My Quest To Teach

April 8, 2017

Black Girl Magic As An Agent of STEM

STEM  Panelists
Hortinse Diggs – Grace Johnson – Mary Madison – Lesley Harris

“Science is not a boy’s game, it’s not a girl’s game.
It’s everyone’s game. It’s about where we are and
where we’re going.
Space travel benefits us here on Earth. And we
ain’t stopped yet. There’s more exploration to come.”
Nichelle Nichols, former NASA Ambassador and actress

“When I was young I was very interested in science
and technology, and my dad brought home the first
computer. I played pac man and I was hooked!
By learning to create technology, girls learn to
speak up.”
Regina Agyare, Founder of software company
Soronko Solutions

“Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street
with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she
is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom
of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely
cause is the elephant on her chest.
For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of
women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the
elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and
lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask
the question.”
Sally Ride
First American Woman in Space
Challenger Space Shuttle, 1983

—————————————————————————————-

VIDEOS

Encouraging Words from Women of STEM

Encouraging our students in STEM

A Good Work Ethic Is Important

Have a Passion for Math

Build Friendships with Others

Mentoring and Allow God to Work

Put In That Vision for College Early

You have to believe in yourself always

———————————————————————————————

PHOTOS

Advertisements

April 5, 2017

Black Girl Magic – Walking the Path as An Agent of STEAM

Black Girl Magic – Walking the Path as An Agent of STEAM
by William Jackson – @wmjackson Twitter

20170314_194219

“No idea is ever too small to start something big.
Nothing is impossible; it’s just a matter of hard
work and identifying the right opportunities.”
Eloine Barry Of African Media Agency

Many sororities are sharing inspiring stories of women
that are no longer Hidden Figures, they are pioneers
and innovators, they are visible and inspiring girls and
women to enter into new fields. They are role models
and mentors to build girls and women to stand on strong
shoulders to climb higher and fly further. Through STEM
education and STEAM integration women are taking
leadership roles and creating transformative changes in
society and are role models for girls following behind
them.

The women of AKA and the HBCU-Edward Waters College
recently held an inspirational panel discussion to
share the victories, challenges and inspiration of
Black Girl Magic and that Black Girls Do Rock in STEM.
The panel consisted of women that are engineers with
NASA, educators with the skills of mathematics and
community activists.

Pioneering the way for girls and women to see the poten-
tial of new ways to explore the planets, the oceans and
even inner space within the human body. STEM, STEAM
and even STREAM are the way to go for girls and boys,
men and women especially of color like
Taylor Richardson a real life Power Puff Girl hear her story:
https://www.facebook.com/hulu/videos/1408713792500385/

People of color especially  girls  and  boys of color and
culture are provided so many opportunities to grow beyond
the limited expectations of those that only see stereo-
types and looking through their biases. Still caught
in an era of separation of cultures and even genders.
This should stop, it is a time for unity to encourage
exploration and scientific discovery. To think and live
out of the boxes of poverty and unemployment.

20161217_163812
Natalie on the right…..

Natalie McGriff, Taylor Richardson, Deyona Burton are
examples influencing girls and women not just on a local
and national level, but on an international platform of
diversity and acceptance in the differences we have.
Girls have wonderful opportunities to chase their
dreams in fields once commanded by men. STEM, STREAM
and STEAM provide unlimited access to educational
equality, research and development opportunities.
Internships and scholarships that at one time where
only considered for males to fill. Now women are
qualifying for new careers that demand higher order
thinking, critical thinking, innovative thinking and
thinking out of the box strategies that tackle 21st
century challenges that our
society faces today and may face in the future.

group-pict
Elisha (left), unknown, Deyona(3rd from left)
Taylor (2nd from right), Jon right

Deyona Burton involved in her community and making
sure her future is clear in the areas of STEM she
is passionate in and guided by her mother who has
dreams of success and prosperity.

Ms. Richardson and others are showing that the
road is paved with success if the person is willing
to work hard in the classroom and in the community.
Astronaut StarBright (Taylor Richardson), inspiring
girls everywhere!!! Not just making excuses, but
working hard in school and the community.
https://www.facebook.com/bbcnews/videos/1275012832582927/

The shout and scream excitement is that girls  and
women are not limited any longer by their complacency
to better themselves. They do not have to wait on
a door to open, they do not have to wait on a man,
they are busting down doors, shattering glass
ceilings and creating their own innovative
initiatives that influence society and creating
their own movements and moments with urgency
and purpose. They are not settling for anything
in live, taking hold of each day with a passion,
purpose and potential to be leaders and innovators.

