My Quest To Teach

December 9, 2016

EWC and DCPS Student to Speak at TEDxFSCJ Salon

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EWC and DCPS Students to Speak at TEDxFSCJ Salon

The opportunity to speak at a TEDx event is a great
honor and an awesome opportunity to share learning
that changes the paradigm of the intellectualism of teens
and young adults when talking about technology and applying
tech to influence changes in society.
TEDxFSCJ has been ongoing, providing great content
for discussions and actual application.

The national and global discussions provided by
diverse speakers enable those selected to share
their experiences, knowledge and passion in diverse
disciplines in fields such as medicine, science,
technology, religion, politics and engaging in the
area of thought leadership, unexplored creativity and
innovation.

TEDTALKS and TEDx are different entities, the
opportunity to share information and establish
connections are powerful. Selection is highly
respected and offers the chance to grow intellectually
because of the platform of engagement and collaboration
on multiple levels. TEDx are independently run
discussions.

jon-gregory-tedx-salon

Johnathan Gregory a student at Edward Waters College
majoring in  Elementary Education and a proud member
of “Call Me Mister” program and Elisha Taylor a student
attending  Kirby Smith Middle School are both provided
the honor of being presenters at the upcoming
TEDxFSCJ Salon.

Each showing leadership abilities in their academic,
community service and application of the use and
integration of technology.

Mr. Gregory is not just a student at the historic
Edward Waters College, the oldest HBCU in Florida,
he is employed with TEAM UP at Pickett Elementary
School where he is involved in teaching, mentoring
and helping to build young minds for the future.
He has participated in several tech conferences in
Florida sharing his growing experience and skills
as a future educator and thought leader.
EdCampNABSE (Tampa, Florida,)  “TIGERTALKS
Experience” at Edward Waters College (Jacksonville,
Florida), WordCamp Conference (Philadelphia, Pa)
and other tech conferences.
Mr. Gregory is a proud graduate of The Bolles School
and attended Duval County Public Schools in his
elementary and middle school years.

elisha-at-tedx-salon

Elisha Taylor III an honor student at Kirby Smith
Middle, a Magnet School focusing on
STEM – Science Technology Engineering Mathematics.

Mr. Taylor has participated in several technology
conferences as well and attended TEDxFSCJ. Gaining
experience in speaking about and applying his
passion for technology that he has gained from school
and attending conferences like Florida Heritage
Book Festival (St. Augustine, Fl), EdCampMagic
(Orlando, Fl), WordCamp (Jacksonville, Fl.) and
technology Meetups.
Mr. Taylor is influenced by the speaking and presentation
abilities by his father the Senior Minister of Northbound
Church of Christ in Jacksonville, Florida.

Mr. Gregory and Mr. Taylor are
mentored by educator , blogger and professor
William Jackson a teacher with Duval County Public
Schools and professor at the historic Edward Waters College.
Prof. Jackson a blogger and speaker himself travels
nationally to tech conferences and involved in his
community.
Professor Jackson takes students on field trips
encouraging them to not only attend, but to
contribute to the discussions at conferences,
workshops and meetups. Learning, contributing and
applying the integration of technology as students
grow in knowledge and abilities.

This creates changes from teacher centered to student
centered learning and providing increased hands-on
opportunities for collaboration and application
to real world experiences and future careers.
TEDxFSCJ Salon theme is
“Our Digital Leaders of Tomorrow”
http://tedxfcsj.com

2016-12-tedxfscj-salon-poster

Resources:
Jon Gregory:
Instagram @indo_jon
Twitter @Indo__Jon
William Jackson:
Twitter @wmjackson
Instagram
@williamdjackson
Dr. Jose Lepervanche
Twitter
@DrLepervanche
Instagram
@drlepervanche
Florida State College
Twitter
@TEDxFSCJ

Web
tedxfscj.com

 

November 13, 2016

FloridaShines To Hold Virtual College Night

Filed under: Education,HBCU,hIGHER Eduction,Parenting — William Jackson @ 6:00 am

FloridaShines To Hold Virtual College Night

 

 

 

 

 

Florida Shines is proud to host its first live Virtual College Night
Wednesday, November 16 beginning at 5 p.m., with follow-up seminars
Thursday, November 17 from 3 p.m. – 6 p.m.

School counselors, students and parents are invited to participate in
the FREE two-day event, which offers six one-hour sessions covering a
range of issues, from college admissions to financial aid to career planning.
Representatives from the Florida College System, State University System,
Florida Department of Education and others will participate.
Register online here – https://www.floridashines.org/join-florida-virtual-college-night
For questions, contact collegenight@flvc.org

November 4, 2016

The Humanity of Fatherhood

The Humanity of Fatherhood
William Jackson, M.Edu
Edward Waters College
@wmjackson #MyQuestToTeach

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Chinua Achebe, “We cannot trample upon
the humanity of others without devaluing our
own.” The Igbo, always practical, put it
concretely in their proverb:
Onye ji onye n’ani ji onwe ya:
“He who will hold another down in the mud
must stay in the mud to keep him down.”
The Education of a British-Protected Child: Essays

“Fathers, it is time to lift our children, our families,
our culture, our communities from the mud
of poverty, death and destruction.”
William Jackson – My Quest To Teach

Watching the media and the continued deaths
of young men and young women, fathers have
a choice to be a blessing or a curse to their
children, to embed humanity into their process
of raising their families. To lead them to a life
of safety and growth or condemn them to
potential sentences of poverty, lack of
educational success and a societal voice of
silence.

