My Quest To Teach

May 29, 2017

Dynamic African Stories Are Relevant

Filed under: Chinua Achebe,Education,Literacy,Ngugi wa Thiong'o,Wole Soyinka — William Jackson @ 6:30 am

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Dynamic African Stories Are Relevant
William Jackson, M.Edu. @wmjackson
Edward Waters College

Based on the presentation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
(Nigerian author) through TED Talks,
“The Danger of a Single Story.”
African children, each child has a story, a story that
defines their lives, a story of diverse emotional and
psychological dimensions, it is important that African
adults play a part in their children’s developing
stories because adults set the tone for
continued growth the children will grow to
take leadership roles in their respective nations.

Childrens lives are like books and because each page
is blank, African parents need to be cautious as to
what is imprinted on each page.
Childrens stories cannot be erased, rewritten, edited
nor started over. Their lives are continuous pages that
may branch off into diffrent storylines, each
storyline is as important as the next because they
are the stories of that child.

Parents establish the foundation of a childs language
development. The term “garbage in, garbage out” is a
technology term that can be applied to the educational
and cultural development of African and American children.
As technology expands in households what goes into a
child will come out. Technology is
a two edged sword and parents must guide their
children to determine what is good and what is bad.

African parents help to create a storyline in their
children by allowing or denying the infusion of reading
and literature. If parents encourage reading, cognitive
development, appreciation of diverse literary content,
their children will have a well rounded literary
background which allows for strong language development,
appreciation for diversity and promote the strenthening
of African societies.

I do not know the individual academic situations of
African families or children, so this is not a judgment
just educational guidance to help those that have a
desire to help families and children if color and
culture.

Listening to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “The Danger of a
Single Story,” my interpretation is for African parents
to understand how they shape, mold and create the stories
of their children because society will continue to
create their own story of African and American
children of color.
Based on the color of skin or the perceived cultural
background. Children will be given a false story as was
done during colonization. African parents
must make sure an authentic story is heard loud and clear
about their culture, their societies and their children.
Chinua Achebe often shares how his culture (Ibo) was forever
changed by colonization. So transformative was the change
that his book, “When Things Fall Apart,” was published,
it resonated globally with many cultures that were
tragically affected by European, Japanese, Chinese, and
other cultural colonization.

Each new day is an opportunity to create a story
of societal unity, progressive educational access and
understanding the Africans place in the world. Each child
is a single story that is continuously being developed,
the story is written on the lifelines that are a trail of
deeds, actions, events and circumstances that cannot be
changed once done.

Because of the dimensions of life our stories
cannot be rewritten because they happen each
second, each minute, each hour of each day.

As Ms. Adichie states we cannot buy into a
single story based on the media (paraphrasing).
“Show a people as one thing, and only one thing
over and over again, and that is what they become.”
In many cases African children have been given the
wrong information and their perceptions of self are wrong.

When we allow one story to be told about a culture,
gender, and lifestyle things can get twisted and misinterpreted.
One story cannot be the representation of a whole culture or
race of people. The media will have you believe an opposite
truth than the reality. Ms. Adichie states that,
“The single story creates stereotypes, the problem is
not that they are true they are incomplete.”
This is one of the misconceptions African Americans have
of each other and the African culture, African Americans
have been so brainwashed and mislead they lost their
connection with Africa. They no longer see the historical,
cultural, ethinic, scientific, medical and global greatness
that is Africa. There is only one story that the media tells
that is inaccurate.

Each African child is important to the story of Africa
because of the capcity for change, the ability to
influence the stories of each other and the cultural
stories that continue to expand.
Listen to the stories of the past African Writers:
Chinua Achebe, Mariama Bâ, NoViolet Bulawayo Tsitsi
Dangarembga, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Binyavanga Wainaina,
Steve Biko, Buchi Emecheta, Teju Cole
These are just a few that inspire, influence and
encourage the African story.

Educators in Africa have a tremendous job to teach
African children about their history and also to teach
African children what their place is in the world.