Moxie Girl and The Astronaut

The epitome of Black Girl Magic and Black Girls Rule
and Rock are girls that see the world differently, do
not limit themselves by anyone else’s standards.
They are making their own rules and raising the
standards. Just as little girls on the play grounds
chant, “girls rule and boys drool,” it is being produced
on many levels.
https://blavity.com/this-13-year-old-aspiring-astronaut-is-spreading-blackgirlmagic?utm_content=buffer2245c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Other girls to watch and follow that are promoting
literacy, education, positive self image and even
community activism.
The world claims it needs role models and they are
in plain site providing examples of excellence and
imagination.
The Adventures of Moxie Girl!
https://www.facebook.com/theadventuresofmoxiegirl/videos/1870167626553626/
The Adventure of Moxie Girl Facebook Page
https://www.facebook.com/theadventuresofmoxiegirl/
#25daysofMoxie Twitter and Facebook

What does strength have to do with it? Ask the women of
The Strength of SHE @strengthofshe – unity and sisterhood
that builds a coalition – “Empowering black women to
stay beautiful, healthy & love themselves” taken from
http://www.thestrengthofshe.com/
The growth of Black Girl Magic is not a singularity
it is more than a duality it is a culture and a
collective. Spanning generations and even connected in
the magnificence of innovation and creativity.

Black Girl Magic – Walking the Path as An Agent of STEAM
requires a vision for success, it demands planning and
learning how to be a visionary and to follow dreams that
seem impossible to others, they are just a walk in the
park for women of color and culture.

This blog is in dedication to the Black Girl Magic
that influences the world, that inspires, that engages
and even creates the fear of failure, but the will to
face any challenge. The demand for gender parity and
equality, for education to all girls and women of color
and culture, this is the age of
Black Girl Magic and Black Girls Rock the world.

Even on an international level on the continent of Africa
women are leading and changing the paradigm of mindsets
and entrepreneurialism. The development of women in a world
that cannot get out of the way of changes that are needed
and in many ways desired. These events even leads to Africa
where She Leads Africa explodes http://sheleadsafrica.com/

images

Resources:
Black Women as Doctors
Melanin, M.D. – @MelaninMD
1st & 2nd yr med students tweeting advice/inspiration for
premeds. Aiming to enrich medicine through diversity.
http://melaninmd.org/shop | melaninmd@gmail.com

Excited about the opportunity to send two local youths
from Jacksonville, FL, to Space Camp with the remaining
funds raised from the Hidden Figures movie initiative.
Check out the link below for more information on
Space Camp.
http://www.spacecamp.com

The applicant  must  be  between the ages of 12 – 16 and
write an essay on why he or she should go to
Space Camp.
The essay must be no more than 500 words.
All essays are due by April 15, 2017 and should be
“mailed” to:
Attn: Taylor Richardson
PO Box 54601
Jacksonville, FL 32245

No email essays will be accepted.
We will announce the winners mid May 2017.
Please be sure to check spelling, grammar and the
usage of any data related to you being selected.
Good luck!!!!

 

March 10, 2017

Teaching Our Youth To Be Cautious On Social Media

Teaching Our Youth To Be Cautious On Social Media
by William Jackson speaking at
The Bridge of Northeast Florida

Recent deaths by suicide on Social Media,
the use of drugs and alcohol
as glamorous and exciting, sexual exploitation,
Sexting, Cyberbullying, threats, intimidation and
the use of Social Media to make political threats
and accusations is sending the wrong message
to youth, teens and young adults.

The availability of learning experiences should never be denied to youth
and teens with technology. In the world of digital communication, diverse
Social Media platforms and tools, Apps that allow for instant access to
family and friends tech can be both good and bad. Technology influences
the So Lo Mo of life: So – social engagement of youth and teens,
Lo – access to local activities and events, Mo – mobile technologies that
move with youth and teens so they are always connected.

The Bridge of Northeast Florida (Cynthia Gibson) and William Jackson
(educator, trainer and speaker) have provided dedicated workshops
addressing Sexting, Bullying, Cyberbullying and STEM/STEAM
along with the value of HBCUs in higher education and career
development.
Even at the elementary and middle school age youth need to learn the
dangers of being online and giving out personal and even family information.
How people try to gain their friendship online, try to manipulate them
mentally and emotionally putting themselves and their families in dangerous
situations.

