My Quest To Teach

March 2, 2018

What I Learned From The Black Panther Movie

Filed under: #Africa,Education,Parenting — William Jackson @ 12:45 pm

What I Learned From The Black Panther Movie
by William Jackson #MyQuestToTeach

The Black Panther movie sets a continuous tone for the awareness of
behaviors and learning the value of personal accountability, self-pride,
self-awareness, responsibility to cultural strength and even generational

Each Black community is only as strong as the Black men that take
ownership and responsibility for it. Case in point, what Black man would
allow a child of any age to be killed and not assist in apprehending the
killer or killers that live in the community. This is happending across this
nation with Black children.
What Black man that is hyped about a movie like the Black Panther that
speaks of community and family love, but can stand by and see children
molested and mentally as well as physically raped?
What Black man watching the movie Black Panther can see even in a
movie the value of technological innovation, but only praise their children
for sports and entertainment?

Black fathers that are serious are involved in their children’s lives academically,
socially and culturally. There are already models for these behaviors, but
more should be done.

What I Learned From Black Panther as a Black Man and Father
is my interpretation to the responsibilities, purpose and
the blessings from being a Black man and Black father.
Whether intentional or not Black Panther has highlighted the
importance of Black fathers as parental foundations,
educatioanl leadership, spiritual conduits and cultural icons.

The uniqueness in thought leadership, innovation, creativity
and wealth is not unique to Africa which is the cradle of
human civilization. Long before Europeans where “civilized”
African ( which a continent) had universities, hospitals and
even conducted scientific research.

What I learn is listed below to encourage growth after a movie
that creates emotional hypeness and should inspire intellectual

1. Black fathers have a responsibility to raise their
children and provide for their families, even sacrificing
their comfort for the children they helped create.
2. The sins of the father sometimes do fall on future
generations, but forgiveness is imporant. No one is perfect.
3. Black men and boys must be prayed for, mentored and
guided. How can Black boys grow to be Black men if men do
not take the time to teach?
4. Black fathers must consider their legacy they
will leave behind. What words will people say about a
father, what words will children hear when the father
5. Black men must always remember they live on the
shoulders of past Black men. The hard work, sacrifice
and deligence that was exchanged for growth and success.
6. Black fathers must build to create and maintain a
foundation for their families based on education
(scholarly or vocational), economics (good stewards in money
and investments) and culturally positive (know thy history).
7. Being a father does not stop when children reach a
certain age, fathers must provide praise, positive
affirmations and continued mentorship while alive.
8. Black fathers must prepare their children for
living without their fathers, when the father dies.
Black children must have installed in them the will power
and knowledge to continue on with life when parents die.
9. Black fathers must always respect the mothers,
grandmothers and women in and out of their families.
The foundation for respect starts and is sustained
with Black fathers. Being a role model is valuable.
10. When Black men do not do what they are supposed
to do the Black woman will at great sacrifice take
the lead.
11. Black fathers and Black men must unite or they
will remain divided, weak, self-destructive and
12. Black men must support their building and
strengthening of their communities. Not waiting
for others to come in and “make things better.”
13. Black investment must be investments that
results in visible results. Planning for the now
and the future is valuable to generational success.
14. Black fathers cannot afford to only look
at sports as a way out of challenges in society.
They need to celebrate their scholars, dreamers,
innovators and smart creatives. Black children
must learn what white children are learning to
be employable and functionable in this world.
15. Black fathers need to put in just as much
work with their sons as they do with their
16. Black fathers need to hold each other
accountable. Support with love and brotherhood.
17. Black fathers need to teach each other
how to be compassionate and prayerful.
18. “Evangelism should be reinforced by men to
other men.” C. McClendon; Northside Church
of Christ
19. Black men should be supportive and
good stewards of finances. Teach their
children how to save, spend and invest money.
20.Black men should study the greatness of
their past, share it with their present
and prepare for their future.
21.Black fathers should participate in
leadership roles within the community and
within their children’s schools.
22. Educational leadership is important in
the homes of Black families. Black men should
have libraries of books and even books on DVD.
23. The voices of Black fathers should have
the resonation of pride of lions for truth,
justice and unity.
24. Black men and fathers should not need
law enforcement to stop violence in their
25. Black men should be surrounded with
Black children whether they are theirs
or not. Teaching, mentoring, praying and
supporting them.
26. Black men should be speaking power and
purpose into their children’s lives. The
power of the tongue is generational.
27. Black fathers should be seen with their
and other Black children in libraries,
museums and cultural centers teaching and
showing the fun and value of learning.
28. Black men and Black fathers should
not lean on their own understanding, but
a unit of spiritual and intellectual
29. Black fathers should allow knowledge
to help solve problems and issues not
emotional violence.
30.The love of each other as Black fathers
and Black men should unite and never divide.


