My Quest To Teach

July 26, 2017

WordCamp and Building Your Synaptic and Linguistic Agility 

WordCamp and Building Your Synaptic and Linguistic Agility
by William Jackson
Speaker: WordCamp Jacksonville 2017, WordCamp DC 2017
Parent, Educator, Blogger, Social Media Visionary, Content Creator

Attending any WordCamp should not just be an esoteric experience.
Being a part of WordCamp should be an experience that allows
for the spirit of innovation, the imagination of creativity and the
thirst for unquenchable knowledge to grab hold of a person’s
mind. Applying new knowledge to current/past knowledge, being
able to find new ways to create, share and transport knowledge
that can be applied to the diversity of life.
The body is a vessel that carries the brain, the heart and other
physical organs, but it also transports the spirit of passions and
the dreams of ingenuity and imagination. Technology does not
dwell in a sterile one dimensional environment, technology
embraces the diversity of the firing of the synapsis in the brain.
The thoughts that are as powerful as bursts of lighting and
applied linguistic agility.
Thoughts are electrical impulses that give rise to reality and
an entrance to the depths of the mind.
When a person thinks each thought is the result of a stimuli
that can result from a simple smell, a taste, a sound or even
a physical feeling. The site of a face can create a myriad of
emotions that can be pleasing, frightening, or overwhelming.
Technology is part of the mental and emotional selves that we
as humans create and share in our world. When attending a
WordCamp a person cannot just stay within themselves they
must venture out and connect, collaborate and create the
foundation of building real and lasting relationships.
WordCamp is an environment resulting from a seemingly
simple application of WordPress, an online environment that
allows for mental agility, emotional creativity and innovation
in an environment that allows the synapsis of our brain to
think, dream, speculate, consider, communicate, collaborate,
calculate and connect.
The ability for humans using technology to emerge from the
binary melting pot of coding to create the ability to communicate
on diverse levels. Seeking parity is not the priority, but the
transcending of current realities that have limited physical
actions. The mind knows no limitations only those created
by limited imaginations and self-perceived confines in a world
of rules and realities begging to be broken.
What is WordCamp; not just a simple or mundane explanation,
it is being adapted because the men, women, boys, girls and
diversity of nations, cultures, and ideologies are opening digital
doorways to a matrix of dynamic and infinite possibilities of
thinking, feeling, creating, innovation and being. Open Source
is an opening for the mind to fly though at light speed without
limitations to achieve wonders on digital platforms.
WordCamp and Building Your Linguistic Agility is requiring
modifying languages to adapt to new forms of communication
outside the spectrum of physical verbiage, it is demanding the
ability to create new languages that binary coding and human
thoughts are equal partners in communication.
When attending a WordCamp take the time to listen to the
conversations, attempt to enter into the minds of programmers,
developers, graphic artists, users, developers and others as
they share experiences that only those that apply WordPress
can only understand. Open the source of creativity that lives
and grows in minds that enjoy creativity, imagination and the
challenge of coding that machines only listen to.
Challenging people to share their stories is the easy part,
having people accepting the challenge to apply their mental
synapsis is the challenge and my quest.
#MyQuestToTeach

myhashtag

 

July 10, 2017

EdCamp Leadership Building PLN + PLC = PLF

Group Photo

EdCamp Leadership Building PLN + PLC = PLF
by Wm Jackson
Educator, STEAM Advocate, EdCamp Organizer
and Participant

Professional Learning Networks + Professional Learning Communities =
Professional Learning Families

The voices that help to manage EdCamp inspires collaboration and professional
development on a foundational level for educational professionals. To inspire and
engage teachers as professionals, embrace the humanity that is in each teacher,
to aspire and guide students beyond their perceived limitations of themselves and
of what others perceive them to have.
Sharing the dynamics of Professional Learning Communities, building and using
Professional Learning Networks and enhancing the importance of each because
it takes a village family to help raise and develop children; this is the Professional
Learning Family.
Professional Learning Families where educators look beyond the profession to
see the value of a family structure in education. Each classroom, each school and
each community is a culture that must be managed to guide students and even
families step by step in the educational process. A holistic approach to learning
that inspires and even agitates teachers to do better.

Takeaways from 2017 EdCamp Leadership that had 8 counties represented.
a. Every behavior a student shows in not a consequence for discipline. Look
beyond the behavior to find the reason and situation for the actions.
b. Preserve your academic learning environment. Set the atmosphere for
respect, high expectations and building bridges for success and relationships.
c. Start using parents as a resource to help manage classroom management.
Always have something nice to say about all your students because they
deserve to feel safe and wanted in the classroom and school.
d. The importance of relevancy and the connection that all learning is important.
Learning is a life-long endeavor that should be taught along with why learning
is valuable.
e. Administration should be listening to the classroom teachers about how to
improve the school environment. Teachers should also feel valued and needed
for their passion, experience, intelligence, sacrifice and humanity as people
not robots or programs.
f. If teachers have something that works in the classroom they should be
encouraged to share it.
g. The environment of the school should support high levels of confidence in
every teacher and moral should be maintained at every opportunity.  Every
person from teacher, custodian, office personnel, lunch room, etc should
feel valued and needed.
h. Teachers should be authentic and transparent, never be fake, rude or
sarcastic to students, parents or peer professionals.
i. Teachers should share what does not work and remember every lesson
is not for every student.
j. Consistency sends a message to students that they can trust you and
rely on you to be the same person all the time. Don’t go and get
“new” on them.
k. Teachers should communicate with parents consistently and invite
them into the classroom to watch and participate in learning.
l. Technology can bridge the gap between single parents, grandparents and
teachers if applied correctly
m. Teachers don’t assume your children’s parents are of the same educational
level. Just because your students’ parents speak Spanish do not assume
they can read Spanish. Just because your students’ parents or family are
professional and college educated they are providing
all the emotional and cognitive needs of their children.
n. Teachers take the time to read and comprehend your student’s academic
folders, drive their neighborhoods and look in the grocery stores in the
community to see their environment.
o. Before a teacher can teach they must build a relationship with their students.
p. Teachers must share their educational, social and behavior expectations
for their classroom and the school.
q. Teachers are responsible for building their classroom culture and the
administration is responsible for the school culture. They must work in unison
and collaboration.
r. Teachers should let their students know their stories are important and
all learning should be purposeful.
s. Teachers should let their students know that they embrace and
respect diversity.
t. Teachers should take a stand on student learning not just related
to assessments.