Sexting has consequences and that a wrong choice can follow them a
lifetime and ruin a career, building a family and even in this age of digital
commerce can have unforeseen influences with personal credit and entrance
into higher education, military service and stable employment.
Information never goes away and can cause legal problems even jail time
and labeling when involved in Sexting or child pornography. Parents need
to check their children’s phones from time to time, but many are too afraid
of the response from their children.
The plus side is understanding how positive and empowering STEM is and
influence life for children.

Science Technology Engineering and Math can be seen from the examples
of Hidden Figures and that there are local role models like Taylor Richardson
who are working to be NASA astronauts and travel to Mars and the stars.
Students during the discussion phase are unfortunately being told that Blacks
have never been into space and they are not “smart” enough to be involved
in high tech careers. Parents more than ever before need to talk to their
children about their career choices, the value of education and why/how
STEM can help them achieve their goals as adults.

Parents need to take their children to museums, libraries and cultural events
so their children are exposed to educational opportunities and services as
The Bridge offers to the community of Jacksonville, Florida.
The Bridge of Northeast Florida provides many services to prepare future
leaders that are children in our schools and communities now, preparing them
to lead in the future as current leaders age and retire.

Children of color and culture should be educated, mentored and see positive
role models as examples of what can be achieved. In The Bridge they
see these and more by presentations, speakers, role models and mentoring.
Children of color should know who the first Black woman and Black man where
to fly into space, who the other firsts of their cultures are and not be told that
Blacks have not accomplished great things in history. The truth is out there
and children can use technology to learn and grow from it, but they must be
given positive information. Community programs like The Bridge are needed
more because of the false information being feed to youth, teens and young
adults about their potential for success and being beneficial to their communities.
The chaos they sometimes see and hear either in real life or through the
media cannot be controlled, but with efforts by The Bridge and others
children can be guided, mentored and educated in the right way.

Resources:
The Bridge of Northeast Florida
http://www.bridgejax.com/
NASA Kids Club
https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub/index.html
Taylor Richardson
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-39060043
Hidden Figures No More – NPR
http://www.npr.org/2016/12/16/505569187/hidden-figures-no-more-meet-the-black-women-who-helped-send-america-to-space
How Black Women Did The Math
http://www.npr.org/2016/09/25/495179824/hidden-figures-how-black-women-did-the-math-that-put-men-on-the-moon
Seeing More Women of Color
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/feb/09/octavia-spencer-people-of-colour-hidden-figures-diversity

March 6, 2017

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself

 

 

 

HBCU Students Don’t Wait to Market Yourself
by Pro. William Jackson
Educational Technology and Social Media
Edward Waters College @wmjackson

HBCU students in the 21st century cannot wait to market themselves
in a world of global commerce, digital Branding, intellectual sharing
and the vast Social Media sites that are building to get the word out
there about the talents, abilities and skills that HBCU students possess.

HBCU students still struggle and have faced more challenges in the past
8 years as HBCU institutions struggle to remain relevant, real and respiratory.
Even with the promises coming by the Trump administration there will
be strings attached, policies to follow, procedures to implement and even
expectations that need to be achieved.  This is not a handout, I hope it is
a help up for these historic institutions and if any money is provided
it is not mismanaged, lost in ill-advised policies nor “misplaced.”

Internal struggles have been a challenge at HBCUs either through faculty
stability, administration interaction with faculty and students or the
changes in generations of priorities. The retention and graduation of
students especially males is a serious issue that needs to be addressed.

The debate about the relevancy of HBCUs continues, data shows that a
high percentage of Black educators that are successful and work in the
most challenging schools graduate from HBCUs and continue on to
earn their advanced degrees. HBCU students are involved in STEM
careers even before STEM and STEAM where aligned with
educational initiatives.

As a graduate of an HBCU South Carolina State University ’85 and an
instructor at Edward Waters College,  the oldest HBCU in Florida, the
struggle is real and in many cases is overcome with each victory of students
graduating and becoming gainfully employed.

Teaching Educational Technology and Social Media the challenge is
teaching students how to compete for jobs before graduation, how to
Brand, then Market to a world of global competition and even tougher
globalization. This blog is about why HBCU students should market
themselves before graduation, usually starting in their junior year to
network with and collaborate with the “right folks.” Instilling in students
that if you want to be an educator, hangout with educators, if you want
to be a lawyer network with attorneys, if you want to even be a gamer
then learn from, compete with and against, and importantly network
with other gamers.