February 28, 2018

“What I Learned from Watching The Black Panther Movie”

Filed under: #Africa,Brotherhood,Education — William Jackson @ 8:34 pm



Black Panther!!!!! 
Coming Soon… 
“What I Learned from Watching The Black Panther Movie”

November 17, 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017

21 Reasons African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness
William Jackson #MyQuestToTeach
Sponsor of WordCamp Nairobi Kenya 2017
The recent WordCamp Nairobi and other tech venues
that are hosting technology conferences, workshops,
meetups and supporting entrepreneurs and I-trepreneurs
are growing in Africa. Tech is becoming common place.
Being dope on Social Media is not a cultural thing, it is
the ability to be comfortable in your digital skin as a
content creator, digital creator, innovator, graphic artist
or even a dope web developer. Everyone has a dope
side to them, it just takes time to discover it and
importantly apply that dopeness to a positive online
It means that it is ok to have fun on the web and to
integrate yourself into your product or service even on
a digital level. Too many people lose the excitement of
creating content that will be read, viewed, studied,
listened to and watched. Audiences change as access
and platforms change, so why not be Dope and Lit,
providing something that brings people to you and
influence community activist and activism?
SEO even in Africa – Search Engine Optimization is not
always the ticket, WOM or Word of Mouth is still important
and should always be a viable strategy to build followers.
Search Engine Optimization is tech based, but
technology cannot always bring readers. Building
relationships and collaborations are the keys.
Africans are expanding their presence and their ability
to create dynamic digital content.
As a parent, educator, blogger, mentor, community
activist and STEAM Advocate and proud sponsor for
WordCamp Nairobi, Kenya here are my 21 Reasons
African Digital Innovation Can Build Dopeness

Nairobi Conference
1. To attract diverse readers and viewers. Being diversified
in your audience is a plus because people connect with
what they like, how it relates to their needs and relevance.
2. Most viewers will be women and they love dope content.
Try not to be boring or repetitive.
3. If you want a broad spectrum of followers dope up your
blog with relevant content and graphics that match your
audience. Diversity is Dope
4. International markets look to promote Dope and Lit
content. They always look for awesome people.
5. If you’re looking to monetize your site and content
expand your dopeness to new markets that embraces
diversity and engagement.
6. Hire dope speakers like myself to talk on your Podcasts.
If you’re having a workshop or conference be very selective
because content has to be dope and exciting.
7. Take plenty of dope photos and videos with dope and lit
people. Use your Instagram and Twitter sites to share and
expand your reach.
8. Speak at WordCamps, BarCamps, EdCamps and other
tech conferences.
9. Always have your business cards available, make sure
there is a dope photo of yourself and have your “elevator
pitch” ready.
10. Hire a dope graphic artist to create your dope logo.
11. Be a sponsor and promoter of community events like
WordCamp as you grow.
12. Join the Chamber of Commerce and other dope
organizations that are invested in the community and city.
13. Be a speaker on talk shows to share your knowledge.
14. Start your own Podcast with guests and be fancy
with your title.
15. See where you can help your church or ministry with their
16. Take a Social Media class yourself.
17. Offer Social Media classes with certificates when completed.
18. Keep your profiles current, relevant and oozzing with dopeness.
19. Take a dope vacation from time to time to encourage
inspiration locally, nationally and internationally.
20. Embrace diversity in your vision and expression.
21. Network – Network – Network
“How To Be Dope On Social Media 2017”
William Jackson Speaking at
WordCamp Wilmington, North Carolina

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