Teachers should have a homework assignment for their parents in the form
of a written assignment. Beginning  the new school  year ask your parents
to write in 1000 words or less what do they want
you to know as their child’s teacher to learn about their child.
“Open the doors for information exchanges early with parents.”
Comment shared at EdCamp Leadership, “students that are loved at home
come to school to be taught, and students that are not loved at home come
to school to be loved.”

May 29, 2017

Dynamic African Stories Are Relevant

Filed under: Chinua Achebe,Education,Literacy,Ngugi wa Thiong'o,Wole Soyinka — William Jackson @ 6:30 am

fight

Dynamic African Stories Are Relevant
William Jackson, M.Edu. @wmjackson
Edward Waters College

Based on the presentation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
(Nigerian author) through TED Talks,
“The Danger of a Single Story.”
African children, each child has a story, a story that
defines their lives, a story of diverse emotional and
psychological dimensions, it is important that African
adults play a part in their children’s developing
stories because adults set the tone for
continued growth the children will grow to
take leadership roles in their respective nations.

Childrens lives are like books and because each page
is blank, African parents need to be cautious as to
what is imprinted on each page.
Childrens stories cannot be erased, rewritten, edited
nor started over. Their lives are continuous pages that
may branch off into diffrent storylines, each
storyline is as important as the next because they
are the stories of that child.

Parents establish the foundation of a childs language
development. The term “garbage in, garbage out” is a
technology term that can be applied to the educational
and cultural development of African and American children.
As technology expands in households what goes into a
child will come out. Technology is
a two edged sword and parents must guide their
children to determine what is good and what is bad.

African parents help to create a storyline in their
children by allowing or denying the infusion of reading
and literature. If parents encourage reading, cognitive
development, appreciation of diverse literary content,
their children will have a well rounded literary
background which allows for strong language development,
appreciation for diversity and promote the strenthening
of African societies.

I do not know the individual academic situations of
African families or children, so this is not a judgment
just educational guidance to help those that have a
desire to help families and children if color and
culture.

Listening to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “The Danger of a
Single Story,” my interpretation is for African parents
to understand how they shape, mold and create the stories
of their children because society will continue to
create their own story of African and American
children of color.
Based on the color of skin or the perceived cultural
background. Children will be given a false story as was
done during colonization. African parents
must make sure an authentic story is heard loud and clear
about their culture, their societies and their children.
Chinua Achebe often shares how his culture (Ibo) was forever
changed by colonization. So transformative was the change
that his book, “When Things Fall Apart,” was published,
it resonated globally with many cultures that were
tragically affected by European, Japanese, Chinese, and
other cultural colonization.

Each new day is an opportunity to create a story
of societal unity, progressive educational access and
understanding the Africans place in the world. Each child
is a single story that is continuously being developed,
the story is written on the lifelines that are a trail of
deeds, actions, events and circumstances that cannot be
changed once done.

Because of the dimensions of life our stories
cannot be rewritten because they happen each
second, each minute, each hour of each day.

As Ms. Adichie states we cannot buy into a
single story based on the media (paraphrasing).
“Show a people as one thing, and only one thing
over and over again, and that is what they become.”
In many cases African children have been given the
wrong information and their perceptions of self are wrong.

When we allow one story to be told about a culture,
gender, and lifestyle things can get twisted and misinterpreted.
One story cannot be the representation of a whole culture or
race of people. The media will have you believe an opposite
truth than the reality. Ms. Adichie states that,
“The single story creates stereotypes, the problem is
not that they are true they are incomplete.”
This is one of the misconceptions African Americans have
of each other and the African culture, African Americans
have been so brainwashed and mislead they lost their
connection with Africa. They no longer see the historical,
cultural, ethinic, scientific, medical and global greatness
that is Africa. There is only one story that the media tells
that is inaccurate.

Each African child is important to the story of Africa
because of the capcity for change, the ability to
influence the stories of each other and the cultural
stories that continue to expand.
Listen to the stories of the past African Writers:
Chinua Achebe, Mariama Bâ, NoViolet Bulawayo Tsitsi
Dangarembga, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Binyavanga Wainaina,
Steve Biko, Buchi Emecheta, Teju Cole
These are just a few that inspire, influence and
encourage the African story.

Educators in Africa have a tremendous job to teach
African children about their history and also to teach
African children what their place is in the world.

 

chinua-achebe-2

 

Resources:
25 Books by African Writers
http://lithub.com/25-new-books-by-african-writers-you-should-read/

Popular African Writers
https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/african-writers

Top 10 African Writers
http://theculturetrip.com/africa/articles/the-top-10-contemporary-african-writers-you-should-know/

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