The most dangerous thing that keeps HBCU students from gaining their
dreams and aspirations is being afraid to network, speak with, talk to and
exposed to the diversity that world has to offer. Talking to my students I
share that you will not lose whatever “Blackness” you have if you have a
diversity of friends, associates, networking groups that can empower,
motivate, engage and collaborate with.

These suggestions are designed to help
HBCU students get out of their mental
boxes and to be less introverted and
race conscious
of fear and self-imposed apprehension.

Suggestions to motivate and encourage
for students and educators:

1. Learn how to market yourself before you
search for jobs, before you graduate, either
at the start or before your junior year of
higher education, vocational school or even
the transition from military service to civilian life.
2. Marketing shows your worth, talents, abilities,
work ethic, leadership abilities, being able to
function in diverse environments, acceptance
and tolerance of diversity.
Learn what marketing is….
3. The ability to adapt to the diversity of cultures, technology, responsibility
and accountability for success and failures needs to be learned. That does
not mean babying students it means teaching students how to adapt their
biases, stereotypes that they may have and how to professionally deal with
potential situations and circumstances.
4. HBCU students must always see themselves as investments.
The more you grow and improve the better investment you are to yourself
and future employers.
5. Don’t wait until your senior  year to rush to create a dope or lit resume,
start the first year and build by creating a living document of accomplishments,
volunteerism, learning, leadership, community activism and collaboration.

As a professor in higher education and as a elementary teacher it hurts my
spirit when students state “why do I have to do that”, I don’t wanna be
bothered with those people.” My response is, “do the right people know you
in the career you want or just those that do not want to see you grow beyond
them?”

6. Show yourself as well rounded; the combination of academics, job-training,
extra-curricular activities, volunteerism, all need to show your contribution to
things bigger than you are. Are you a part of something bigger than you?
7. Look at the world globally not just locally. Jacksonville, Florida is the largest
city in the USA by land mass. Students are encouraged in my class to have a
global perspective of the world. The smallest global event in their major can
have major implications on employment and involved in global markets.
8. Believe that your major course of study will have national and
potentially international influence as  you grow and take on more responsibility.
The road to leadership is driven not by money, but by willing to work hard to
make a difference in the world.
9. Learn to be familiar with foreign languages.  Dedicate yourself that you will
learn a new language especially one where you may have to use when traveling.
HBCU students can be heard talking that someday I want to, I might, maybe if.
They want to travel overseas, they do not take the time to plan, execute the plan
or even save to meet the plan. You have to start with a plan!!!
10. HBCU students network with cultural groups and participate in community
events like festivals and networking socials. Never assume that there is already
someone at an event that knows what you know. You have a wealth of inform-
ation that no one else knows.
11. It is important for HBCU students to learn how to integrate Social Media
tools and platforms beyond joking with their friends, booty calls, partying,
clubbing and acting a fool. This multi-functional, diversely dynamic platforms
can allow for communication with employers around the world. These
platforms can help start a career or end a career before it gets started.
12. Being technology savvy is important and just as importantly is how to
apply that knowledge. Use your knowledge to be involved in community
initiatives that build communities, that bring people together and open doors
for collaboration.
13. Have a reliable list of resources to help you grow.
The library services at Edward Waters College has one of the best resources
in its library staff. Emma Kent is a knowledgeable and dedicated professional
that embraces technology. Accentuating the services the library at Edward
Waters College offers. Too many students at HBCUs do not take the time
to get to know their library professionals that have a wealth of information
waiting to share and becoming friends with them. One of the best moves
for me was to be friends with the librarians, custodial staff, be nice to
the cafeteria man and women and secretaries. They became my “extra”
parents with prayers, advice and even extra food on my meal trays!!
14. HBCU students must adapt their thinking as they matriculate through the
years. Their ideas, opinions, skills, networks must change. This change should
be seen in their attire, their speech and self-confidence. Being a lifelong
learner brings benefits that will be seen in the future not just in the present.
15. Applying to both males and females, your visual personality is just as
important as your e-personality and e-reputation. Make the conscious effort
to protect yourself in the direction of your career goals and dreams.
16. During your growth take advantage of tutoring and learning outside of
academics. Attend tutoring for interview skills, cultural understanding, career
counseling, and even role playing directed at your career interests.
The more prepared you are the better prepared you are.
Obtain a mentor, someone that has life experiences, and sees your potential
that you do not. Someone that sees you as an investment to a better
future and learn from them.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.