Fathers are supposed to be the foundation,
the rock that their families can stand on during
the storms of life and the challenges that they
will face. The national deaths by violence of
children of color and culture are a signal that
too many fathers are not doing their jobs,
importantly too many men are not parenting,
fathering, guiding and mentoring. Too many
are talking, their lips are moving, but their feet
and hearts are standing still. There is work to
do in their communities, but too many fathers
are counterproductive and adding to the
troubles their communities are facing.

 

 

 

Fathers are influential in the social and
educational directions of their children, they set
the tones for social interaction, establishing the
direction of their children and others around
them, growing and developing the social skills
and humbleness that boys and girls developing
into men and women will need. Children are
modeling their father’s activities, mentalities,
their lack of compassion and lack of sensitivities
to their children. The father is the model whether
at home or not, looking at the communities of
color and culture too many fathers are not
involved or do not care.

Social skills are not just necessary social requirements;
they are the patterns of behaviors for survival that boys
and girls of color and culture will need to know in order
to grow in a society that is still struggling with boys and
girls of diversity and color. The directions of life take
many twists and turns for youth especially African
American youth, this is NOT another hate the system
or hate the government blog, nor is it a blog on what
the educational system is not accomplishing.

This blog addresses the responsibilities of “Men in
the Village” to re-evaluate and re-prioritize their thinking
and to be of service to their communities.
The great Nigerian author Chinua Achebe through his
writings tries to teach men that positive emotions to
their children are beneficial and “do not
fear being
thought weak as a man” because men show emotions,
they should to establish a connection with their families.

Men have a right that extends to the accountability and
responsibility to be involved in their children’s educational
growth and development. How can hundreds if not
thousands of men attend sporting events in support
of their children, but cannot consistently volunteer, visit,
mentor, support their children’s schools that are preparing
them for life in this nation?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Achebe shares, “(fathers) do not show any human emotions
and sentiments so as not to be seen as weak,” are creating
un-caring societies where children are forgetting the value
of love, compassion, sympathy and honor. Men do not have
to cry to show emotions, but should hug and kiss their children,
hold their hands and provide emotional support and
mental comfort just as African men have done for centuries.
How many men can blame the State Attorney’s Office
and law enforcement if they won’t “man up” handling
their “business” and parental responsibilities in raising
their children? Prisons are not Day Cares, Learning
Centers, Enrichment Organizations; how many men can
blame the school district if they have not started the
process of educating their children in the basics of
reading, math and social behaviors at home that allow
for education in a formal setting to start. Learning
starts at home and fathers need to be responsible
for this happening.

The streets, back alleys, street corners and clubs of
our communities will teach skills that will lead to
death or prison as seen in children today, what real
father can be proud of that?

Fathers need to be involved in a dialogue that teaches
with love and wisdom, young fathers
need help. Children should be seen holding their
fathers hands, sitting on their laps and involved in
activities that build critical thinking skills, encourage
problem solving abilities and promote higher order
thinking that creates language development, increased
vocabulary and appreciation for being intelligent.

“People say that if you find water rising up to your ankle,
that’s the time to do something about it, not when it’s
around your neck.” Chinua Achebe
African American communities are finding crime and
death inching around their necks, they should do
something positive about it to make a change in their
communities. When “not snitching” is more important
than a child’s life that was taken by a bullet is the priority
the humanity has been taken away. Human life is not
valued and is less than that of an animal.
Because of continuous generational tragedies young
people of color are thereby increasing their likelihood
of entering correctional facilities, and if daddy is not
there who do kids model except who they see on the
street or movies?

To keep children of color and culture from entering
into the “pipeline” prevention and pro-action is needed.
Fathers are an important part of this effort, fathers need
to be trained and encouraged. Ronnie Cage, community
activist and national trainer for fathers and fathering skills
has encouraged fathers need training to be fathers for
years.
Parenting is a powerful force; parents have a spiritual
connection to their children and a responsibility to raise
them. Research from the University of Maryland (2000)
indicates that, “children who have fathers or father figures
in their lives learn better, have higher self-esteem and
show fewer signs of depression and aggression.”
“…children who identified a father or father figure
scored higher on basic learning skill tests and had
a stronger sense of competence and social acceptance
compared to children without fathers”
(University of Maryland Medical News, 2000).

Fact “Black males represent six percent of the U.S.
population, yet 35 percent
of the prison population and less than two percent
of teachers” Morehouse College Educational
Conference 2009.
All these have an effect on the mental and emotional
state of children of color and culture.
In the beginning man was created first to care for the
world, so men must take the lead and be a part of
their children’s lives before cemeteries and prisons
have more children
in them than schools and playgrounds.

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