 

chinua-achebe-2

 

Resources:
25 Books by African Writers
http://lithub.com/25-new-books-by-african-writers-you-should-read/

Popular African Writers
https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/african-writers

Top 10 African Writers
http://theculturetrip.com/africa/articles/the-top-10-contemporary-african-writers-you-should-know/

May 3, 2017

Redefining of African American Education Through STEAM

Filed under: Education,Literacy,Parenting,Reading,STEAM,STEAM and STEM,STEM,STEM3,STREAM — William Jackson @ 6:15 am

STEAM and STEM

 

Redefining of African American Education Through STEAM
by William Jackson STEAM and STEM Advocate
#MyQuestToTeach
In collaboration with Jax Markerspace panelists:
Shawanna Brooks, Akia Uwanda, Latonja Richardson,
Princess S. Rashid, and Angie Nixon

Education in STEAM requires a holistic approach to teaching children
and families of color and culture the value of STEM and the incorpor-
ation of the Arts. STEM / STEAM panel discussion at the Jacksonville
Public Library – Jax Markerspace held a dynamic panel discussion
of women who are actively engaged in the field of STEAM as entrepr-
eneurs, business leaders, parents and advocates of STEAM through
their personal talents and skills.
Many parents still do not understand the letters and the connection
to their children’s education. Science Technology Engineering Arts
Mathematics, an educational initiative to prepare students for 21st
century careers not just jobs.
The Arts is an important element in promoting STEAM and the
engagement of young people from elementary age or younger to
high school students. “The biggest danger of unemployment today
is not of immigration it is the advancements of technology in robotics,”
Princess S. Rashid which is causing unemployment faster than any
immigrant attempting to cross the borders of this nation to find
employment to support their families.
The distinguished panel including the hostess for Jax Markerspace
at the Downtown Jacksonville Public Library Shawanna Brooks,
musical artist and entrepreneur Akia Uwanda, parent and advocate
for STEM, STEAM and STREAM. Latonja Richardson and her
daughter Taylor who aspires to be an astronaut traveling to Mars.
Princess S. Rashid, Physicist, Artist and Thought Leader, and Angie
Nixon author, literary visionary and entrepreneur of The Adventures
of Moxie Girl with her daughter Natalie and community activist.
Putting STEAM into STEM was a dynamic discussion about the
power of change in education, economics, commerce and even
political power because of the changes that lead to national and
global influences in the changes of careers and thought leadership.
The 20th and 21st century is going through dynamic change because
of the integration of digital technologies. This unique discussion
provided women of diverse walks of life and goals to come together
in solidarity that communities especially African American, Hispanic
and other people of color need to be engaged in involving their
children in hands on learning with higher order and critical thinking.
Paraphrasing Angie Nixon and Latonjay Richardson, the holistic
approach comes to play that children will not change if they continue
to be limited by their environments. If the environment does not
change neither will the desire to change educationally and if there
is no change educationally there may be no change economically.
Princess S. Rashid commented that Black children must learn to
like math and the empowerment it can provide as seen from her
video below.
There is no way around it, math can open doors and provide
access to new careers. Jacksonville Public Library Shawanna
Brooks shared that the resources of the library are free to
everyone and parents need to have their children here to
learn about the global implications of education and business.
The panelists were in agreement that the thinking of students
will not change if parental thinking does not change, thus the
holistic thinking of family and community.  Parents set the tone
and in many cases the direction of educational and career
decisions. In attendance was Mark McCombs, “I teach people
how to build robots and to do what they used to think was
impossible.” Mark McCombs FIRST LEGO League that creates
dynamic opportunities for team building, engineering, building
and coding of robotics that are involved in competitions.
This is another key area of STEM and STEAM student can be
involved in, but must get their schools engaged.
Children are conditioned by their environment, if they do not
see change or the conditions for change their thinking will
remain the same, their desire to change their lives will not be
inspired.
The panel discussion brought a new direction to potentially
changing how children should be taught. Being active, engaged,
and hands on brings faster growth than traditional lecture
instruction. Children in schools today are not like the children
of the 40’s through 80’s, they are more active and require
increased visual, auditory and active stimulation. Because
of this change education needs to be modified as well. When
listening to the discussions there is a urgency and a sense
of priority in the realization of the influence of technology and
it’s generational influences.
These ladies of influence, knowledge, social conscious, civic
duty and even a moral directional conscious want every child
to be successful because it “takes a village,” as Latonya
Richardson shares to the audience, to raise the leaders,
workers, innovators and creators of the present and the future.
Putting STEAM into STEM provides an opportunity to share the
potential to move children from being consumers of technology
to creators, innovators, visionaries and models for future
generations.

