding the abilities, recognizing talents,
building skills and planning strategies that involve growth
and staying away from stupid stuff. “It takes years to build
a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about
that, you’ll do things differently.” Warren Buffett

It is important that a students’ E-reputation
(electronic reputation) and E-personalities
(electronic personality) be protected at all costs because the
infusion, integration and engagement of technology allows for
being seen on a global platform of global connectivity.
Branding is not the style in clothes, current footwear fads,
artistic hairstyles, video gaming high scores or even the latest
language slang; it is being academically prepared,
professionally aware in a highly competitive and diverse
world on a foundation level based on education, personal
growth and improvement.

As a higher education instructor I encourage my students to
connect with others in their major study to share information
about best practices, experiences, resources, and even to
collaborate on projects. Learning takes place outside of the
classroom just as effective if not more than in the classroom.
“A good  reputation  is  more valuable than money.” Publilius Syrus

African students just as students around the world need to
understand that their lives are under scrutiny, people are
watching their personal decisions that are projected on
digital canvases that the world is watching. Whom they are
associated with; “guilt by association” and alliances.

It is important to strategically place themselves where they
can network to increase their visibility to others who have
similar interests and goals and build that Brand.
The hope is to help students of all levels and their parents
understand that associations do matter. Branding can earn
scholarships, internships and increase employment options.
In today’s society parental guidance is needed, but if
parents are not knowledgeable about technology the whole
family must learn together.

E-reputation, E-personality, Social Branding, and the
perceptions that people have play a strong part in the
Branding of students and influences their future.
African students should ask themselves how do they
perceive themselves and how do others perceive them,
do these match and what are the differences and
similarities.

This encourages areas to be addressed that need
strengthening, modification, and weaknesses.
“Everywhere I go, I’m second to arrive. My reputation
precedes me.” Jarod Kintz

In this world of constant technological change,
competitiveness, cultural diversity and lifestyle decisions
students globally must leverage their greatest asset
THEMSELVES in their Brands.
The contributions in the blog are from Jon and Josh
students attending Edward Waters College millennials
that are attending conferences, WordCamp, EdCamp,
WordPress and TEDxFSCJ. They are defining their culture
and developing their Brands.

Resources:
Guy Kawasaki | If I Knew Then What I Know Now | SXSWedu
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eF3ETXzVm-g
MC Hammer | Using Social Media to Develop Your Brand
https://youtu.be/QZn-yn6V_As
Systems of adversity: for the love of teaching | Rusul Alrubail |
TEDxKitchenerED https://youtu.be/CzHP-PIFBH0
The Danger of a Single Story | Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
https://youtu.be/D9Ihs241zeg
Survival of the Fittest Through Intelligence
https://knowledgeablelearners.wordpress.com/2016/12/18/survival-of-the-fittest/
EdCampUSA in Philadelphia
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/TEDxFSCJ%202016%20Salon/story

 

 

 

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