 

20170412_175452.jpg
#STEAM into #STEM 2017
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/
STEAM%20into%20STEM%202017/story

A discussion about the integration
STEAM into the #Arts – Photos via @wmjackson @jaxlibrary

Facebook Resources:
JaxMakerSpace
https://www.facebook.com/jaxmakerspace/
Shawana Brooks
https://www.facebook.com/shawana.brooks
Erin Estreet Kendric
https://www.facebook.com/ErinEstreetKendrick
Akia Uwanda
https://www.facebook.com/akia.uwanda
Angie Nixon
https://www.facebook.com/angienixon
Latonja Richardson
https://www.facebook.com/latonja.richardson
Princess S. Rashid
https://www.facebook.com/prashid
Mark D McCombs
https://www.facebook.com/markdmccombs
FIRST LEGO LEAGUE
https://www.facebook.com/pg/FLFIRSTLEGOLeague/
William Jackson
https://www.facebook.com/williamdjacksoninfl
and contributions by the distinguished panel.

Videos
What is STEM by Shawanna Brooks
https://youtu.be/fTkzCChDeMU
The Importance of Math in STEM and STEAM
https://youtu.be/Kwv8Geb47_Q
Tony Richardson Being a STEM Parent
https://youtu.be/lsR3eV5-Pck
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April 30, 2017

POWHERFUL Women and BROTHERHOOD of MEN

20170415_084719

 

POWHERFUL Women and BROTHERHOOD of MEN
Girl Version 

by William Jackson
Twitter @wmjackson
Blogging #MyQuestToTeach

The recent summits for teen and young adults in Jacksonville
shows that the community understands the need for engagement
with young ladies and young men of this city and Northeast
Florida.
To build leaders, strengthen community, encourage personal
self-esteem and the importance of applied educational knowledge
to help young ladies and young men build into leaders and
activists.
High schools; private, public and charter were represented
well by the participants that showed young people in Jacksonville
are among the best and brightest in the nation.
Both teen and young adult women and men need to understand the
value of applying their learning to potential careers and
future growth in economics, commerce, business, politics,
community services and as entrepreneurs that will run businesses
employing their peers.
Education is not just gained in school classrooms; networking
is a learned skill and having self-esteem, self-respect,
life goals and long term aspirations is vital.
The POWHERFUL and I CHOOSE BROTHERHOOD summits each empower
their unique audience of teens and young adults geared to
that audience. The diversity of attendance represents the
cultural diversity of Northeast Florida and that all cultures
are valuable and contibute to the success of our city.
Each summit had local and national influencers in a various
industries that draw local and national attention to issues
important to teens and young adults.
Summits like these touch on a broader audience and has
a ripple affect in teens and young adults becoming themselves
influencers and smart creatives in their community and schools.
The unique nature of each summit is that there were not gender
distractions. POWHERFUL was dedicated to young ladies and
I CHOOSE BROTHERHOOD dedicated to young men.
Jacksonville needs to continue to provide summits, workshops,
and conferences that focus on teens and young adult issues,
they cannot be ignored nor denied the constitutional rights
they are guaranteed of opportunities of speak and assembly.
Jacksonville is learning that issues are not settled by law
enforcement, laws, curfews or other legislative embargoes.
Children, youth, teens and young adults need interactive
engagement with the adults in their lives to talk about
the issues that are important to them.
As a parent, educator, mentor and community activist the best
results are gained by caring and showing that you do care about
young people by being engaged and active. Society can only be
best served when our children, teens and young adults know
that they can be seen and heard.

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Resources:
POWHERFUL – Instagram – Twitter – Facebook = @powherfulfdn
Soledad O’Brien, Starfish Foundation – Twitter @soledadobrien
Sheba Turk , News Anchor – Twitter @shebaturk
Akia Uwanda , Entertainer and Entrepreneur
FB – akiauwandaentertainer – Twitter – @akiauwanda

Videos:
Akia Uwanda how she started her career
https://youtu.be/eMLFq_Vs0AM
Blue Print for Success
https://youtu.be/lkI4TnMoy1Q
Financial Aid for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/rmDMpz0AGSU
First Step to get Money
https://youtu.be/JQIdQbKvbn8
Free Money for School
https://youtu.be/RMc0e2Mh2s8
Getting Loans for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/38Fjt7ITmas
How to Address Bullying In School
https://youtu.be/fr4NmN09WYM
Scholarships for Higher Education
https://youtu.be/sgyfi7cthtA
Starting A Music Career Akia Uwanda
https://youtu.be/gABGgFXpFKU
Starting Your Careers
https://youtu.be/cNI_lnSiXdY
The Stress of Bullying
https://youtu.be/PEfNaVqTzns

My Photos:
http://s1211.photobucket.com/user/williamdjackson/POWHERFUL%202017/story

 

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